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Rocks, There every where

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Here in Colorado rocks are every where! what is the best technique for riding over rocks on the trail. Ones you cant advoid except for going over them. about the size of softballs. If you go to fast you worry about wiping out. But if you go to slow you rack your bean bag on the tank. HELP. Go Green :)

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Set your tire's PSI to ~13 at both ends, get off the seat, and keep your arse over the back-end to keep the front end as light as you can. Aim for the big rocks; they don't move around on you like the smaller ones...

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Well here in FL we don't have many rocks, but there is one race a year where they're (not there) everywhere. For that race, we usually make sure we have plenty of tire pressure, and heavy duty tubes. It is pretty much a given that I am standing on any part of the track with rocks. You need to keep your body in a very neutral, ready position.

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Like others are saying, stand up and be ready for anything. I read in a magazine quite a while ago that you should always look ahead and not worry about what is right in front of your tire as you are going to hit it anyway. Concentrate on what is up ahead and try to pick the best line. Try to stay away from the smaller rocks as they roll and change direction really quickly.

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Lots and Lots of rocks here in WV where I ride. Keep your eyes out ahead of you looking at the place where the bike is eventually going to be. If you look down you are going down. Ass up, eyes up, speed up, gear up. I ride a two stroke and in loose rocks and low speeds the tire spins and the rocks kick out the rear tire. But If you keep the speed up and lug the motor a little and let the bike float under you a little, you will go a lot farther with more confidence.

Soot

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I agree w/ drt bkr. tho on an incline I like to be at the tank a couple inches off the seat so the front end dosent get too light.

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Different rocks are going to act different (lava, basalt, granite, slate, shale), then there's loose or imbedded--you'll learn what you can go over offset or have to hit straight on. You just gotta let the bike move around, and think about being light, dont' smack stuff hard, look ahead, dont' fixate. You can practice going over small logs, all that stuff for popping up the front wheel. Standing up, going faster and being smooth on the throttle and having suspension set up nice is all good. Sitting down is a rougher ride.

And practice going over tricky rocks on purpose so if you get surprized you dont' get bucked off. I love rocks! Go blue! :)

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+1 for Steering damper---In maine there are rocks everywhere--wet, dry, big small---the steering damper makes it a blast--no more tank slappers---there are at least 8-10 wipeouts avoided this season since I added the damper---You do not notice it until you need it. Agree---gas and go---IMHO, best addition for off road riding---Brian

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As has been stated already, correct suspension set up and a steering damper helped a lot for me with the rocks in the California desert. The other thing is just practice and experience -- as you ride through more rock gardens, you'll get better at it.

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Lots and Lots of rocks here in WV where I ride. Keep your eyes out ahead of you looking at the place where the bike is eventually going to be. If you look down you are going down. Ass up, eyes up, speed up, gear up. I ride a two stroke and in loose rocks and low speeds the tire spins and the rocks kick out the rear tire. But If you keep the speed up and lug the motor a little and let the bike float under you a little, you will go a lot farther with more confidence.

Soot

You guys definitely have a lot of rocks on many of your trails in W. Va. The second week of May we road tripped up there to ride all day one Friday. My riding buddy and I were talking about how rocky it was on our way back to N.C. We also ride on some pretty rocky trails around here as well. Uwharrie National Forest has some extremely rocky trails in certain areas.

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You guys definitely have a lot of rocks on many of your trails in W. Va. The second week of May we road tripped up there to ride all day one Friday. My riding buddy and I were talking about how rocky it was on our way back to N.C. We also ride on some pretty rocky trails around here as well. Uwharrie National Forest has some extremely rocky trails in certain areas.

Thanks for coming up and riding in the Mountain State Ron , I hope you enjoyed yourself, and please come back again.

Soot

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Thanks for coming up and riding in the Mountain State Ron , I hope you enjoyed yourself, and please come back again.

Soot

We had an absolute blast up there! 👍 In fact, we are heading back up there to ride again soon. I take my family up there to snow ski in the winter--and we have been whitewater rafting up there as well. We always enjoy ourselves in your state!

Regarding the riding technique for the rocks, I totally agree with your technique on this one. I stand up, look up ahead, try to keep my speed up and have my butt positioned over the back of the seat. So far, so good. Now I need to work on jumping better when I hit the MX track every once in a while. Either that or just give up the 'air' altogether. lol

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Keep a good knee-grip too. Stay loose, but keep the bike connected to your body by getting a firm/comfortable squeeze on the tank.

Keep looking ahead and picking your next line past the "death rock", it will help you to recover and proceed if the rock does try to toss you.

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I rode a lot of rocks this weekend in MN. Softball, volleyball, basketball size - you name it. To top it off, the dirt in the area was ultra dry and turned to silt once you got a wheel spinning on any hill. Here's pic of my kid on his XR80 waiting for "assistance". This sucker was about a half mile long total with junk everywhere. Even in the crappy camera-phone shot you get the idea of the rocks:

jrinakeley.jpg

Just pick the cleanest line you can, stand up but stay low on the bike and let it move around. Hang on for the big hits!

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Lots and Lots of rocks here in WV where I ride. Keep your eyes out ahead of you looking at the place where the bike is eventually going to be. If you look down you are going down. Ass up, eyes up, speed up, gear up. I ride a two stroke and in loose rocks and low speeds the tire spins and the rocks kick out the rear tire. But If you keep the speed up and lug the motor a little and let the bike float under you a little, you will go a lot farther with more confidence.

Soot

Before I finished reading the original post, I was thinking of the Hatfield-McCoy trails. This spring was my third consecutive year of riding there. Lots of rocks is a severe understatement, especially at the Rockhouse trail system! (I hate trail #28!!!) :worthy:

And I couldn't have stated my personal opinion for rock-riding any better than Soot's description-especially for two-strokes, but even when I'm riding my four-stroke, I've found short-shifting and lugging the engine a bit to be a very effective method. Along with that of carrying the speed/momentum through those types of sections (when I'm able!). 👍

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+2 on the steering dampener.

Funny story about rocks! I'm in an Enduro, on time, haulin' @ss, come around a corner at Mach 1 into a mine field of HUGE boulders. :worthy:

My life literally passed before my eyes. :busted:

I picked the cleanest line and simply hung on! I rode it all out and didn't crash. It was a buckin' bronco and very ugly. No bones were broken.

Then & there, I decided to get a dampener ASAP! 👍

Get one, they are worth their weight in gold.

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ever worry about f'n up your rim? My front rim has got a couple of flat spots from hitting square edge hits too hard. Is it just a part of riding? Do I need to tune my front fork?

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