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tubes... patching

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I'm just questioning one of those given dirtbike rules.

"don't patch a tube, just replace it"

why???

Is there a solid reasoning for this? Or is it just another one of those things that somebody told somebody one day, it spread, and now it's written law?

The reasoning that "new tubes are cheap, and it's cheap insurance" isn't a very solid answer. Yes it makes sense to a point, but I can patch a bicycle tube, and never have any problems with my patches failing. Is there an actual difference in bicycle tubes and motorcycle tubes? You may say that dirtbikes are heavier. But then again when's the last time you aired up a dirtbike tire to 30psi or even more.

If there is an answer that actually makes sense, then yes, I can add it to my "rule book". I just hate having rules because "he said so". Half the time I've figured out the "he" doesn't really know what the hell he's talking about.

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I patch bicycle tubes till they look like something out of a cartoon, no problems with upwards of 120lbs in them.

Only tried patching a motorcycle tube once but had no luck. It was a Kenda "Tuff Tube", one of those heavy duty, thick, offroad tubes. Held overnite, no leak, then when I put it in the tire the next day it went to leaking.:)

I undoubtably didn't do it right, but was too much work wrestling the double beadlock bastage to try it again, so I put a new one in and went on.

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I usually replace the tube if I have time on my bike. On my sons 50, it gets the patch. I only patch the tubes 2 times and then they get replaced. It seems that the patches stick to the tire after time. That causes them to rip off if the tire spins at all. However, I have patched tubes on my bike as well. It all depends on time and money. I have no set rules!

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I'm just questioning one of those given dirtbike rules.

"don't patch a tube, just replace it"

why???

Is there a solid reasoning for this? Or is it just another one of those things that somebody told somebody one day, it spread, and now it's written law?

The reasoning that "new tubes are cheap, and it's cheap insurance" isn't a very solid answer. Yes it makes sense to a point, but I can patch a bicycle tube, and never have any problems with my patches failing. Is there an actual difference in bicycle tubes and motorcycle tubes? You may say that dirtbikes are heavier. But then again when's the last time you aired up a dirtbike tire to 30psi or even more.

If there is an answer that actually makes sense, then yes, I can add it to my "rule book". I just hate having rules because "he said so". Half the time I've figured out the "he" doesn't really know what the hell he's talking about.

but, dirtbikes gnawing around on terrain not fit to walk on, miles from home, and riding on a flat ruining the sidewalls of a 70.00 tire, are under different conditions than a bicycle you can sling on your shoulder and carry home, not to mention fighting a hard ass d952 110 tire bead over and over again, scratching the rim finish, also streching the beads and cracking them, and rimlock finger pinching assembly and ride down time, just the general stuff, says replace the tube, for the 15.00 bucks its just not worth it. thats why, do you need more?

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I'm just questioning one of those given dirtbike rules.

"don't patch a tube, just replace it"

why???

Is there a solid reasoning for this? Or is it just another one of those things that somebody told somebody one day, it spread, and now it's written law?

The reasoning that "new tubes are cheap, and it's cheap insurance" isn't a very solid answer. Yes it makes sense to a point, but I can patch a bicycle tube, and never have any problems with my patches failing. Is there an actual difference in bicycle tubes and motorcycle tubes? You may say that dirtbikes are heavier. But then again when's the last time you aired up a dirtbike tire to 30psi or even more.

If there is an answer that actually makes sense, then yes, I can add it to my "rule book". I just hate having rules because "he said so". Half the time I've figured out the "he" doesn't really know what the hell he's talking about.

I change mine becuse pushing a motorcycle sucks throught the sand 30miles.cheap insurance.I can carry a bicycle easy.the way my luck is the patch will fail as far away from the truck as possable.so for me it piece of mind:excuseme:

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Just use a tube. I am not at all against patches, but I use them just if I don't have any spare tubes. I had a front flat (a pinch flat I'm sure it was) in an Enduro and had to finish 12 miles on it. Not very fun :D

When using a new tube, you know it's fresh. And the odds of the patch failing is completely eliminated as there is no patch.

It's just a more secure method, and totally worth 10 bucks for a fresh set of tubes. And those rubber cement patches often lead to more stress than what they are worth! Half a tube of cement, hours in the sun, Over complusively checking to see if it is drying correctly.

