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wr45f-07 shock question


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I want my shock to handle small bumps, rocks up to 4-6 inches but also dont want to loose bottoming resistance ,like jumps .

Do i then pick from the bigger shim(1) or from the taperd area(2) ,when thats done i mayby need to speed up the rebound also pick from 3 or 4?

compstack.jpg

comp stack

rebstack.jpg

rebound stack

I also discovered that my bladder was broke or should it look like this?

I just squeezed on it and heard a leak and it just popped apart???🙂

bladder.jpg

thank allot for advise Henric

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I want my shock to handle small bumps, rocks up to 4-6 inches but also dont want to loose bottoming resistance ,like jumps .

Do i then pick from the bigger shim(1)

take off from #1 and/or use less thicker ones as well

when thats done i mayby need to speed up the rebound

why? i'd leave the rebound as is

I also discovered that my bladder was broke or should it look like this?

I just squeezed on it and heard a leak and it just popped apart???

i don't see anything unusual.

What exactly do you mean with broke?

That cap and bladder are two seperate pieces? That's the way it should be.

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Is there any advantage or performace gains i polish/smooth the edges on the piston.?

There is very rough edges where i have marked on the picture below (and i have small grinders ,just like dentist tools at my work do it with).

Should i leave it alone ?

shockpiston1mod.JPG

shockpiston2mod.JPG

thanks again Henric

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Thinking about it, it does make sense (smoothing the oil flow, les turbulences [cavitation]).

whether it's that much of a benefit i cannot tell from my own experience and is way beyond my knowledge in liquid phyics...

But there are people out there who are doing it. take a look at this thread

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good job, i dont really understand why those edges are left behind, maybe it just costs too much to hand finish them? you would think the speed at which the shaft moves, that it would make a difference to turbulance?

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There is no bleedhole in the sealhead ? How do i do?

👍

Just drill small (2-3mm) hole below the o-ring on the seal head on the end that faces the piston. Just look at the obvious area to drill and don`t hit the seal or top out bumper mounted in the seal head..

Pretend that YOU are the air, trying to escape the dark recesses of the shocks body upon the seal packs insertion and you will find your path(to drill):worthy:

Fluid dynamics 101.5:ride:

Nice piston porting by the way. If you ever decide to go for more flow by enlarging the ports, remember to increase your damping at the shim stacks.

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Notice how the piston surface is worn more on the outside and not in the middle?

I know there has been discussions before on whether to surface or not surface pistons and whether they are actually flat or not.

Well I'm a big believer on NOT surfacing them and I think your pic shows that they are not flat and come slightly "cupped" from the factory. I also grind and smooth out the flow path on pistons from time to time thinking that it has to help but have never seen any documentation to prove it.

doc

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thinking that it has to help but have never seen any documentation to prove it.

that's the point

from pure thinking about it a less restricted oil flow should result in a smoother and/or more efficient flow (less turbulences).

It's like a river with a natural bank/bed where all these obsticals and the unsteadinesses brake the water flow and cause turbulences

and by contrast a canal with flows in a concrete bed.

At least that's the picture i have...

But as doc said, i'd really love to have a comparison between those two.

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Notice how the piston surface is worn more on the outside and not in the middle?

I know there has been discussions before on whether to surface or not surface pistons and whether they are actually flat or not.

Well I'm a big believer on NOT surfacing them and I think your pic shows that they are not flat and come slightly "cupped" from the factory. I also grind and smooth out the flow path on pistons from time to time thinking that it has to help but have never seen any documentation to prove it.

doc

Could the wear pattern just be the effective clamp shim dia? That's the only part of the shims that are flexing...it's not gonna wear the area the shims are clamped solid right?

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Could the wear pattern just be the effective clamp shim dia? That's the only part of the shims that are flexing...it's not gonna wear the area the shims are clamped solid right?

Well that could be part of it but if you try and surface a piston it will start the wear on the outside edges first and take some sanding to get it flat.

doc

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