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Heat wrapping the header???

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Hey hey every one!!

Quick question for anyone who has Heat Wrapped their header pipe. I was just wondering how it held up to abuse/washing?? I haven't had any experience with the stuff before. The main problem is I just bought a M4 Exhaust for my 07 CRF 450 and the header pipe is doing a little bit of damage to my boots. It looks like my right boot (F3's) is touching the header and melting. Hopefully Heat Wrapping should fix this. Just wondering how it goes in the long term, as I don't want Ratty looging stuff hanging off my bike the first time I wash it.

THANKS FOR THE HELP PEOPLES!!!!!!👍:worthy:

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Hey hey every one!!

Quick question for anyone who has Heat Wrapped their header pipe. I was just wondering how it held up to abuse/washing?? I haven't had any experience with the stuff before. The main problem is I just bought a M4 Exhaust for my 07 CRF 450 and the header pipe is doing a little bit of damage to my boots. It looks like my right boot (F3's) is touching the header and melting. Hopefully Heat Wrapping should fix this. Just wondering how it goes in the long term, as I don't want Ratty looging stuff hanging off my bike the first time I wash it.

THANKS FOR THE HELP PEOPLES!!!!!!👍:worthy:

Mine lasted about 5 washes with the pressure washer, then it got toasted. I would recommend just getting a heat shield. Also, if your header pipe is titanium the heat wrap is just fine for it. Some people say that heat wrapping titanium will make it crack, but its 100% a myth.

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Heat wrap has other benefits as well, most of them resulting in a little more power.

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I've wrapped the headers on my last 2 bikes, mainly because I was burning pants and boots. I've found that it holds up just fine unless you lay it in the rocks and tear it. I avoid hitting it with the power washer also as it takes the silicone coating off that I spray on, it doesn't neccessarily hurt the wrap itself though.

Some tricks to putting it on:

Soak it in water and put it on wet. Stretch it as tight as you can and overlap 50%.

Bake it in the oven at 250 until dry(if your not married). I did it when my wife was gone. 👍 This will shrink it up nice and tight.

Get the silicone spray for header wrap and spray it well. This will keep water from soaking in. It will smoke for a little while when you first run it until it's cured.

It's not going to last forever, but you get 50 ft. per roll and you can do many pipes with one roll.

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Alot of heat shields come with those hose clamps on the back, Moose makes a carbon fiber one, with those clamps theres no need for heat shield mountson the header itself.

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I've wrapped the headers on my last 2 bikes, mainly because I was burning pants and boots. I've found that it holds up just fine unless you lay it in the rocks and tear it. I avoid hitting it with the power washer also as it takes the silicone coating off that I spray on, it doesn't neccessarily hurt the wrap itself though.

Some tricks to putting it on:

Soak it in water and put it on wet. Stretch it as tight as you can and overlap 50%.

Bake it in the oven at 250 until dry(if your not married). I did it when my wife was gone. 👍 This will shrink it up nice and tight.

Get the silicone spray for header wrap and spray it well. This will keep water from soaking in. It will smoke for a little while when you first run it until it's cured.

It's not going to last forever, but you get 50 ft. per roll and you can do many pipes with one roll.

Thanks everyone for the replies. Is there a specific Silicone spray you used for the heat wrapping????

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Thanks everyone for the replies. Is there a specific Silicone spray you used for the heat wrapping????

No, don't spray anything on. Just use hose clamps to keep it on there.

P.S: When you first start the bike it will smoke like a mother, so don't be alarmed, it will probably do this for a good 5 minutes. All the smoke is, is the oil in the heat wrap is being burned off.

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Thanks everyone for the replies. Is there a specific Silicone spray you used for the heat wrapping????

Yes there is and it does help. Most auto parts stores carry it in either silver or black.

siliconespray1.jpg

Cut and pasted from DEI:

DEI High-Temp Silicone Coating™ FAQ

What is the purpose of using HT Silicone Coating™?

HT Silicone Coating has several beneficial purposes on header wraps and metal surfaces. When applied to an exhaust wrap it increases the wraps thermal isolation and resistance. The silicone agent bonds to the surface of the wrap and increases its integrity which reduces the need to re-wrap headers or piping, just re-apply HT Silicone Coating™ routinely. HT Silicone can also be applied to a prepped metal surface where wrapping is improbable. Because HT Silicone Coating™ is silicone based it also can repell water, dirt and oils from any surface. This is especially usefull on header wrap as keeping it free of debris lessens wear and increases it's durability.

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Heat wrap has other benefits as well, most of them resulting in a little more power.

more power? how does it do that?

what are the other benefits?

i can see running wrap on wide open exhaust but not on a corked up system.

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more power? how does it do that?

what are the other benefits?

i can see running wrap on wide open exhaust but not on a corked up system.

I'm pretty sure the power gain thing is a myth, I doubt it does what it says...

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I'm pretty sure the power gain thing is a myth, I doubt it does what it says...

it is a myth i know cause we used it for drag racing,

and actually wrapping a corked up system like a dirt bike can cause high piston temps. and cause damage.

i would not wrap i pipe on a dirt bike unless it was maybe a 1300cc hill climber that was running wide open.

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it is a myth i know cause we used it for drag racing,

and actually wrapping a corked up system like a dirt bike can cause high piston temps. and cause damage.

i would not wrap i pipe on a dirt bike unless it was maybe a 1300cc hill climber that was running wide open.

I highly doubt it's going to hurt it, but I just did it on my pipe so I didn't burn myself.

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and actually wrapping a corked up system like a dirt bike can cause high piston temps. and cause damage.

i would not wrap i pipe on a dirt bike unless it was maybe a 1300cc hill climber that was running wide open.

