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I changed oil on my bike a week ago (~1000miles total run) ,and used full syntetic oil 10-40 (specs JASO MA2, JASO T903:2006 4T, API: SM).

After engine has varmed up ,I feel that it is much more noise from the engine than before. Also when shifting gears,the sound is much more metallic.

Feels like this oil is thinner than the oem oil on the bike when i bought it.

Should I use a semisyntetic oil or is the oil I'm using ok ?

And yes, it's the right volume of oil...

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I got the same feeling from full synthetic so I switched back to dyno oil.

If your changing your oil every 1,000 miles or less you should be good no matter what you run.

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I changed mine on Sunday to Royal Purple, which is the

oil I always use. I don't notice any difference in noise

level. My tranny sure shifts a little smoother now though,

but that's something I notice in whatever I put RP in.

I think sometimes we are just a little more observant

when we make a change in something.

Regards Sonny

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You should be fine if you want to quiet it down go to a blended oil 20-50 and you will notice a difference.

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I don't think your supposed to run synthetic oil in the drz 400. Clutch slips?

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I don't think your supposed to run synthetic oil in the drz 400. Clutch slips?

Bike specific syn's are ok....

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I don't think your supposed to run synthetic oil in the drz 400. Clutch slips?

not true...there are many wifes tales about syn oil.

you can break in a bike on fully syn.

at the moment im running repsol fully syn 4T racing.... the best but pricey.

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The oil I used has a higher quality than Suzuki specifies, and I thought it was supposed to be better.

As long as the engine is cold ,it's no case ,but as it's warms up ,it gets noisier.

Haven't had any probs with clutch slipping ,only the sound thats make me wonder. Phoned a frien of mine,who runs a suzuki garage here ,and he told me they seldom use full syntetic oil, but couldn't give me a good answer to why not (They probably invoice full syntetic ,and delivers semi ??)

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Full synthetic is pricier, that is why a shop wouldn't use it.

According to wikipedia here are the advantages/disadvantages of Synthetic:

Advantages:

Measurably better low and high temperature viscosity performanceBetter chemical & shear stability

Decreased evaporative loss

Resistance to oxidation, thermal breakdown and oil sludge problems

Extended drain intervals with the environmental benefit of less oil waste

Improved fuel economy in certain engine configurations

Better lubrication on cold starts

Disadvantages:

Initial costs are usually four times greater than petroleum-based oils, though at one time, man-made oils cost ten times more than petroleum. Initial costs are often mitigated by extended change intervals, which individuals may confirm through used oil analysis (UOA).

The lower friction may make them unsuitable for break-in (i.e. the initial run-in period of the vehicle) where friction is desirable to cause wear. Improved engine part machining has made break-in less critical than it once was though. Many modern cars now come with synthetic oil as a factory fill.

Potential decomposition problems in certain chemical environments (industrial use dominantly)

Potential stress cracking of plastic components like POM (polyoxymethylene) in the presence of PAOs (polyalphaolefins).

Potential on some older pushrod race engines with roller lifters for the roller itself not to spin with camshaft movement, but rather slide while the roller itself remains either stationary or at a lower circumferential speed than that of the camshaft lobe[citation needed]

In July 1996, Consumer Reports published the results of a two year motor oil test involving a fleet of 75 New York taxi cabs and found no noticeable advantage of synthetic oil over regular oil[2]. In their article, they noted that "Big-city cabs don't see many cold start-ups or long periods of high speed driving in extreme heat. But our test results relate to the most common type of severe service - stop-and-go city driving." According to their study, synthetic oil is "worth considering for extreme driving conditions: high ambient temperatures and high engine load, or very cold temperatures." [3] This research was criticized by some because most engine damage appears to be caused by cold starts, and their research method may not have included enough cold starts to be representative of personal vehicle use.

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The noise has increased because the oil is thinner than the oil that came with the bike.

Everything I have read says that with the short oil change intervals of motorcycles there is really no advantage to a synthetic oil. That being said I use a synthetic to get the viscocity specified by my bike, the owners manual say 10W60 ($12/liter at the BMW dealership) but the sticker under the seat says 5W40 ($16/Gallon at Walmart). I am probably the worst motorcycle abuser ever but I decided cheaper oil is better. Now I don't think twice when I change my oil before the specified interval because it is cheap. As with any oil thread I'm sure this will change into a 10 page thread, everybody has an opinion, nobody knows for sure. If there was an exactly right and wrong then there would not be as many opinions. If you don't like the noise, go to a natural oil but it will probably also be noisier than the original oil because it is lighter. During break in you want a certain amunt of friction so a heavier oil is used, usually natural.

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So the base is that the syntetic doesn't harm my engine ,I'm just throwing cash out the window ?

I'll usually change oil at my bikes at 1000-1500 miles,and plan to continue to do this. So then I'll go for the Mineral oil to half the price :ACEA A3/B3 API SJ/CF.

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So the base is that the syntetic doesn't harm my engine ,I'm just throwing cash out the window ?

Just remember... you are simply reading opinions... not many people around here are experts on the subject.

I personally think its foolish to not run a synthetic, but thats just one more opinion from a non-expert. Search, read, look at what the people you trust around here have to say about oil... then you are least making a more informed decision (guess) as to what is best for your bike and your wallet.

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If the synthetic your using has friction inhibitors in it you shouldn't be using it.

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You dont have to use a motorcycle specific oil in a motorcycle but you CANNOT use an oil that contains friction modifiers or the clutch may not grip and no matter how much you rev the engine the motorcycle may not go anywhere until you replace the oil with a non-friction modified oil and replace the clutch plates. Most car oils do contain friction modifiers because they dont have the clutch running in the oil. The oil in a car engine only has to lubricate the crankshaft, cylinders and cylinder head but in a motorcycle engine it also lubricates the gearbox and clutch as well.

The easiest way to be sure your oil is safe to use in a motorcycle is to use a motorcycle specific oil. If you dont and you have a problem with the clutch or any sort of lubrication problem you will have no warranty to claim on and the few dollars you saved on oil will be a mere pitance compared to the repair costs.

Oil in a motorcycle engine will degrade faster than oil in a car engine because the gears in the gearbox of the motorcycle engine shear the molecules of the oil and the engine produces much more horsepower for an equivalent amount of engine capacity therefor giving the oil a much harder job to do. Do yourself and your motorcycle a favour and always use the right oil for the job, a motorcycle specific oil.

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you CANNOT use an oil that contains friction modifiers

Its pretty easy to tell which oils have them... just look at the API label and see if it says "energy conserving"... most oils higher than 10w30 will not have them.

apiec.gif

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As a diesel mechanic I have access to Shell Rimula CI4, which is what I put in on my first oil change. Bike did fine. Then I started reading about oils here on TT, and got it in my head that Mobil One 4T racing oil was the way to go. So $9.50 a quart later, my engine is noisier and I am noticing alot more heat @ my clutch cover???? Clutch hasnt slipped at all, but next oil change I am going back to my free oil.

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