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Do you pack this with grease ?

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I'm disassembling my brand new 08 YZ450F to grease the swingarm, linkage and steering head bearings this morning. Boy, it sure is nice and easy doing this job when a bike is brand spanking new. It's spotless clean and all the bolts and parts are in perfect order :thumbsup:

I've noticed this before, but never stopped to ask the question. The swing arm bolt passes through the back of the engine case. When you look through the back of the engine case, you notice there is a recess around the circumfrence of where the swing arm bolt passes through. Should I be packing that recess with grease or leave it dry? Until now I've just been greasing the bolt, but not packing the engine case. I've never had any trouble with the swing arm bolt seizing in the case, but am wondering if this is something I should be doing.

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You shouldnt have to grease the part of the case where the bolt goes through,because as long as you grease the hole bolt when you put the bolt through it will put the grease on the inside of that collar. All the more packing it would do is waste grease, because as soon as you shove the bolt through it would just push all of the grease out of the collar and to onto your floor.And the bolt takes up very close to all of the space in that collar, so like i said all you have to do is grease the whole bolt entirely.

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I have also never really thought about it but when ever I have pulled the pivot bolt out of older bikes it always seems there is a dry spot/light rust on the bolt where it went through the engine cases. It wouldn't hurt a bit to put a light film inside for reassurance but I wouldn't 'pack' it with grease. And if you think about it, when you push a bolt through any hole what happens to the grease? It gets squeegeed off instantly. Yes there will be a slight film but I like there to be more... So I put grease on every surface (and now I will for sure be putting it in the case hole), and wipe up the excess.

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I always grease all bolts.

I dont grease all bolts, doesnt putting grease on them mess up the torque amount needed to tighten them?

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I dont grease all bolts, doesnt putting grease on them mess up the torque amount needed to tighten them?

Exactly the opposite - I always grease all my bolts with the exception of those few that use locktite

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The grease does change the torque values. Its easy to break fasteners once you grease them and try to reach the specified torque. I would rather torque to 75% of the value, grease the fasteners, and be able to remove them again.

Notice how corroded axles and swingarm pivots can get in a short time.

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i would put anti seize on the swingarm bolt where it goes into the case instead of grease because over time grease will dry and it will be even harder to get the bolt out.

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Notice how corroded axles and swingarm pivots can get in a short time.

You're not kidding, my YZ is only a couple of months old and all the rear supension joints were drying out big time. This thread motivated me to tear it down and lube it. It was an hour well spent.

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Lately I have been using rusky's idea of the anti-sieze. It does appear to stay around for a long time on these seldom serviced joints.

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You're not kidding, my YZ is only a couple of months old and all the rear supension joints were drying out big time. This thread motivated me to tear it down and lube it. It was an hour well spent.

Great your bike apprcicates this along with a better ride too!!!

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Now that I had my bike torn down from brand new, I feel the need to dispel some of the rumors about how well the factory greases the bearings. At first glance the bearings looked like there was little to no grease on them. But after closer inspection it appears the factory uses a type of moly paste. The stuff the factory uses is extremely thin compared to the Bel-Ray waterproof grease that I typically use. It's so thin that I just looks sparse to non-existent. Although the factory grease is thin, all of the bearings were coated in it and it's extremely slick. I don't know if the factory grease will last as long as other types, but it certainly seemed to have a lower coefficient of friction than other grease types.

I like to preach this to everyone and anyone who listens, but there are several other areas of a bike that in my opinion must be coated with anti-seize.

1. Chain Adjuster bolts are notorious for seizing inside the swing-arm :worthy: . I always coat the chain adjuster bolts with anti-seize as soon as I bring the bike home.

2. Any bolt that threads into those brass inserts inside the gas tank or air box. When a bolt seizes inside those inserts (and they DO!!), you're in for a lot of grief :thumbsup:. Typically when you try to back the bolt out, the insert just spins inside the gas tank or air box. I've heard other people say they've had success in getting the bolts out, but I've never been able to do it without trashing the insert, or gas tank/air box.

3. Threads on the brake pad pins. I've had those corrode fast inside the caliper mount. I'm not sure what the brake pins are made of, but the material doesn't like the material in the caliper mount.

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I place the grease after the threads, then slide it in.

If I do get grease on a thread a quick easy shot of brake cleaner

and a rag takes care of it. I grease the axles well too, as well as the bearings and inner hubs. I also then place masking tape over the threads and flag the end. Grease always covers the tape when the axel is placed. Then a light pull revels clean threads.

I cannot imagine that any body would even think of greasing threads.

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Now that I had my bike torn down from brand new, I feel the need to dispel some of the rumors about how well the factory greases the bearings. At first glance the bearings looked like there was little to no grease on them. But after closer inspection it appears the factory uses a type of moly paste. The stuff the factory uses is extremely thin compared to the Bel-Ray waterproof grease that I typically use. It's so thin that I just looks sparse to non-existent. Although the factory grease is thin, all of the bearings were coated in it and it's extremely slick. I don't know if the factory grease will last as long as other types, but it certainly seemed to have a lower coefficient of friction than other grease types.

I like to preach this to everyone and anyone who listens, but there are several other areas of a bike that in my opinion must be coated with anti-seize.

1. Chain Adjuster bolts are notorious for seizing inside the swing-arm :worthy: . I always coat the chain adjuster bolts with anti-seize as soon as I bring the bike home.

2. Any bolt that threads into those brass inserts inside the gas tank or air box. When a bolt seizes inside those inserts (and they DO!!), you're in for a lot of grief :thumbsup:. Typically when you try to back the bolt out, the insert just spins inside the gas tank or air box. I've heard other people say they've had success in getting the bolts out, but I've never been able to do it without trashing the insert, or gas tank/air box.

3. Threads on the brake pad pins. I've had those corrode fast inside the caliper mount. I'm not sure what the brake pins are made of, but the material doesn't like the material in the caliper mount.

You are right on the money with this one.....great post. Imagine the trouble this could save a person.....

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