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Busted right-side crank case.

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I knocked a hole on the bottom of the right side crank case on my 06' DR650. The hole is just behind the drain plug and about the size of a tennis ball :worthy: . Did it in Colorado on the TAT, so it was worth it I guess for the chance of a lifetime ride I had 👍 .

So, I am just looking for suggestions on what to do.I found a right side case on ebay but the listing is says 96-00. I thought the bike is the same from 96-present?

Also, does anyone have any experience welding a hole like this with success?

Thanks,

Billy

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The crankcase halves are machined as a set. If you try to mate a case half from one motor to the other half from another motor it is likely you will have problems. The crankshaft and transmission bearing bores may not be aligned. The base gasket surface may not match up, etc.

A broken case can be welded but it will need to be completely disassembled and cleaned of every trace of oil to have a chance of getting a good weld with no porosity.

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think it might be cheaper to buy a 96 model bike, transplant the engine and then sell the rest of the bits. Thats my intention if mine ever grenades

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The engine/cases from any 96 and up bike will fit. Finding a matching pair in good condition is not going to be easy. The last two complete DR engines on Ebay sold for $1000-$1300 or so.

Not to be a smart-ass, but did you really ride the TAT without a skid plate on the bike? If you did have one, did it break through the plate (what brand was it so we can all avoid it 👍 )?

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Yea, it was abone headed move not to have a skid plate. I had seen on other web sites, guys asking if they could do the TAT on a GS or other large bikes and some were saying yea go for it , so I was like why the hell do I need a skid plate lol , shit happens 👍 .

Since I may just end up buying another engine , I am thinking about JB welding a piece of alum over the hole installing a skid plate and going with that till whatever happens happens.

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Might think about buying another bike (cheap but running...), swapping over your farkles that you have on this one (or swapping engines as previously mentioned), and parting out the extra stuff. Take the best of both bikes and combine them, then sell the bits. Might not ending up costing anything but your time!

On ronayers.com, they show a crankcase set that fits 06-07 models as 11300-32881, while the set that fits 01-05 is 11300-32880. 01-05 actually shows four part numbers, but none match the 06-07. I have no idea what the difference would be, but for some reason they're not the same part NUMBER. Might be the same in every respect. BTW, the stock 06 case set is $579.02 from ronayers.com. Less than I expected, anyway.

Also, if it were me, I'd grab that one on ebay and bust the engine apart and see if it'll work. Worst case is you'd spend another $100, and if it works, you just might get by fine. Better than $600 and the same amount of work.

You really could "what-if" this situation to death. I'd try the cheapest first and take the chance.

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I knocked a 1 1/2" hole in the crankcase on Yamaha YZ250 2-stroke many years back.

Couldn't afford a new crankcase or new race bike, so I PATCHED IT:eek:

I cut a patch from the top of an oil can (cheap metal of unknown variety) and glued it in place with a new tube of epoxy. Then after dried & cured for several days, I soaked some fiberglass in the same epoxy & added a double layer over my custom patchwork:crazy:

Amazing after drying & curing again, it held.....I even banged on it with a hammer trying to knock it loose or dent it.....NOTHING AT ALL:thumbsup:

Rode & raced that same bike for 3 full seasons and it held up great!!

So, go for the patch AND A SKIDPLATE.

HappyRiding !!

👍:worthy:

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If you do get another engine, Let me know if your interested in parting with your old one, or wrecking it out, Im interested in buying a few bits and pieces, ie. cam, fly wheel, crank shaft, I have a few idea's I want to experiment with and need these parts to do it.

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Did you keep the pieces that go knocked out??? If you did you can make a good JB repair job, stronger than the original area. Youu will have to dismantle the engine. I got to go now (wifey giving me the look) I'll say more tonight.

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I have the pieces but they are in 3 diff pieces and looks like it would be impossible to use them though. The hole is about a inch behind the drain bolt.

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JB Weld is some amazing stuff -- belongs right alongside 100mph racing duct tape in any tool box.

Clean area and piece the chunks together as close as possible and cut up a beer can to use as way to hold the parts in place during the cure process.

As long as the busted out area is not stressed and you just need to keep oily stuff in and dirty stuff out glob on the JB Weld and give it plenty of time to cure.

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That should be just fine, have done this numerous times on anything from Chinese C50 copies to lawnmower engines to Peugeot diesel van lumps & never had a failure. Main thing is to remove every trace of contamination before applying or it'll just stick to the crap & drop off when the crap does.

(also repaired an ice-damaged Cagiva watercooled Barrel with Hylomar & bodyfiller once and that held out too!)

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A word on the JB weld, that and duct tape is what got the DR off the mountain after the bust. Covered the hole with gorillia duct tape and then covered that with JB weld, filled with oil and prayed all the way down 👍

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OK, I'm back. First, before doing a halfassed attempt with case in place (field repair only!) consider doing the job right. Think what will happen if a shoddy repair gives up while you are tooling down the road at 70mph - no engine oil because it's all over your rear tire! Look for more complete directions on the web. A large hole is best repaired with the case off and really clean. I used the procedure below to fix a smashed clutch case on a XR200. I could put my hand through the hole and there were about 12 small pieces. After the repair that same area got wacked hard in another rocky crash, survived! It's had many hours of operation since and it's held up oil leak free. Like I say there are more complete versions of this procedure (with pics) online.

1. you have the pieces, good.

2. Clean everything with solvent then brake cleaner.

3, mock up the pieces in the hole using tape strips on one side to hold in the proper places.

4. Coat the other side with metal filled epoxy - any repair kit brand, you probably should just buy a half pound or one pound kit. Work the epoxy into the gaps and put extra on as it's going to flow and wet the surfaces. Don't worry too much about how smooth it is. Work quickly to get to the next step before the epoxy starts setting (< 5 mins)

5. Put the case into a oven preheated to 250 degrees (10-15 minutes - check that it's set). The heat will reduce the viscosity of the epoxy then rapidly cure it. The result is it flows and fills all the little pores and cracks around the pieces. It will look wet smooth too, amazing!

6. After it cools carefully peel the tape off. Clean any tape residue off with brake cleaner. Coat that side with epoxy and throw it in the oven.

7. Should be finished! The epoxy takes at least 24 hours to fully cure. It's probably best to try to do the whole job in one go as the epoxy will chemically bond to partially cured epoxy better than fully cured epoxy.

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Nice write up & probably the most thorough way to do the job. Liking the oven idea too, will give that a shot next time I have to do something similar. (not too soon, God willing!!! 👍 )

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