Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

O-Ring or X-Ring Chain?

Recommended Posts

I've heard alot of people don't like x-ring and o-ring chains because they get dirty.

I personally prefer the D.I.D 520 ERT2 Gold Chain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've heard alot of people don't like x-ring and o-ring chains because they get dirty.

I personally prefer the D.I.D 520 ERT2 Gold Chain.

I second that... ERT2 is by far the best chain I have ever used. No need for x or o-ring chain for the track

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A DID520VT x-ring chain won't slow a 450 down and it will outlast the best conventional chains many times over. You have to run a countershaft sprocket spacer to fit one on the Hondas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have a did x ring on my drz. i honestly get 10 mi per tank better now that i have it. seriously! i love my x ring chain!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take the chain seals, cut them and look at the cross section. One is round, one looks like an X. Both seal the chain, but one seals with one contact point and one with two.

So, the X ring is not only supposed to hold in the factory injected lube better, it's support to have a bit less drag (increased HP). Can you feel the power diff? Carmichael might, I can't...

irispic.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think running a non ring chain is more expensive... I ride MX as well as offroad. I am using the Regina ORN6 O ring chain. If you want a chain that will last longer and have less friction, Regina has an X ring chain. So far I am up to 73.1 hrs on it with the stock sprockets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chain sealing ring construction is a moot point without comparing chain tensile strength. Tensile strength is the resistance to stretching.

Chains go to hell when they "stretch", and the sprockets start to "hook" the teeth.

I choose my chains based on the tensile strength, then get whatever sealed chain is available in that tensile strength.

You can have the best sealing system known to man, but if the chain is constructed of swiss cheese, it won't matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chains don't stretch by way of material yielding. If they did, you would have chain failure by way of brakage within 10-20 hrs

Chains get longer because the pins and bushes' wear with use.

Most MX riders don't use sealed chains. A non sealed chain robs less power and is better suited to Aluminum sprokets as they wear at about the same rate.

Enduro and recreational riders tend to use sealed chains as teh extra power lost is irralivant and these chains are better suited to steel sprokets again to match wear rates.

The difference between X and O ring chains is well explained above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chains don't stretch by way of material yielding. If they did, you would have chain failure by way of brakage within 10-20 hrs

Chains get longer because the pins and bushes' wear with use.

Aren't they the same thing? If the material wears, it has yielded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If a material yeilds, thats plastic deformation, meaning the material doesn't return to it's original shape. The bushings and pins wear away by friciton and causes slop and loosness in the chain, which makes the chain longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If a material yeilds, thats plastic deformation, meaning the material doesn't return to it's original shape. The bushings and pins wear away by friciton and causes slop and loosness in the chain, which makes the chain longer.

I've disassembled a few chains to shorten them, and seen that the side plates have a slight deformation in the pin holes where it has started to mushroom out.

Either way, a higher tensile strength chain will resist stretch, wear, deformation, or as most refer to it "being circular filed" more than a lower tensile strength chain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...