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Sag adjustment by yourself?

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Does anyone know a way to measure your sag by yourself? I know about the ASV solo sag scale , but don't have an extra c-note to throw down on it. I live in the sticks and I need to get my sag adjusted to 108mm per Factory Connection. If you have any helpfull tips I would appreciate it. Thanks.

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I use a long rod, bottom end bent 90 degrees to insert it into the rear axle. then I use a small screw clamp to hold a bracket on the rear fender. the rod is going through a bore in the bracket and a tie zip on the rod indicates the travel. thats it :)

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I use a long rod, bottom end bent 90 degrees to insert it into the rear axle. then I use a small screw clamp to hold a bracket on the rear fender. the rod is going through a bore in the bracket and a tie zip on the rod indicates the travel. thats it :D

This ^ isn't even as hard as you need to make this. Just get any straight surface (board, wall, whatever your redneck heart desires) and make a measurement while off the bike using a ruler or straight edge laid flat on the seat and mark the wall, pole, whatever. Now sit on the bike keeping the ruler in place and mark the wall again at the lower measurement. Measure this distance in between after you get off the bike and adjust accordingly. Enjoy!

PS. If you use a broom handle or something for this, try the zip-ty idea but make sure they're snug and don't move as you get off the bike since you are trying to get this adjustment down to a specific millimeter. This will allow you to make multiple adjustments without sharpie marks all over your parents / wife's kitchen tools :) .

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also after you measure your race sag....depending on how much preload was added or taken off you should check the static sag...because the change in preload will offset the static sag and the static sag will tell you if the spring rates are correct for your weight...just a helpful tip....usually adding too much preload (tension) this will make the bike sag less on its own weight..an indication you need stiffer springs..and vise versa..if u take off preload, this will make the bike squat more under its own weight and thats an indication that you need lighter springs....

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Now sit on the bike keeping the ruler in place and mark the wall again at the lower measurement.

sit on the bike and mark something behind you :) no, thanks, I prefer mine :D

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sit on the bike and mark something behind you :) no, thanks, I prefer mine :D

This may come as a shock but if you sit down (such as on a chair, bench, the floor, toilet, whatever you wanna use for sake of argument) and keep your legs still while turning your shoulders left or right, you can actually SEE things behind you! It's nuts but just try it! :worthy:

In all seriousness, I won't get bent out of shape if you just mark it beside you on the wall, It's not like I meant directly behind you in line with the rear fender haha.

I'm sure the OP will find a convenient way to do this, it's not rocket science.

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ok, I will visit him at the hospital if he cuts his finger while sawing the rod and you will visit him if he gets injured because he fell off the bike while turning his shoulder to see what the hell the sag could be :D:)

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This ^ isn't even as hard as you need to make this. Just get any straight surface (board, wall, whatever your redneck heart desires) and make a measurement while off the bike using a ruler or straight edge laid flat on the seat and mark the wall, pole, whatever. Now sit on the bike keeping the ruler in place and mark the wall again at the lower measurement. Measure this distance in between after you get off the bike and adjust accordingly. Enjoy!

PS. If you use a broom handle or something for this, try the zip-ty idea but make sure they're snug and don't move as you get off the bike since you are trying to get this adjustment down to a specific millimeter. This will allow you to make multiple adjustments without sharpie marks all over your parents / wife's kitchen tools :) .

Sounds great in theory, but there is noway to know if your bike is leaning a few mm one way or the other.

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I use a long rod, bottom end bent 90 degrees to insert it into the rear axle. then I use a small screw clamp to hold a bracket on the rear fender. the rod is going through a bore in the bracket and a tie zip on the rod indicates the travel. thats it :)

Good idea, explain what you use on the rear fender.

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Good idea, explain what you use on the rear fender.

I use a 3mm aluminium plate, approx 1 inch wide, 3 inch long. stay behind your bike and look at the side of the rear fender, it has an angle of 60°, 45° or whatever. now bend the aluminium plate that angle so one side is clamped to the fender, the free side is horizontally. drill a hole in the free side (eg 9mm if you have an 8mm rod).

of course you can make that out of a piece of wood too...

sounds like a deal. you're driving though :D

how long will it take from pennsylvania to california? :)

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JUST AN FYI... BUT THERE IS A SAG TOOL FROM MSR FOR ABOUT $21.00!!! I have one, it makes it a whole lot easier than all of the other various ways posted!!!

Thanks that is the route i'll go.

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I use a 3mm aluminium plate, approx 1 inch wide, 3 inch long. stay behind your bike and look at the side of the rear fender, it has an angle of 60°, 45° or whatever. now bend the aluminium plate that angle so one side is clamped to the fender, the free side is horizontally. drill a hole in the free side (eg 9mm if you have an 8mm rod).

of course you can make that out of a piece of wood too...

how long will it take from pennsylvania to california? 👍

Thanks for getting back at me, much appreciated.

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If you have a spring that is too stiff for your weight, you'll find yourself reducing the preload (turning the nut rings CCW) to get the bike with you on it to sag a full 4 inches. Then, when you measure your static sag, it'll be too high, because you don't have enough preload to keep the bike by itself from sagging too much. Reverse that logic for a spring that is too soft for your weight. The rules of thumb go like this...

If you adjust your preload for a race sag of 100mm, then find your static sag is significantly above 30-40 mm, your spring is too stiff for your weight.

If you adjust your preload for a race sag of 100mm, then find your static sag is significantly below 30-40 mm, your spring is too soft for your weight.

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If I'm all by my lonely self, I just mount the bike in the other direction. In other words, I sit on it backwards.

Facing backwards does not change the position and placement of the mass of the rider, and it makes it a lot easier to take a reading regardless of what tooling you decide to work with.

If you're really good, you'll then kick-start the bike, with your left leg, and take it for a spin, keeping an eye on where you have just been.

There's no ruling in the AMA book that says you have to point your body one direction or the other. 👍

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some people shaking their heads about some of my ideas but this man is unbeatable...

if he get not caught to commit him to an institution he will be prayed by all showa and Kayaba engineers as the suspension guru from amerika :worthy:

I'm glad not to live un the US, I don't want to get passed by a man sitting backwards on his bike 👍

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