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Fork Seals Leaking.

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Hey,

My right fork is leaking. So bad now there is a puddle the next day on the floor. I called the Honda dealer, $260 for labor, $50 for parts and $20 for oil. Ripoff? YA! I really don't wanna try and do this one. Where can I take it for less then thats? What is the price for a fork job? Probably both, I hear its good to do both.

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the process is very straight forward..it really isnt too difficult..i do it to my forks every year(change and inspect seals, bushings,etc)...not the shock because of the nitrogen....all you will need is either a good service manual or a good online tutorial that will guide u step by step...you can search rockymountainmc on youtube and it will come up with a few of there how to do vids...but if u dnt really want to do it yourself...you can probably send it out to lets say factory connection to have the oil change which is only 55 buks...the rebuild is 95 i believe..but i bet you can ask to just swap out the seals during the oil change

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For $330.00 (total of the figures you quoted) you can get the replacement seals, tools, motopower fork vid, a vice & the RaceTech fork holding tool (vice insert) and oil and become your own suspension guy never again needing ANYONE to do the work for you. I don’t mean or intend to insult and pro suspension guys here, but fork oil (changing) and seals ‘n stuf is semi-mindless work. Yeah, there’s several parts in there and yeah, I kinda screwed the pooch a bit my first time @ it, but once I got it right, I stared at myself and wondered &%$#@!… people charge good $ to do this???

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That price is totally crazy. The shop is ripping you off big, big, big, big time.

A good suspension tuning shop would charge no where near that amount!

Learn how to do it yourself - cost you around $100 once you buy tools, parts and oil.

For an example, I usually do fork oil changes for $60 plus oil (20), they bring parts. Same thing for shock, $60 plus oil (10). They can take to dealer and get charged with 142 psi of nitrogen. (which costs 20). - it keeps me riding :) -- for friends and stuff, I just help them out :D A actual shop will probably be around double this.

You should service (oil change) in forks/shock every 40 hrs max, sooner the better from a performance stand point.

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That price is totally crazy. The shop is ripping you off big, big, big, big time.

A good suspension tuning shop would charge no where near that amount!

Learn how to do it yourself - cost you around $100 once you buy tools, parts and oil.

For an example, I usually do fork oil changes for $60 plus oil (20), they bring parts. Same thing for shock, $60 plus oil (10). They can take to dealer and get charged with 142 psi of nitrogen. (which costs 20). A actual shop will probably be around double this.

You should service (oil change) in forks/shock every 40 hrs max, sooner the better from a performance stand point.

i usually only do the forks myself..but how was it with the shock..i have the tools and i know what i would be doing...just a little scared with relieving the pressure? but i might just do it after myself after the season...got any tips for me

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The shock really isn't that hard to do... Had one completely disassembled to put in a new seal in, not bad at all. The showa stuff is straight forward and easy (atleast I found) The shock is probably more simple than the forks...

1) measure the spring length - that way it is easy to re set sag

2) remove spring

3) release nitro pressure with screw driver - its just like an tire valve.

4) remove the high/low speed compression dampening assembly

5) pump out old shock oil

6) re fill with some good shock oil

7) fill until just below the threads for the adjuster

8) stroke the shock shaft, rotating it a little it each stroke until no bubbles come up, add oil as needed

9) with the oil at the proper level as stated earlier remove the shock from the vise and tilt it upright, (keep hand over hole) - that way the oil will fill into the bladder area. keep doing this until no airbubles come up.

10) make sure you are at proper oil level

11) fill bladder with 10 psi of air, hold a towel over the hole, oil will over flow a bit.

12) with oil at the bottom of adjuster threads, put in the cap, tighten it.

13) You can fill up with as close to 140 psi of air as you can and stroke the shock shaft to make sure it goes smoothly, etc.

14) release all air

15) take to dealer to get charged with 142 psi of nitrogen

16) install and ride. :)

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OK, What is a list of EVERYTHING I need?

Included maybe even part # for the OEM Seals.

i suggest buying the tools first and reading or watching vids on how to do it and a step by step explanation...and maybe even refer to a diagram that way you can see both on paper and in the video..rockymountainmc on youtube makes a good how to vid for the twin chamber forks......you will need a fork cap wrench (one that can also take off the base valve assembly), seal driver, standard wrenches (have one small enough to hold the piston rod), standard sockets, fork oil...

you might even be lucky and it might just be a dirty dust seal...but if not you would need new oil seals and maybe or maybe not new bushings

here ya go

if you have cartridge style forks which i assum you dnt b/c most showa or kayaba have twin chamber forks but if you do click on their how to vid with cartridge forks

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The shock really isn't that hard to do... Had one completely disassembled to put in a new seal in, not bad at all. The showa stuff is straight forward and easy (atleast I found) The shock is probably more simple than the forks...

