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Dead bike and getting out of the woods...

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Hi Gang,

I'm hoping someone might have some good insight on this one. I was riding alone last weekend and took a good spill in the woods. I was about a mile from the closest road (class 6). I managed to get my bike started again, but it got me thinking. If you are in an area where you can't wheel your bike out (because the terrain is too tough) what's your best bet for getting it out of the area. A lot of the terrain is too tight to get a 4x4 truck in. An ATV, toe rope and a buddy I suppose would do the trick, but what if you had to do it yourself. My bike weights about 230lbs dry. I'm thinking if I could get it on my back, I could move it. Anyone ever rig up anything to carry a bike this way? Thanks for any ideas.

Tom

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I know I can carry 230 lbs on my back, or shoulders, but I'm not sure about doing that over rough terrain. And the bike would be so awkward. I have also never trail ridden by myself. If I really could not push it out, I think I'd hide it really really really well and come back for it. I know I have not really answered your question directly.

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Get a sat phone with one of these guys on speed dial:

airport_050922-047b.jpg

Seriously though, it might be better to carry a cable lock and lock your bike to a tree - hoof it out and come back for it when you have some help. A GPS would be a real asset to save the position of your bikes location. How long could you seriously carry 230lbs on your back - especially up or down steep and technical inclines? If you can do that, I envy you.

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1. make sure your bike is in good mechanical condition and won't crap out on you in BFE.

2. Carry tools to make minor repairs and adjustment, so if it does crap out yo might be able to fix it enough to limp home.

3. Be physically and mentally prepared to hike out if it comes down to that. We mostly ride in the deep backcountry in the summer, but we have maps and know where we are and it's rarely more than 10 miles or so to the nearest well-traveled (at least once a day) dirt road.

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We had a bike break down about 8 miles from anything. I rode back to the pits, got a rope and returned (just the two of us). We tied them up and started towing. Within a mile or so the washer that holds my front sprocket on managed to shatter and the sprocket fell off. We ended up spending the rest of the day (about noon to ~5PM) pushing both bikes the 7 miles or so back to the pits. Talk about suck! Temp was in the 90's and we ran out of water after the first four miles or so.

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Carry some basic tools, I really try not to trail ride alone you could get hurt and not be able to walk out, then your gonna have to call the man vs wild dude

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Lock it up and hide it and walk out. There is no way anyone is going to carry a 200+ pound bike on their back. Heck the things got wheels! Roll it! if something happened that it can't be pushed leave it there. If it can be pushed, still leave it! Ever try pushing a bike home? tough work.

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Don't go out alone.

There is the best solution. What if you were hurt too badly to move, like a broken leg or worse. :)

ben

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There is the best solution. What if you were hurt too badly to move, like a broken leg or worse. :)

I've ridden with a broken leg.

Anyway even if you're with someone else, you can still get in a situation where the bike needs to be extracted, like if a stator or ignition just up and dies for no good reason.

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You guys would be amazed what kind of injuries you can ride with. I have ridden with a broken foot and know people who have ridden with broken legs etc.

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I've ridden with a broken leg.

Anyway even if you're with someone else, you can still get in a situation where the bike needs to be extracted, like if a stator or ignition just up and dies for no good reason.

Understood, the point is you shouldn't ride alone. No one can ever predict when they might need the help of someone to survive. If I were hurt bad enough, the bike would be my last concern if at all.

Even still, having someone with you makes getting your bike out more of a reality, even if you aren't hurt.

ben

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Understood, the point is you shouldn't ride alone.

:):D

Great topic for a different thread (if it hadn't already been beaten to death 98734 times). If you're scared of riding alone, don't do it. I'm not going to stop.

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I slid off a trail once and into a gully about 15' below the trail. The only way out was down the gully - which of course was opposite the way I wanted to go - it wasn't rideable, plus I was pretty banged up.

What I learned from that was:

1) avoid riding alone (as posted above)

2) If you ride alone, accept that you can be *really* screwed

3) work with what you have should something happen. That may mean leaving your bike and walking out, waiting until the heat of the day is over before "gutting up" and pushing the bike out, or waiting for a rescue.

Better to ride with a buddy. :)

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:):D

Great topic for a different thread (if it hadn't already been beaten to death 98734 times). If you're scared of riding alone, don't do it. I'm not going to stop.

Lots of stuff gets talked about repeated times. It is always a valid point to make when it regards safety. Not all members are adults or mature (not the same thing), and could benefit from the information.

You are entitled to your opinion and choice to ride alone. Just as I can have the opinion that you are stupid if you do ride alone, especially distances or terrain that could complicate things in an emergency.

Where I live, people die when stuff happens while riding alone. It could be as simple as a flat tire, broken chain, whatever. The desert environment is very dangerous if you are not prepared for it. Happens almost every year here, that someone dies while riding their bike in the desert.

But, I'll admit that I'm a bit radical, I don't even like going to the track to ride alone.

ben

ben

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When I ride alone, I always carry a cell phone, whether convient or not. My dad has had to come get me a few times for different things, no gas, broken chain, etc. When I ride with buddies its no worries, which is the best way to go IMO.

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I'd hide my bike and hike it out if I couldn't make trail repairs. I ride alone quite a bit as my schedule will allow me to ride during the day while others are working or sometimes there's just nobody that wants to ride.

I carry tools, some first aid stuff, a lighter, a compass, a little led flashlight and my cell phone(which may or may not work where I'm at). I don't run race pace while alone but still have had some incidents. I also hunt alone and do other things that people say never do alone. Lifes too short to sit at home.

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Where I live, people die when stuff happens while riding alone. It could be as simple as a flat tire, broken chain, whatever. The desert environment is very dangerous if you are not prepared for it. Happens almost every year here, that someone dies while riding their bike in the desert.

That's cool. If you don't feel like you're prepared for it, then don't ride alone. I AM prepared for it.

I also ride my bicycle alone, ski alone, often shower alone, walk down the stairs alone, run my chainsaw alone, and do many other things that might cause my death if something unlucky were to happen. God gave us brains so we can manage our risks. I manage mine by being prepared and using sensible judgement on the trail. Others can manage theirs by riding less than I do.

If I die on the trail tomorrow, I will think I made the right choice in getting many hundreds of hours of unbelievably spectacular rides in, rides that I would have missed if I had to make sure to hook up with someone else.

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