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Tire pressure, quick answer.

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How many psi should i run in my rear? I ride mud and rocky-hard packed.

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I would go 13 or 14 if you do both at the same time so ya dont get a pinch flat. It depends on the ratio of mud-rocks. You might have to suffer in 1 part to gain in another.

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Well, all-around, its about 50/50, i wanted a tire pressure to where i wouldn't get pinches but still soft enough for the mud and things. Thanks

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Around here, pretty much everything except lots of sand(unless you go to the beach) or moab type slick rock people seem to run 8-13#, and the super fast hard hitters maybe 14-15(with dry and rock). I've got 12#front 10# back, seems to work well when I hit the mud pits that still lurk deep in the forest. Last spring my husband had me at 16# F/B and that was utter complete total disaster in the mud and wet...that's when I discovered the concept of tire pressure and took matters into my own hands:bonk:

I haven't gotten a pinch flat yet (knock on wood!) but I try to keep the front end light and hop up over things, not slam into them hard. Though I'm sure if you weigh more you might want more pressure. My kids are light and they hit stuff hard and they've never had a pinch flat.

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12 psi front and rear unless very muddy then 11psi front and 10psi rear.

IMO,

Dwight

Dwight, Your opinion is huge! We listen when you talk/type.:)

Eric

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I was told by a much more experienced rider than I that higher pressure (>12 PSI or so) is responsible for plucking the lugs off the edges of my tires. Is there any truth to this? I was trying to keep 15 PSI at the time.

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How much do you weigh ? I ride a yz250f and weigh 150 with gear on and I run 10psi f&r on the mx track and 12psi f&r in the woods / rocks never had a flat ( yet ).

Robert

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From memory,

Jeremy McGrath was a 12 psi front and rear fan.

Your tire pressure choice can really vary depending on what you are try to do.

Tire pressure is an incredible tool to change bike performance to meet specific objectives. lighter riders can get away with much lower pressures than heavier riders. Tire patch contact size is a function of total weight on the tire and pressure.

Slow technical trail riding is far easier with lower tire pressures. I learned this from one of my riding friends who lives Maui and San Diego (poor guy). He weighs 230 and runs 11 front, and 7 rear on both his KTM450 and KTM300 for the slippery stuff. I have also seen him ride our stuff (sharp edged rocks both fixed and loose) in So Cal with the same pressures. He picks his lines well and is able to complete the steeper sections at lower speeds due to his improved traction. Note that trials riders often use pressures below 4 psi.

The other very useful trick is use heavy duty tubes with at least 4 ounces of slime in them. The slime is not for puncture protection, but to lubricate the inside of the tube to prevent pinch flats. I've used this set up for the last two years over more than 10,000 miles of riding and have not suffered a pinch flat. These miles include a couple of "Big Bear Run" finisher plaques.

I agree that the lower pressures suggested here are not appropriate for racing, but if you find yourself stuck at the bottom of a hill that you can't seem to get up, and you really don't want to spend the night down there, try dumping your rear tire pressure down to 8 psi and give a go. You will likely be pleasantly surprised and make it home for dinner on time.

RH

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12 front, 10 rear for all conditions except very slick/muddy: I then run as low at 4-5psi rear and around 10 front....... HD or UHD tubes only at those very low pressures.

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All depending on the tire and the conditions, 13 front and 10 rear.

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How much do you weigh ? I ride a yz250f and weigh 150 with gear on and I run 10psi f&r on the mx track and 12psi f&r in the woods / rocks never had a flat ( yet ).

Robert

If I sit around and eat M&Ms for a week, I weigh about 160-165. When I lay off the Ms, I drop to the 150s. Most of the riding I do is on colossally hard Arkansas clay which turns to mondo slippery goo when it is wet. There are lots sections that have crushed up shale and modest sized rocks. I have been riding 10 PSI since the advice was given, and have had few unexpected traction problems.

Knock wood, I have never had a hole in the tube. What usually happens is the lugs on the edge of the tire start cracking at the base, and they just snap off somewhere in the woods.

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If I sit around and eat M&Ms for a week, I weigh about 160-165. When I lay off the Ms, I drop to the 150s. Most of the riding I do is on colossally hard Arkansas clay which turns to mondo slippery goo when it is wet. There are lots sections that have crushed up shale and modest sized rocks. I have been riding 10 PSI since the advice was given, and have had few unexpected traction problems.

Knock wood, I have never had a hole in the tube. What usually happens is the lugs on the edge of the tire start cracking at the base, and they just snap off somewhere in the woods.

Glad to hear you found a good pressure that works for you. What tires are you using ? I run dunlops and do not have a problem with tires losing lugs ?

Robert

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Hi all,

I'm learning, I weigh 245, ride a factory '08 KLX450R - no mods.

Today I'm sore all over 👍 good stuff, after yesterdays experience at Brown's Camp.

The hard dirt becomes slick as snot and 14 psi in both front/rear makes me feel like I'm on ice as soon as I leave a rut and cross over the center hump, or turn in similiar situations.

Guess I'll go with the suggestion of 13front / 10rear.

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Hi all,

I'm learning, I weigh 245, ride a factory '08 KLX450R - no mods.

Today I'm sore all over 👍 good stuff, after yesterdays experience at Brown's Camp.

The hard dirt becomes slick as snot and 14 psi in both front/rear makes me feel like I'm on ice as soon as I leave a rut and cross over the center hump, or turn in similiar situations.

Guess I'll go with the suggestion of 13front / 10rear.

Just keep messing with psi. you will get it right. I ride with a presure guage, and will change psi till I like what i feel, just dont go too low while riding, or you will be adding air. Good Luck!

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Just keep messing with psi. you will get it right. I ride with a presure guage, and will change psi till I like what i feel, just dont go too low while riding, or you will be adding air. Good Luck!

I've been known to pack a CO2 inflater with me and lower rear tire pressure to 2-4lbs for some hill climb sections where it's practically impossible to make the climb in the winter months, and then reinflate to 5-8lbs at the top of the climb.

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What would you guys suggest for mx and sx inwhich is a hard slick surface around here in kansas? Also my rear tire is a 120/90/19 if that matters. thx:banana:

I weigh 185lb on a 450 Intermediate rider

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It is generally accepted to use between 12-14psi, front and back in the majority of conditions to maximize both traction and decrease the chance of puncture.

If it is only rocks then you may want to go up to 16psi. Higher than this will start having a negative affect on your bike control and safety due to decreased traction.

When it is just mud you may want to go down to as low as 8-9psi. This provides far greater traction but also obviously significantly increases your risk of a puncture. A lower psi setting than this will greatly decrease the control of your bike due to the tire walls "rolling" from a lack inflation.

Shane Watts

Dirt Wise Academy of Offroad Riding school

www.shanewatts.com

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