1) measure the spring length - that way it is easy to re set sag

2) remove spring

3) release nitro pressure with screw driver - its just like an tire valve.

4) remove the high/low speed compression dampening assembly

5) pump out old shock oil

6) re fill with some good shock oil

7) fill until just below the threads for the adjuster

8) stroke the shock shaft, rotating it a little it each stroke until no bubbles come up, add oil as needed

9) with the oil at the proper level as stated earlier remove the shock from the vise and tilt it upright, (keep hand over hole) - that way the oil will fill into the bladder area. keep doing this until no airbubles come up.

10) make sure you are at proper oil level

11) fill bladder with 10 psi of air, hold a towel over the hole, oil will over flow a bit.

12) with oil at the bottom of adjuster threads, put in the cap, tighten it.

13) You can fill up with as close to 140 psi of air as you can and stroke the shock shaft to make sure it goes smoothly, etc.

14) release all air

15) take to dealer to get charged with 142 psi of nitrogen

16) install and ride. :)

ok if it releases smoothly like a tire valve then thats ok ...i thought all 150 psi would come shootin out and my shock would start to fly lik ein the cartoons:bonk:

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You will need 2 fork seal kits (each kit comes with dust/oil seal) part number 51490-MEN-003

I personally would also replace the bushings as well. Worn bushings can cause too much play between the fork tube and fork body, thus wearing out the new seals. I don't have the part numbers on hand for those, there are two per fork.

Then you need a fork cap wrench

Holder tool for the end of the damper rod - so you can un bolt it.

Fork seal driver

1 1/4 inch socket (same as rear axle) to remove the inner chamber cap, so you can change that oil as well.

Rockymountains Tusk brand makes a lot of these fork tools for cheaper than the rest out there.

If I missed anything, let me know.

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yup thats what i use...tusk makes all the suspension tools you will need for the job..the vid shows you the tools rockymountain carries

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OK, So for ONE fork there is one Dust seal, one Oil seal, and how many bushings/bearings? I just bought a:foul: 32MM for the rear axle. Thought it was an 1 1/4. Anyways, Lemme get this right:

2 Seal kits

Bearings? idk on the Motosport OEM parts? Do you guys like OEM over aftermarket?

Fork Oil, What weight?

Tools

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Per fork there is one dust seal and one oil seal.

There are two bushings in each fork - (each one is different)

If the 32mm socket fits the rear axle, it will fit the fork inner chamber.

Maxima Racing 5 wt fork oil, you need just over 1L of it, so 2 bottles.

Tools:

Fork cap wrench

Fork seal driver, 47 mm

Tool to hold the end of the damper rod when unbolting it.

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Thanks Chris, Those are great. Alright, I have this link from the 07 250R OEM part of Motsport where I will be ordering all this stuff. Gotta love that free 2nd day air!!!

OK,

http://www.motosport.com/offroad/oem.php?make=HONDA&type=DIRT&model=CRF250R&year=2007&groupId=44032

I hope this shows up. Could someone please tell me what numbers on that list and the quantity I need? Then I think I will either get Tusk or Motion Pro tools then Belray Fork oil. I have belray in my Harley, My chain and my air filter. Love it.

Thanks guys! btw Motosport is out of some of these parts 👍 So I'll order them asap. Thanks!!

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I wouldn't use belray in your forks, that oil as I've read works good for the first 10 or so hrs then doesn't -- it gets broken down fast. I have Maxima racing fork fluid 5 wt in my forks and it works great, I am at over 30 hrs now. Don't wanna get too many more, hope I can get the stuff from Dave 👍

Here are the part no's that you need:

Fork seal kit X2 51490-MEN-003

Bushing guide X2 51414-KZ3-B01

Bushing slider X2 51415-KZ3-B01

Then you need a fork seal driver - 47mm

Fork cap wrench

Then that tool that I do not know the technical name of -- it holds the bottom of the damper rod so you can un bolt the bottom fork bolt from it.

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OK, I'm getting my order together and found ONE fork seal driver for $60! Crazy? Idk, but its a Motion Pro. I kinda want to get this all at Motosport. What is this thing supposed to cost?

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Buy it once and fugedaboutit. That's a key tool. I'm sure others have homemade ways of driving the seals, but I'm a purpose-built tool kinda guy. You can really only use that driver for one thing, but it does it perfectly well. It's the same one I have.

I also have the RT rod holding tool that 250F rider pictured. Again, a simple tool to make for some, but I don't have the resourses to make tools. A 12mm open end wrench works fine too, but I like the RT tool.

Tell you what Ricky... get good at it and you'll be changing the fork oil for all your buddies in no time. Charge 'em some nominal fee that make is worth it for them and you. You could easily end up covering moto fuel, tires, some track fees, etc. w/ just a few "buddy rate" changes and some word of mouth exposure.

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