Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Cold Air Intake Question

Recommended Posts

Why do these companies call them Cold Air Intakes when all the do is have an open filter under the hood where it is hot, shouldn't they be called Hot Air Intakes?

Cold air makes more hp but the way these "Cold Air Intakes" are they suck up hot air from under the hood where the stock filter setup actually pulls air from inside the fender which in turn is pulling air from outside the vehicle...it would seem that the stock air filter setup would create more HP wouldn't it? Am I missing something?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the ones under your hood often have a shield that blocks the hot air. but they are often called short ram intakes. true cold air intakes go into your fenderwell but makes cleaning/changing the filter a pain, and that is why people go with the short ram intakes. both are better than stock because of the tubing wont heat soak (unless you get a metal one...dont do that lol) but even the best cold air intake will only get you a couple horse.... worth the hundred or two for one? probably not, you would be better off with an exhaust for the same gain and at least your car/truck would sound alot better

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah most cold air intakes are really short ram air intakes which suck in hot air from under the hood, and make more noise. Many companies also advertise astronomical HP gains and people buy into that stuff. You really need to research the benefits of adding one to your car. For example there are a couple "cold air intakes" made for my car (2003 Maxima), and all of them put the air filter near the engine behind the radiator without any heat shields. :) While the stock setup sucks in air from in front of the radiator where the cooler air hits the car. Needless to say I wasn't gonna shell out $150 to make my car sound louder and run worse than it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an intake on my Taco. Along with cat-back exhaust, probably gives me (maybe) a 10hp gain. But sounds cool. True CAI go into the wheel well or under the radiator. Almost all "intakes" made are Short rams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why do these companies call them Cold Air Intakes when all the do is have an open filter under the hood where it is hot, shouldn't they be called Hot Air Intakes?

Cold air makes more hp but the way these "Cold Air Intakes" are they suck up hot air from under the hood where the stock filter setup actually pulls air from inside the fender which in turn is pulling air from outside the vehicle...it would seem that the stock air filter setup would create more HP wouldn't it? Am I missing something?

witt, I have been calling them hot air intakes for years. Even the ones with a seal, isnt sealed tight. Heck, OE intakes suck air from either behind the grille or under the fender skirt. Not missing anything, cool air is more dense, more hp, but it doenst make that cool loud sound when you put your foot into it like a hot air system does. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the responses everybody. :)

witt, I have been calling them hot air intakes for years. Even the ones with a seal, isnt sealed tight. Heck, OE intakes suck air from either behind the grille or under the fender skirt. Not missing anything, cool air is more dense, more hp, but it doenst make that cool loud sound when you put your foot into it like a hot air system does. :ride:

Yea it doesn't make much sense to me. :D

I started looking for one for my Suburban becasue in another thread a few people said that on the 6.0 an exhaust, chip, and intake made a difference in towing. At first I disagreed and said I didn't think a few bolt ons would help with towing but a few more people said it did so I thought I would give it a try. :worthy:

I started looking at them and I found pretty much all of them have an open filter element that is located under the hood. Well we all know cold air is better so by the looks of it I would think my stock system is better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard how bolt on's help with other vehicles and out of the two I've done them to I've maybe noticed a slightly difference but never anything huge. It was usually small enough if you could tell a difference it was tiny and it was soo small you would forget about it in a day or so as it wouldn't be much of one. I think bolt on's are basically only good if you want the looks and sounds.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More of a gimmick than anything for normal average commuter cars.

You may gain minimal, not even noticable power gains. Your car may possibly run worse depending on the ECU.

Turbo and supercharged vehicles really benefit from being uncorked..exhaust, filter and headwork..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In some cases it will increase the amount of air into the engine. More air means more fuel. Most stock computers can compensate for it, but you will have less flexibility for the computer to correct the air fuel ratio for changes in the running condition of the engine or the environment. This can equal a Check Engine Light down the road.

I have seen a lot of parts thrown at the vehicle because of this. It is hard to believe when it happens 20K-30K miles down the road, but it does. Run it stock at it will be fine.

For Whats Its Worth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wit, I installed the Airaid intake on my 6.0 Silverado last weekend. When I assembled the filter housing/box, I made sure to seal all the seams with 100% silicone caulking. The housing intakes directly behind and below the headlight assembly, between the radiator and fender and compared to the two small (and obviously restrictive) oval ports in the inner fender that the stock box had to intake through, the new box has much more breathing space that's separated from the engine compartment.

After a week with the new intake, I can say without a doubt that the throttle response is exponentially better and acceleration requires much less pedal. I have yet to tow my trailer or check my road-trip mpg with the new intake, but I can say that I'm already impressed.

After reprogramming the performance and the transmission with the Superchips MicroMax tuner a couple years ago, the truck would "lay drag" as the local police like to refer to it, spinning the 35/12.50-17 Pro-Comp X-treme A/T's when shifting from 1st to 2nd and 2nd to 3rd under hard acceleration-now that's even more pronounced after adding the intake.

So far, so good...and money I'm glad I spent. 👍:worthy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i got a K&N for my 4.7 tundra. It is very loud and added a little power (though i did lose some under 1500rpm). My mpg also went up by around .75-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wit, I installed the Airaid intake on my 6.0 Silverado last weekend. When I assembled the filter housing/box, I made sure to seal all the seams with 100% silicone caulking. The housing intakes directly behind and below the headlight assembly, between the radiator and fender and compared to the two small (and obviously restrictive) oval ports in the inner fender that the stock box had to intake through, the new box has much more breathing space that's separated from the engine compartment.

After a week with the new intake, I can say without a doubt that the throttle response is exponentially better and acceleration requires much less pedal. I have yet to tow my trailer or check my road-trip mpg with the new intake, but I can say that I'm already impressed.

After reprogramming the performance and the transmission with the Superchips MicroMax tuner a couple years ago, the truck would "lay drag" as the local police like to refer to it, spinning the 35/12.50-17 Pro-Comp X-treme A/T's when shifting from 1st to 2nd and 2nd to 3rd under hard acceleration-now that's even more pronounced after adding the intake.

So far, so good...and money I'm glad I spent. 👍:worthy:

Thanks for the info. :busted:

When I first bought the Sub my plan was to supercharge it and then I started leaning towards just doing some simple bolt on and calling it good...like exhaust, intake, and programmer. Well after more thinking I have decided to supercharge it after all. I talked to Whipple this week and they will have a kit to fit my application in about 3 months. I decided to go with Whipple because the factory is about 30 minutes from me and they will do the installation there so I won't have to go through a dealer. I feel a lot more comfortable having the factory install it instead of a dealer.

When I talked to them they said they will reprogram the computer and the intake is all new when they supercharge it so they said if I buy anything for it for the time being it will just be replaced. I'm going to do headers and a full exhaust in the meantime but as far as the intake and programmer goes I'll just let Whipple do their thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one on my tundra and I lost all my bottom end and it moved my "powerband" to the upper RPMs. If you are towing, a CAI is the worst mod to do.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...