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Replating

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I have been planning on rebuilding my xr 600, I know it's nikasil plated so I was wondering if I have it bored or honed out at all (I was thinking having .020 taken off) Will I have to get it replated?

How much is replating usually too?

Any help would be appreciated, I am going to start teardown this week so let me know please.👍

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You can bore and replate or you can bore, insert a sleeve, and bore/hone the sleeve. The cost will be about the same either way. The plus of the sleeve is it can be bored again. The minus is less heat transfer.

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well what kind of cost am I looking at

And also if I go out to 101mm(stock is 97) will the cylinder wall still be thick enough to fit in a sleeve?

Final question, do you think the machinist would be able to make me a sleeve or would I have to order on(where from)?

Thanks again.

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It's the kind of thing that I would only trust to a shop that has done this type of work many times before. I'd use XR's Only due to the fact that I'm relatively close to them and I know that they can do it right. They want $75 for a sleeve. They have a sleeve setup for a 100mm bore which gives 628cc.

By the time you add in a new piston and the required machine work it will be a lot more. The sleeve might be the least expensive part. Not sure about replating but I think that the prices for that start at about $250 and can go as high as $400 depending on who does it. You still need to get a piston as well.

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The nikasil usually dosnt wear at all........

Unless the piston explodes theres no problem.

The nikasil is alot harder than the rings, so the rings wear down (out) first

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The nikasil usually dosnt wear at all........

Unless the piston explodes theres no problem.

The nikasil is alot harder than the rings, so the rings wear down (out) first

That's a good point. Save your self some $$$ if the cylinder is in good shape.

Is it possible to run an aftermarket high comp piston without a bore job? Are they made with good enough tolerances to just be dropped in?

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Your jumping the gun on all of this. Ive done so many top ends on 2 and 4 stroke bikes I cant possibly remember them all.

Its good to know what your options and budget is. What you need to do first is tear that engine down and inspect the cylinder. Look for scoring of the cylinder, deep grooves looking like vertical scratches. The cylinder needs to be checked for roundness and measured. This is best done by a machine shop that has expereince with coated cylinders. If all is well then all you do is install new rings, piston if necessary and when in doubt and since its apart I would do the piston regardless.

Do not...I repeat...do no try to hone, run a ball hone, emory paper the cylinder! Coated cylinders are not to be touched...they are either good or bad and dont need "Cleaning up" if they are good.

If the cylinder is bad I wouldnt hesitate to just go up to a big bore kit. So many companies like LA sleeve, Poweroll etc etc. You can probably get that 600 somehwere in the 625-650 range for about $500. and you just assemble. While its apart consider having a vavle job done if not just replace with fresh valve train parts that are questionable. Do it one, do it right if your keeping the bike. All JMO of course.

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well I was planning at first to go up to 640(monetary, and reliability issues are making me concerned)

I guess I will tear it apart and check the cyl, I am going to do the rod, cam, valves, and I am planning on throwing in a high comp piston.

Thanks for the info, I'lllet you know how it goes.

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