Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Offroad only sprockets???

Recommended Posts

I got an Ironman 47 tooth today for my L. I don't understand why it says on the package for offroad oly. :worthy: 650L is a dualsport so why would it say this? If you ride it on the road is it going ruin it or something.:D Sounds kind of dumb to me? BTW Ironman no longer makes a 47 either, this was the last of old stock. I don't know why many of these sprocket makers are not making 47's for the L anymore.:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who knows,,sounds bizarre and like you I wouldn't concern myself with whats written on packaging..47,,,huge...I run a 39 on my 600..Use it on the road more than dirt..1st is kinda large.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am fairly certain that sprockets from a 1996+ XR250 will fit the XRL. I regularly swap rear wheels with the two bikes and I think the sprockets will interchange as well. I will take a closer look tomorrow.

Reason being the stock sprocket for the 250 is 48 teeth I believe and I think they are made in the 51+ teeth range.

Just took a quick look online. Looks like part numbers cross reference for the XRL and 96+ XR250. Sunstar makes a 53 tooth steel sprocket for the 250 and a 55 tooth aluminum sprocket. Those should be more than big enough to get you down into the rock crawling speeds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I got an Ironman 47 tooth today for my L. I don't understand why it says on the package for offroad oly. :) 650L is a dualsport so why would it say this? If ...

Can't say for a fact, but my educated guess is by labeling parts "off-road use only" it releases the MFG's from liability in our litigation happy society.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had to guess, I would think it goes back to the whole fuel economy issue. The stock gearing on the L, as well as the jetting, was designed for maximum fuel economy and minimal exhaust emissions to meet California's stricter than any place on the face of the earth standards. By increasing the size of the rear sprocket and lowering the overall gearing, fuel consumption and exhaust emissions are increased. This is the manufactuer's way around California emissions laws, just like aftermarket performance auto parts makers. If a part has a negative effect on emissions, the maker has to address it to keep California happy.

That's my best guess.

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...