You could start changing your tube immediately with a new tube, instead of waiting for the patch to dry and that my friend is more riding time. :worthy::)

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Just use a tube. I am not at all against patches, but I use them just if I don't have any spare tubes. I had a front flat (a pinch flat I'm sure it was) in an Enduro and had to finish 12 miles on it. Not very fun :D

When using a new tube, you know it's fresh. And the odds of the patch failing is completely eliminated as there is no patch.

It's just a more secure method, and totally worth 10 bucks for a fresh set of tubes. And those rubber cement patches often lead to more stress than what they are worth! Half a tube of cement, hours in the sun, Over complusively checking to see if it is drying correctly.

You could start changing your tube immediately with a new tube, instead of waiting for the patch to dry and that my friend is more riding time. :worthy::)

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Just use a tube. I am not at all against patches, but I use them just if I don't have any spare tubes. I had a front flat (a pinch flat I'm sure it was) in an Enduro and had to finish 12 miles on it. Not very fun :D

When using a new tube, you know it's fresh. And the odds of the patch failing is completely eliminated as there is no patch.

It's just a more secure method, and totally worth 10 bucks for a fresh set of tubes. And those rubber cement patches often lead to more stress than what they are worth! Half a tube of cement, hours in the sun, Over complusively checking to see if it is drying correctly.

You could start changing your tube immediately with a new tube, instead of waiting for the patch to dry and that my friend is more riding time. :worthy::)

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i dont ever patch push bike or motor bike tubes, they never seem to stick and its alot easier to put a new 1 in whilst you got the tire off

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i,d consider the terrain. if its fairly benign as in no thorn trees,sharp rock and such,a patched tube may last a long time. if you,re into knarly stuff,put in a heavy duty tube and use patch only to get rollin, again.

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I have never had a problem patching tubes I don't think. I usually put in a new tube with new tires anyway, and using the HD tubes.

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but, dirtbikes gnawing around on terrain not fit to walk on, miles from home, and riding on a flat ruining the sidewalls of a 70.00 tire, are under different conditions than a bicycle you can sling on your shoulder and carry home, not to mention fighting a hard ass d952 110 tire bead over and over again, scratching the rim finish, also streching the beads and cracking them, and rimlock finger pinching assembly and ride down time, just the general stuff, says replace the tube, for the 15.00 bucks its just not worth it. thats why, do you need more?

No... that's a decent answer. Less chance of hassle. But now I know for sure that if I need to patch instead of replace that it's fine.

I ask because everybodys I've ever talked to about it, is under the impression that a patch can't, and defanantly will not work. They've got a "rule with no explanation".

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No... that's a decent answer. Less chance of hassle. But now I know for sure that if I need to patch instead of replace that it's fine.

I ask because everybodys I've ever talked to about it, is under the impression that a patch can't, and defanantly will not work. They've got a "rule with no explanation".

one little comeback, when i replace tires usually once a year or so, i keep old tube if sevicable, put new tube in, and i always have a usable tube in stock.

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i had a flat a couple weeks ago.... fought with it for a hour to get the tire off.. Patched it... fought another hour putting it on... held over night road the next day it lasted about 15 minutes... and flat agian:foul: :D:)

there went another 2 hours fighting with it but this time we got a new tube.. good idea:prof:

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I would agree with the above. I am not into fighting a tire on and off only to have my patch fail. I grew up Mt. Biking and we never patched tubes. I don't like to push anything, pedal or motor. I also hate to change tires on either kind of bike, so I try to avoid it at all costs. i would say it is all up to you, no real good solid answer.

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I used to bust tires for a living, and I don't recommend that you patch a tube except as a "get-you-back-to-the-truck" fix. The rubber cement that is used doesn't really hold a patch on all that well, and the patch itself can be rubbed off the tube (yes, I've seen it happen) by the flexing of the tire when traveling over rough ground. If the patch stays on the tube, the tire can rub on the patch and create a microscopic channel that the air can flow out of. Patching a tube is not really a good, permanent fix. For that, you need a new tube.

Tubes are usually priced around 10 bucks each. When they're so cheap, why take a chance?

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