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standing up coming into corner


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My dad has been telling me I am not coming into the corner hard enough, he tells me to stand up and break with both brakes coming in,I feel so uncomfortable and feel like Im going to go over the bars. any tips on how to correctly do this.thanks

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Stand up, more like just get your butt off the seat a bit so you don't get kicked over the bars, get your weight to the back of the bike, grip the bike with your knee's/legs. Set up a few markers to make an oval, and parctice coming in on the brakes. At the apex or middle of the turn you can sit back down with your weight to the front of the bike. We had a trainer do this with my son and it helped alot.

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I dont use my rear break much, my son uses his rear break all the time, I am on a 4 stroke and find coming into the corner hot, my engine slows me down enough so I can use very little break. You will never be able to turn quickly and properly till you learn to stand until the apex of the turn, then sit down. Cornering will flow so much easier once you get into the habbit of standing up. I used to sit a lot and I found it wore me out quicker to sit. I started doing laps standing the entire time, I was slower at first (go slow to go fast) but now I am faster and cornering has come much eaiser. YOu must do this grasshopper. On a side note, get into the habbit of riding on the arches of your feet, I still ride on the balls of my feet and everytime I case a jump it feels like I snapped my ankle. And FYI, I am not a girl, I just call my GF dirty jenny, cause she is a dirty ho, and I like it

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I dont use my rear break much, my son uses his rear break all the time, I am on a 4 stroke and find coming into the corner hot, my engine slows me down enough so I can use very little break. You will never be able to turn quickly and properly till you learn to stand until the apex of the turn, then sit down. Cornering will flow so much easier once you get into the habbit of standing up. I used to sit a lot and I found it wore me out quicker to sit. I started doing laps standing the entire time, I was slower at first (go slow to go fast) but now I am faster and cornering has come much eaiser. YOu must do this grasshopper. On a side note, get into the habbit of riding on the arches of your feet, I still ride on the balls of my feet and everytime I case a jump it feels like I snapped my ankle. And FYI, I am not a girl, I just call my GF dirty jenny, cause she is a dirty ho, and I like it

867-5309???

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867-5309???

Now that is dating yourself. Me too, for recognizing it...👍 I had a laugh, tho.

Edit - To the TS, watch the pros and they stand and brake way deep into the corners and then drop to the seat, turn in and hit the gas all in one motion. If you can get that down, you will be faster guaranteed.

Mark

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Practicing standing all the time is a great thing to work on.

Practicing your turns using the oval technique is also very good.

But, in order for you to really get a feel for both breaking and standing it is best if you work on it separately at first. Work on just going in a straight line with a marker as your guide to start breaking. Get your weight back and this will help keep all the weight off your arms and keep you from feeling like your going to nose dive and go over the bars. Also it helps to grip the bike with your knees while your breaking. Then once you get a feel for that start working on using those techniques in an oval. Work on sitting at the last second. Working on standing will also help you get more comfortable shifting while your standing and will greatly improve your balance. I disagree with the riding on your arches though. It is best to ride on the balls of your feet. Riding on your arches could lead to accidentally hitting the break or shifter. This doesn't mean ride on the balls of your feet the entire time. Get comfortable moving around on your footpegs going from your balls to your arches. You will need to land off big jumps with your arches on the footpegs.

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Braking with both brakes is better, even on a 4 stroke. Why wouldn't you use both brakes??? The more stopping power you have, the longer you can hold it on into a corner, and thus enter faster. Use both brakes, but learn to use the rear brake only as hard as you can without locking up the rear wheel. Brake with the clutch out. As someone stated above, practice this in a straight line first and then try it cornering. Also, use the stopping inertia of the bike to sit yourself down at the front of the bike, and conversely use the acceleration to move you back as you exit to gain rear wheel traction. A pro rider once described the perfect corner as a small stoppie in, and a small power wheelie out. Picture that in your mind, then try it. Get your weight back on approach and during braking, then as you enter the apex of the corner, release your knee grip and allow yourself to slide forward and sit down all in one motion, thus sitting almost on the gas cap. It should be noted that not all corners require you to be all the way up front. As you ride more you will learn when and how to sit. It takes seat time, but practice the right techniques. Use both brakes, though. These bikes have both brakes for a reason.

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whats the deal with not locking up the back brake? I dont usually lock it up, but I see a lot of guys use it slide around corners. Or they come in hot sliding out of control with the rear. Some say they never use their front, others never use their rear, some say use them all, it gets so very confusing!

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You should definitely use both brakes. Also braking with out using the clutch will drastically improve your braking power, by using the engines decompression to help slow you down. This also works on a 2t, and is even is more effective if you down shift before you get in the brakes. By not locking up the rear brake you actually slow down faster, allow the motor to help with the braking, and have less of a chance of stalling. Now if you want to square up a corner then yes you will need to lock up the rear wheel. By locking up the wheel it brakes traction allowing you to slide the back end around.

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I dont use my rear break much, my son uses his rear break all the time, I am on a 4 stroke and find coming into the corner hot, my engine slows me down enough so I can use very little break. You will never be able to turn quickly and properly till you learn to stand until the apex of the turn, then sit down. Cornering will flow so much easier once you get into the habbit of standing up. I used to sit a lot and I found it wore me out quicker to sit. I started doing laps standing the entire time, I was slower at first (go slow to go fast) but now I am faster and cornering has come much eaiser. YOu must do this grasshopper. On a side note, get into the habbit of riding on the arches of your feet, I still ride on the balls of my feet and everytime I case a jump it feels like I snapped my ankle. And FYI, I am not a girl, I just call my GF dirty jenny, cause she is a dirty ho, and I like it

Don't take this guy's advice, and here's why.

"I am on a 4 stroke and find coming into the corner hot, my engine slows me down enough so I can use very little break"

If you don't have to use the brake very much, it means you should be on the gas longer. You're coasting into the corner... that's wasting time. You should either be on the gas hard or on the brakes hard... never coasting.

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Also braking with out using the clutch will drastically improve your braking power,

Braking wheel traction affects braking. If you can slow down just shy of locking the wheel that is as fast as you can slow down. The brakes have the ability to lock both wheels very easily. The engine compresion does not add to breaking power. Learning brake feel is the key.

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I used to ride w/o the use of the front brake, till I was taught by ryan huges the technique he had a race in my area and I was helping him in his pit.

anyways, his deal for squaring a turn.

go in hot apply both brakes while standing, lean the bike into the turn, while still standing, when you reach your apex, or area you want to square sit, weight outside peg release front brake and let the rear slide to the desired angle, clutch and go.

after alot of tries it gets real easy.

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Braking wheel traction affects braking. If you can slow down just shy of locking the wheel that is as fast as you can slow down. The brakes have the ability to lock both wheels very easily. The engine compresion does not add to breaking power. Learning brake feel is the key.

I completely agree with this post minus the part about engine compression not adding to your breaking. By not pulling in the clutch and downshifting you will be able to slow down in half the time. Just try it next time your at your track practicing. Try pulling in the clutch and braking, and then brake exactly the same without using the clutch. Guaranteed you will slow down faster. That is exactly what Gary Semics teaches in his schools.

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When you are entering the corner(standing up), you should be standing up with your knees above the pegs, squeezing the tank. Be sure to keep your elbows up also. Right around the time your front tire is even with the rut, kind of sit/slam down up on the tank to help compress the suspension. By then you should be about 1/4 way through with your suspension compressed and you should be rolling onto the power by now accelerating out. (Compressing the suspension lowers the COG and helps give you more drive/traction during acceleration.)

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