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Suspension setup on a 2008 450 xcr-w

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I just came off of a '99 yz400f. That bike was rock solid stable without a steering stabilizer. I just took my new ktm 450 xcr-w out for a ride and it really deflected easily over bumps, rocks, ruts, dirt clods..ect. I like how light it feels, but I just don't have the confidence in the stability of the bike.

I checked my static sag after I rode it and it was 45mm (1.75 in).

I then adjusted it to the GOLDEN RULE OF SAG (not sure who came up with these numbers, might be Dwight Rudder).

Here's where I'm at now:

I'm around 180 lbs (plus or minus a few tacos and beer), 41 years old. Decent shape, I like to mountain bike a lot, although I could loose about 10 lbs.

I just set up my rear sag:

40mm static

115mm rider (with gear)

9-10mm of pre-load on the rear spring

I think I'm within the window of the stock spring with the above settings, although I think some people suggest less pre-load?

Front:

35mm static sag

65-70mm rider sag.

Can I expect more stability with the above settings? Do I need to mess with the rebound or compression? Which way do I go? Currently I have it set up in the comfort settings (recommended by the owner's manual). Basically I have the compression and rebound backed out quite a bit. The front fork spring pre-load is turned in around 2 turns.

Thanks,

LJ.

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I just came off of a '99 yz400f. That bike was rock solid stable without a steering stabilizer. I just took my new ktm 450 xcr-w out for a ride and it really deflected easily over bumps, rocks, ruts, dirt clods..ect. I like how light it feels, but I just don't have the confidence in the stability of the bike.

I checked my static sag after I rode it and it was 45mm (1.75 in).

I then adjusted it to the GOLDEN RULE OF SAG (not sure who came up with these numbers, might be Dwight Rudder).

Here's where I'm at now:

I'm around 180 lbs (plus or minus a few tacos and beer), 41 years old. Decent shape, I like to mountain bike a lot, although I could loose about 10 lbs.

I just set up my rear sag:

40mm static

115mm rider (with gear)

9-10mm of pre-load on the rear spring

I think I'm within the window of the stock spring with the above settings, although I think some people suggest less pre-load?

Front:

35mm static sag

65-70mm rider sag.

Can I expect more stability with the above settings? Do I need to mess with the rebound or compression? Which way do I go? Currently I have it set up in the comfort settings (recommended by the owner's manual). Basically I have the compression and rebound backed out quite a bit. The front fork spring pre-load is turned in around 2 turns.

Thanks,

LJ.

WP suggests being as close to 35mm static sag as possible (ideally your front would more or less sag the same which it does)

rider sag should lie between 90mm and 105mm...

for your weight the spring is suggested as 80-250 on the rear (80 N/mm) - your rear preload is within regular limits

as always these are only guidelines...

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WP suggests being as close to 35mm static sag as possible (ideally your front would more or less sag the same which it does)

rider sag should lie between 90mm and 105mm...

for your weight the spring is suggested as 80-250 on the rear (80 N/mm) - your rear preload is within regular limits

as always these are only guidelines...

Please oh please don't run 90mm of sag on a ktm...

Depending on riding style (sit down or standing) 105mm-115mm is a good number. I tune my sag by how the front end works. If it pushes, decrease the sag. If it knifes, increase sag. KTMs are well know for being slightl under sprung in the rear, 3-7mm of preload is a good target range.

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I think you mean:

If it pushes, reduce sag.

If it knifes, increase sag.

You had decrease and reduce sag for both scenerios.

How about if it feels nervous at speed, increase sag?

Thanks for your reply!

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Nice catch, all fixed now..

The best way to check the nervousness at speed is move around when it starts to get twichy.. Based on your riding position the stablity will change and you can ajust your sag.

Since you are running your clickers way out it could be you need to increase the LS compression using the clickers. As for rebound that kind of is a personal preference, but I would start slightly out from the middle. Say 18ish from full hard.

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Thanks for the input! I'm going to invest in a day of playing around with the rebound and compression to fully understand the effects on how the bike handles. I can imagine that rebound might have more of an effect than compression since it controls how the wheel(s) follow the terrain. I would think that more rebound damping might reduce the front end from washing out since it would tend not to "unload" the front wheel more when rebounding. Time to put the theory to a test...

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Please oh please don't run 90mm of sag on a ktm...

Depending on riding style (sit down or standing) 105mm-115mm is a good number. .

agreed... even I run slightly outside the recommended range on my yami!

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