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i want an oil that id never have to change... that would be sweet.

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hmm...good info..until it turned into an ad for Redline!

Well, Amsoil has flooded the internet with their stuff, so it doesn't hurt to hear another opinion for a change!!!

It is important to note that the new generation of thumpers are more like a high reving Formula 1 engine than anything we ever had in the past, so clearly the quality of the oil we run is very important!

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hmm...good info..until it turned into an ad for Redline!

That's what I was thinking too.

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Well, Amsoil has flooded the internet with their stuff, so it doesn't hurt to hear another opinion for a change!!!

It is important to note that the new generation of thumpers are more like a high reving Formula 1 engine than anything we ever had in the past, so clearly the quality of the oil we run is very important!

OK now you've opened Pandora's box!:)

I love this paragraph right here:

By the early 1970s, the use of the PAO synthetic lubricants in competition engines was allowing reduction of the amount of oil carried on board race cars, combined with smaller de-aeration systems and reduction in cooler size. The Cosworth DFV Formula 1 engine could then rev to over 10,000 rpm with no fear of lubricant breakdown and the road car market for the first time had lubricant technology that was running ahead of engine development rather than lagging behind. For road car use, the viscosity modified mineral oils of the time, helped by the development of cheap high temperature detergents, gave adequate protection, if a little short lived. Brake horse power per litre of the average road car was around 55, compared to the 170 bhp/litre of the formula 1 engine, significantly, again around a third. Di-ester plastics were being used to strengthen mineral oils to make what the marketing men now call 'semi-synthetic' oils.

In the early 70's, who do you think was the company that introduced the first oil that could handle those demands? It sure wasn't Redline or Mobil 1.

Then there's this one:

There then followed two disastrous events, either of which should have signed the death warrant of synthetic oil. A high street oil company launched its major synthetic attack on the mineral oil market world-wide with a product containing an excellent anti-wear agent which as a sideline caused rubber oil seals to perish. At almost the same time, an equally famous name launched its own synthetic oil with a dreadful lack of EP protection, ironically lacking a decent anti-wear agent of which the other brand suffered too much. Both products suffered from very low viscosities at temperatures below 100°C, which did not suit older engine seals anyway, but, almost as an aside, were very good lubricants, far better than their mineral equivalents. Synthetics died an instant and frightful death. Twenty years later, oil salesmen across the globe, still wince as they are informed categorically that 'synthetics won't/can't/shan't go in my engine because they will blow it up/ruin the oil seals/fall out of every orifice.

The begining of the above paragraph was pretty much a direct blow against Amsoil. Thing is any true 100% synthetic (PAO or ester) will leak from BAD oil seals.

I'm not getting into a debate which oil is better. The article DID have some excellent info in it. IMO it just didn't need the shameless product plug at the end though. I just wanted to share both sides since you brought up Amsoil.

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