Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

wheelie help

Recommended Posts

I've got a CRF230F and weigh about 200 lbs. Very noob. The only way I seem to be able to get the front end up is to stop, rev the snot out of it, dump the clutch, and jerk back on the bars as hard as I can. By this point maintaining the wheelie for any useful amount of time seems impossible. I've either overdone it and have to tap the rear brake, or under I've underdone it and look like a jackass. Getting the front airborne while moving looks even more retarded. Is the bike underpowered for my weight or am I doing something fundamentally wrong? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That bike is going to be harder to power wheelie as it only has 16 HP. Are you shifting back on the seat? Traction conditions? If the wheel is spinning that is gonna defeat the wheelie. I have a friend with one and he pulled one up in first with just throttle. He weighs about 180 and it surprised him (i think) how high it actually went.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've got a CRF230F and weigh about 200 lbs. Very noob. The only way I seem to be able to get the front end up is to stop, rev the snot out of it, dump the clutch, and jerk back on the bars as hard as I can. By this point maintaining the wheelie for any useful amount of time seems impossible. I've either overdone it and have to tap the rear brake, or under I've underdone it and look like a jackass. Getting the front airborne while moving looks even more retarded. Is the bike underpowered for my weight or am I doing something fundamentally wrong? :)

Try compressing the fork before wheelie: tap the front brake, compress the fork, then use the rebound to assist gettin the front up. Lean way back with your upper body, butt back, and keep your arms closer to straight than bent 90*.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned by taking Shane Watts class. He started beginners (like me) from a full stop/standing position. You start with your left foot on the ground, butt cheeks slid back towards the back of the seat, and your right foot on the brake. It helps if you are on flat or slightly uphill incline. Then you rev-up about half throttle and dump the clutch (but you don't just let go, control the release). The front should jump right up without any need to pull up. Just be ready for the surprise and hold on, ready to tap the rear brake. I was able to do this after about 15 minutes of repeated efforts. Now I can do it from a riding/seated position so long as I am going pretty slow. The next step is to learn how to wheelie from a standing postion. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'm on the right track then. More practice on controlling that clutch dump is what I seem to need. As far as using just the throttle to pop up while riding, In think I'll have to do the uncorking power mod to even come close to doing that. I've tried that in various parts of the rev range in first and second with my butt literally hanging off the back fender (barely able to grab the bars) and get nowhere unless I pump the clutch to get the RPM's up first. Back tire does spin a bit almost regardless of terrain, but I've heard the stock tires on this bike suck. I just need to find a wide open field with very little traffic and practice until my helmet wears out. Thanks all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

something I would consider doing is installing a bigger rear sprocket. I had this problem on my 04 YZ125 (turns out it was improperly jetted which was what was causing the power loss) before I realized that I purchased a 52T rear sprocket. If your not hitting your bikes top speed regulary then I think this would probably help you some. Even though proper jetting got my bike where it was supposed to be power wise, the bigger rear sprocket allows me to pull the wheel in 1-4 as long as I am on the pipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

push down on the forks as if your preloading, right when the forks want to come back up pull back and pin it. no clutch required. idk if this will work on a crf230. i have never rode one. its worth a try though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
push down on the forks as if your preloading, right when the forks want to come back up pull back and pin it. no clutch required. idk if this will work on a crf230. i have never rode one. its worth a try though

This is how I wheelie on my XR200R.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Learn to clutch it up into a wheelie right from the get-go. I find it much more controlled than all the fork compress, pull, lots of throttle etc. techniques. The less you have to jostle your body and the bike around, the easier it is to get into a balanced position.

Controlled throttle + controlled clutch = smooth lift to a controlled wheelie: on any bike.

IMHO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take out the baffle and try and get some more bark. I became a master at wheeling honda CRF's. Many have come through my garage. 80,100,150,230 and none of them were mine. They were all left for extended periods of time so they became the stunt bike. I learned how to wheelie in steps. This is how I taught myself and I still do this with every bike I try and ride wheelies on.

