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DRZ camera mounting and vibration...

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Does anyone know how to mount a camera so that the picture isn't affected by engine rpms? I've tried a variety of ways, but the result is the same, those rubbery vibrations that vary with engine speed.

Here's a

of the vibrations. (it's just some normal riding) They distort the picture and give it a rubbery look. The old Emachine finally died and the new one has enough ability to handle video editing so I'm having lots of fun with it.:)

Greg

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I know this will sound odd but have you tried turning off the anti-shake function? is it optical anti shake or digital or none at all?

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Hi Greg I cant see your vid at work but is it vibrations or is it noise in the image ?

what do you use to power the camera ?

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The camera is one of these...

AT18_th.jpg

I really like it because it's cheap simple rugged totally self contained (batteries are inside camera) and takes an hour of 30 frames per second video.

But there's no anti shake capabilities. The vibrations seem to be physical, and not electrical noise related.

I tried helmet mounting, but am having trouble getting a consistently proper angle dependent on how the helmet sits on my head. Sometimes it shoots too high and sometimes, too low. Whereas on the bike, once it's dialed in, it stays put... but it picks up vibrations that "rubberize" the frame resolutions.

I'm open to any and all suggestions...

Greg

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I have had the same issue, but with camcorders. Turning off image stabilization is a good idea on cameras that have it, but it wouldn't help in this application. The vibrations are too severe.

The buzziness blurs out everything as the engine winds up. The solution is a more isolated mount, attached to something of sizable mass. I am going to try a magmount to my gas tank, but I am not hopeful. I suspect it will require something like a chestplate mount, which my friend and I are dreaming up.

Helmet mounts point the camera all over. I think the body is more stable.

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We used "Wire Rope Vibration-Damping Mounts" on a helicopter-mounted imager with good results. Search for "Wire Rope Vibration-Damping Mounts" in the Mc Master Carr catalog.

The miniature ones should be be workable for such a small camera.

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We have the same Cam and issue when it's on my bike vs the BMW when it's on that bike.

So I bought the Go Pro

2595718933_c805501dfd.jpg?v=0

It takes pictures, video, 3 piture bursts and a picture every 5 seconds until card is full or batteries run out.

Go to GoPro.com

Good luck:thumbsup:

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Here's my mount:

100_0158.jpg

I made it out of 2 pieces of aluminum and sandwiched silicone in between them. I still get vibrations though. Here is a vid I shot with it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5y17CivPj8

I used a cheap Kodak digital still camera I got at a local store for $60. I think it only does 20fps.

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Here's some inspiration for you Greg.

Just make a simple wedge shape out of aluminum to mount the thing on your visor screw.

100_3017.jpg

Now notice the weird angle the camera is mounted at.

You would think this angle would be too high but it's just right when your wearing the helmet.

100_3018.jpg

Here's a video I made last year with the camera mounted to the sub-frame looking out back. This one has some serious shakes going on.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6320968638679720687&q=source:005512224885578915853&hl=en

I made some street videos with the helmet setup but never uploaded them.

The angles were correct on them as best I remember.

It's going to be hard to isolate the vibrations mounting the camera to the bike.

Hope this helps.

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Thanks to all of you for your ideas... :)

The little cable isolation platforms are an intriguing design and my wife has a GoPro, so maybe I'll see how hers works on the bike.

Krob, your video doesn't have that rubbery frame kind of vibration, so a siliconed platform might do the trick.

Dan, the helmet mount is slick, and I may end up with something similar if the vibrations can't be resolved. For now, I'll keep trying ways to mount the camera on the bike rather than on me.

Take Care,

Greg

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I put the mounting bracket on the LHS mirror base. Had to use a bit of garden hose (the green bit) to pack it out and using one of the rubber straps that came with it. I get good video and no vibration, or its not noticable.

IMAG0052.jpg

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I put the mounting bracket on the LHS mirror base. Had to use a bit of garden hose (the green bit) to pack it out and using one of the rubber straps that came with it. I get good video and no vibration, or its not noticable.

IMAG0052.jpg

Hi Z, :worthy:

Positively brilliant idea! :D

I'll certainly give it a go... Your vertical mounting orientation is rotated 90degrees from what I've been trying. So the vibrations should transmit through the camera mount differently. This just may do the trick! :ride:

Thanks, man,:)

Greg

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I also put the camera on the GSXR1000 same sort of way.

Only thing is the sound goes off when you go over 80mph and the vibrations weren't bad at even :) mph !!

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Hey Z, :D

I know what you mean. High speed sound quality is a problem. Here's what I did to help it. Normally over a certain velocity the wind blowing over the mic hole overwhelms it, and drowns out everything else until the point where overdriving shuts it off.

So I put a small piece of foam tape over the mic hole...

IMG_1743.jpg

Wind noise is drastically reduced when its no longer blowing directly across the mic hole. The camera has automatic volume gain and so compensates for the decrease in available sound under quieter conditions, and thus raises the available recording threshold at faster speeds.:)

Take Care,

Greg

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What brand of camera is that? And how much do they cost?

Hi sport, :D

It's an Oregon Scientific ATC2K. I think it's about $110 including a memory card, and it even films under water!:)

Take Care,

Greg

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Krob, your video doesn't have that rubbery frame kind of vibration, so a siliconed platform might do the trick.

I've never really had a problem with with the rubbery frame vibes with my camera. My problem was with the high frequency type. It is quite a bit better now than when it was solid mounted but it still needs some work.

I just tossed mine up as an option you could try.

Rob

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