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WR250X tank shroud bob

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This is more for the Supermoto guys and I posted this at SMJ, but i thought you all might get a kick out of it too...

I bobbed the tank shrouds on my WRX. Here's what I did...

I thought about leaving the shrouds off completely, but decided I wanted to keep the rear part for covering up the tank seam. Plus I like the look in that area.

But if I just cut the front, it would leave a big open scoop pulling the pastic away from the tank. So I experimented with a piece of plastic cut from the front fender, and confirmed it could be reshaped with some heat.

heat_gun.jpg

It takes some time to get the plastic warmed up. It'll start to get a white-ish reflection as it heats, then it will turn a deep blue again. That's when you can reform it. Careful though, if you concentrate too much heat in one spot, you'll get some surface flow and it'll look like it's been melted. Good to practice.

Ok, then after walking around and staring at the pieces on and off the bike for a LONG time, here's where I cut it:

r_shroud_chop.jpg

Left a couple inches to fold toward the front.

I also had to cut a notch in the black plastic to allow a fold. (All the black plastic to the left was eventualy removed). On the back side, I peeled back the insulation so I could heat from both sides.

r_shroud_back.jpg

After heating and folding:

r_shroud_folded.jpg

Here's a quick check back on the bike.

r_shroud_prelim.jpg

Still stuck out too far from the tank, so I notched into the black plastic along that top ridge and slid the blue plastic underneath it. You can kind of see it in this next shot:

rad_trim_tabs.jpg

Cut the radiator tabs off too. You gotta commit if you're going to do something like this!

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Along the way as I was trimming, heating, and folding, I ended up cutting back the top end of the blue plastic. WRONG. Once I got it all formed, I couldn't attach that flap back to the black! <GRRRR!>

r_shroud_secondcut.jpg

You can see a parallel gap between the leading black and blue edges.

Decided to get medieval on it and bent up a chunk of aluminum sheet with rivets to close that gap and secure it.

r_shroud_top-rivets.jpg

<GACK> I'm not very happy with that little eyesore. I painted the rivets black, but still... Oh well. It's got some character I suppose. Maybe I'll score a blue shroud from someone who's gone black and re-do it... It's solid for now.

Left side was a piece of cake after doing the right. The shape makes it much easier. Cut and folded under:

l_shroud_folded.jpg

One rivet on the top and two on the bottom. That's more like it!

l_shroud_top-rivet.jpg

l_shroud_bot-rivets.jpg

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And what about all the crap under the shroud on the left? Well I'm no longer carrying around this bracket:

L-F_bracket.jpg

The Air Induction System (AIS) valve and hoses were removed completely. Have to cap it at the airbox and at the head. I got a tip from someone here at TT to use 1/8 aluminum stock from the local hw store. Cut and drilled a piece and bolted it on using the stock stainless gasket.

Both the rectifier/regulator and the horn went down front. If a rock takes it out, I'll be glad that it wasn't my engine case.

reloc_horn.jpg

For the horn I drilled a hole into the frame. Took some rubber flap material from under the tank and cut rubber washers from them. Horn mount:

horn-steelwasher-rubberwasher-frame-rubberwasher-steelwasher-nut.

I used a piece of the 1/8" aluminum to span the mount for the regulator. The frame nuts were already there. I took the rubber grommets out of the stock exhaust shield and used those to mount the rectifier. Blue Loctite on all this stuff!

One more piece of that aluminum stock to help with the overflow tank mount. It's just a 90 degree bend to an existing mount hole, then attached with a zip tie.

overflow_fuse.jpg

That let me get it in nice and tight without having to make a perfect bracket to fit. The bottom of the bottle is zip tied to the harness. It just clears the forks when turned full left. (I'll have to pull it out later to make sure the frame isn't wearing the plastic. Some rubber flap if it is.)

If you look just above the bottle, you'll see the relocated fuses tucked in behind. Still accessible. 🙂

I cut off the AIS wires, but didn't shorten anything else. I just wrapped up the extra and secured it to the left frame member.

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I rode it around that way for a while, but decided to add a bracket to support the radiator. It didn't bounce around or anything, but I thought it might be better to have it a bit more secure.

Made a template from paper, then I made this bracket from sheet stock aluminum.

rad-bkt_below.jpg

The rear attaches to an existing bolt which holds a hose bracket. The bracket wraps back under itself to the attament point. I did it this way to make sure there was clearance to the hoses. The hole in front is for allen wrench access to the bolt.

rad-bkt_above.jpg

The edges have to be rolled under to give it stiffness. It's plenty stiff enough now.

Not the cleanest bracket, but it didn't take me that long to do. Once I get the bike fully how I want it, this might be another piece to re-do. Plenty solid and functional for now.

Well, that's about it. Here's a couple shots of the results (before I remounted the horn).

- Dave

right.jpg

left.jpg

rear.jpg

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Good fab! What does taking out the AIS do for the bike? Oh yeah, and don't burn the ol legs on the now exposed radiator.

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Good fab! What does taking out the AIS do for the bike? Oh yeah, and don't burn the ol legs on the now exposed radiator.

Thanks. The AIS injects fresh air from your air filter into the exhaust port area to help burn any remaining fuel fumes. It's for emissions only and doesn't effect performance. Removing it actually decreases your exhaust temp.

Yeah, the knee to radiator -- and fan! -- is another reason I put in the 'Y' bracket. In practice when I move up high, the shroud that is left there supports my thigh pretty well. I don't feel like I'm getting into the radiator itself.

[EDIT:] ... but then I might not move up as high as some others do. 🙂

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Nice write up Dave. Thanks for all the good close up shots. I like the look. 🙂

Still think you need to mod the tail and put it back on though.

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Nice write up Dave. Thanks for all the good close up shots. I like the look. 🙂

Still think you need to mod the tail and put it back on though.

Thanks.

With how it is now, I think you're right. Some blue at the rear would be a nice balance to the front end.

But the thing is, I'm planning on trying out black hugger fenders front and rear (boo - hiss, I know...:worthy::D). And in that case I might rather keep the rear stock so I can sell it.

Eh, we'll see...

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Dave, looking at your mod there, I think this winter I would take the wasted space under the shrouds and turn it into a larger tank. Get the tank expanded a little and paint it black.

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Dave, looking at your mod there, I think this winter I would take the wasted space under the shrouds and turn it into a larger tank. Get the tank expanded a little and paint it black.

The shrouds at the rear there are right up tight on the tank, so there really isn't any extra space under there. It would be nice to have some more capacity, though... I could see chopping off the top of the tank and repacing it with an upper shape which fills out further along the sides, and maybe up higher also. I'm not a welder myself, so I don't see that in my future.

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OK, mwakey. These are for you:

rear_fender_on_R.jpg

rear_fender_on_L.jpg

I'll think about it... :worthy:

Now THAT looks NICE! 🙂:D

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