1. To try and really get a good feel for how the bike comes up, get going extremely slowly in first gear, almost stall. Take your feet on off the pegs and let them drag on the ground, for a split second plant your legs on the ground and goose it. Let the bike do a wheelie until you think it will flip. Then let it drop. Then do it a few times. This way you know how the bike will come up. I do this all the way up to third gear, and then try and ride with your legs dragging down so you get used to the sensation and so you can find the balance point.

2. After becoming an awesome legs on ground wheelie person try it with your feet on the pegs. Start slow and work your way up. This step takes a long time and you will fall, so find an open grass field. Try and pick it up in every gear you can. Compress the forks and pull back as hard as you can while giving the bike good throttle. Just keep practicing. And once you get good at wheeling like that, it's important to learn how to cover the rear brake and how to use the clutch to pick up the front end. But take one step at a time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
something I would consider doing is installing a bigger rear sprocket. I had this problem on my 04 YZ125 (turns out it was improperly jetted which was what was causing the power loss) before I realized that I purchased a 52T rear sprocket. If your not hitting your bikes top speed regulary then I think this would probably help you some. Even though proper jetting got my bike where it was supposed to be power wise, the bigger rear sprocket allows me to pull the wheel in 1-4 as long as I am on the pipe.

Sacrifice top speed for more low end torque, nice idea. I've never topped my bike out on the trails I like to ride, in fact I barely use 6th gear. I'm always looking for a lower gear to crawl with anyway. I think I'll do that for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your knobbies are rounded you can flip (change rotating direction) the tire to get more traction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The whole bike (including the tires) is almost brand new, but the Pirelli's that come stock are a little sub-par I think. I'm about to get some Maxxis I/T's to go on it. I went out in a field by my house earlier today to practice. Throttle alone still gets me nowhere, but I got to where I can get the front end up by working the throttle and the clutch together. A few attempts at it and I've already bought myself a pair of aftermarket handlebars and learned to straighten twisted forks and triple clamps. Maybe these bars are more wheelie wipeout resistant. I was looking at the sky in a rather surprised way and it seemed like all of the sudden the rear brake lever I was trying to step on hopped off the side of the bike and hid in the grass somewhere. Funny how your failsafe plan gets complicated when you're in the middle of flipping over backwards. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If a 14 year old can wheelie his 150 you can wheelie your 230.

I learned to wheelie in 1st gear just to see how fast the wheel would come up.

Start off going really slow in 2nd gear and rev the engine to about half throttle.

I dump the clutch, pull back hard, and shift to 3rd when I run out of revs. Its as simple as that.

sit back some too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only way I seem to be able to get the front end up is to stop, rev the snot out of it, dump the clutch, and jerk back on the bars as hard as I can.

hmm...looks like you have other problems to worry about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
. I was looking at the sky in a rather surprised way and it seemed like all of the sudden the rear brake lever I was trying to step on hopped off the side of the bike and hid in the grass somewhere. Funny how your failsafe plan gets complicated when you're in the middle of flipping over backwards. :)

I like the way you describe it. It sounds more funny than scary in words... Brake lever hiding in the grass ROTFLMOA!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you guys say pop the clutch do you mean.

1. while rolling slow pull in the clutch all the way rev it and let it snap from under your fingers?

2. while rolling slow pull in the clutch and as you let it out rev it slightly and just let the clutch out till it grabs?

I have tried a couple of ways including just cranking the throttle open I think I may be spinning even seated as far back as possible because my kenda is starting to round the knobs off.

Thanks for the help William.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys are ALL on the wrong track. I hate to be the bully here, but I think you guys need to stop worrying about wheelies. Let them come naturally with seat time and experience. You should all be working on speed, technique, and other essentials. A XR100, even with stock gearing and baffle, is MORE than powerful enough for a 300+ pound man to wheelie (as long as he is experienced).

Just go ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...