That's another myth. The temperature of the actual exhaust stream is changed very little by heat wrap either way. What is changed is the amount of heat radiated off the exhaust into the immediately adjacent area. In a car with a closed engine compartment, insulating the exhaust can lower under hood temps, which in turn can lower intake air and manifold temps, and lead to power increases. On a motorcycle with the engine out in the open, it makes no difference.

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That's another myth. The temperature of the actual exhaust stream is changed very little by heat wrap either way. What is changed is the amount of heat radiated off the exhaust into the immediately adjacent area. In a car with a closed engine compartment, insulating the exhaust can lower under hood temps, which in turn can lower intake air and manifold temps, and lead to power increases. On a motorcycle with the engine out in the open, it makes no difference.

Thats makes sense on the power gains, but I don't think most motorcycle people do it for power as they do it for not burning their pants. Well at least I did...

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I wrapped my header in hopes of protecting my ankle and possibly reducing some heat being transfered to the ol' air cooled engine.

I am concerned that header wrap is going to ruing my header pipe. The wrap actually appears to make the header glowing red hot under the wrap.

I am afraid this excessive heat is eventually going to cause damage.

I once wrapped the headers on my jeep...boy it made more power due to less heat being transfered to the intake manifold. Eventually the welds gave up and I had to purchase a new one.

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That's another myth. The temperature of the actual exhaust stream is changed very little by heat wrap either way. What is changed is the amount of heat radiated off the exhaust into the immediately adjacent area. In a car with a closed engine compartment, insulating the exhaust can lower under hood temps, which in turn can lower intake air and manifold temps, and lead to power increases. On a motorcycle with the engine out in the open, it makes no difference.

+1 under the hood is a differnet story,

running wrap on a corked up system wont cause higher piston or head temps?

i know the engine is wide open, i have seen temps of 700-800 degrees on some bikes right at the cylinder and header, what temp does aluminum melt at 1200? i would think this will cause premature fatigue on the cylinder and piston when having a more insulated exhaust that does not help displace the heat away, heat travels to whatever is colder so wouldnt heat from the exhaust transfer to the cylinder and cause higher temps maybe not much but im guessing 10-20 deg? also radiant heat transfer thru metal, if your header glows red that heat is being transfered right to the cylinder if the cylinder is running colder am i thinking of this right?

we wrapped a gsx750 exhaust in wrap and had a piston melt down,

we were told by a old time vet to start the wrap at least 6" in from the header and after we did that it ran cooler and zero problems, i also noticed after he told us that that the salt flat guys do the same thing they only start to wrap the header about 6" down from the head.

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Heat transfer

There are three basic ways in which heat is transferred. In fluids, heat is often transferred by convection, in which the motion of the fluid itself carries heat from one place to another. Another way to transfer heat is by conduction, which does not involve any motion of a substance, but rather is a transfer of energy within a substance (or between substances in contact). The third way to transfer energy is by radiation, which involves absorbing or giving off electromagnetic waves.

Convection

Heat transfer in fluids generally takes place via convection. Convection currents are set up in the fluid because the hotter part of the fluid is not as dense as the cooler part, so there is an upward buoyant force on the hotter fluid, making it rise while the cooler, denser, fluid sinks. Birds and gliders make use of upward convection currents to rise, and we also rely on convection to remove ground-level pollution.

Forced convection, where the fluid does not flow of its own accord but is pushed, is often used for heating (e.g., forced-air furnaces) or cooling (e.g., fans, automobile cooling systems).

Conduction

When heat is transferred via conduction, the substance itself does not flow; rather, heat is transferred internally, by vibrations of atoms and molecules. Electrons can also carry heat, which is the reason metals are generally very good conductors of heat. Metals have many free electrons, which move around randomly; these can transfer heat from one part of the metal to another.

Radiation

The third way to transfer heat, in addition to convection and conduction, is by radiation, in which energy is transferred in the form of electromagnetic waves. an electromagnetic wave is basically an oscillating electric and magnetic field traveling through space at the speed of light. Don't worry if that definition goes over your head, because you're already familiar with many kinds of electromagnetic waves, such as radio waves, microwaves, the light we see, X-rays, and ultraviolet rays. The only difference between the different kinds is the frequency and wavelength of the wave.

Note that the radiation we're talking about here, in regard to heat transfer, is not the same thing as the dangerous radiation associated with nuclear bombs, etc. That radiation comes in the form of very high energy electromagnetic waves, as well as nuclear particles. The radiation associated with heat transfer is entirely electromagnetic waves, with a relatively low (and therefore relatively safe) energy.

Everything around us takes in energy from radiation, and gives it off in the form of radiation. When everything is at the same temperature, the amount of energy received is equal to the amount given off. Because there is no net change in energy, no temperature changes occur. When things are at different temperatures, however, the hotter objects give off more energy in the form of radiation than they take in; the reverse is true for the colder objects.

Heat transfer in general

We've looked at the three types of heat transfer. Conduction and convection rely on temperature differences; radiation does, too, but with radiation the absolute temperature is important. In some cases one method of heat transfer may dominate over the other two, but often heat transfer occurs via two, or even all three, processes simultaneously.

A stove and oven are perfect examples of the different kinds of heat transfer. If you boil water in a pot on the stove, heat is conducted from the hot burner through the base of the pot to the water. Heat can also be conducted along the handle of the pot, which is why you need to be careful picking the pot up, and why most pots don't have metal handles. In the water in the pot, convection currents are set up, helping to heat the water uniformly. If you cook something in the oven, on the other hand, heat is transferred from the glowing elements in the oven to the food via radiation.

this is all actual physics

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I defintely did not wrap near the head, more like the short area where the ankle is.

Im not worried about ruining the head, just the header pipe. Parts are not cheap or readily available for a Suzuki DR200.

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