Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

D.O.T Tires for my '06 650L

Recommended Posts

I looked and looked through the results of a forum search, and couldn't

dig up the an answer to my question.:worthy:

I bought an '06 XR650L:ride: with 724 miles on it.👍 It drives great on the road, but on trails, I need help.:blah:

I need some tires that can handle this slippery clay, and soft shifting sand better than the stock on/off tires that came on it.

I'm looking for the hardest rubber, with the most aggressive nobbies that are DOT legal.

I live in central NC. I run a lot of errands with it, but also was to have some fun on the weekends. With these stock tires, I do too much tip-toeing around.:busted:

Any ideas? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want the best preformance off road get non-DOT knobbies. If you must get DOT tires, I think that Pirelli has the best tires going. Most of the fronts are DOT and they have what I think is the best rear in the Scorpion Pro. Another possibility is the Kenda Trackmaster, but the 650L can shred that tire deping on the conditions and the throttle position.

The Dunlop D606 and the Pirelli MT21 are good on and off road, but don't do so good in the mud or sand. You really need a soft terrain tire for the sand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too ! I tear up tires fast. XR600R And not just down the center line but all around "on the street" I was told the dunlop 606s are good.I also need to find a stronger tire but I do not want a street tire that looks like a road tire.What do you guys think?

Danny 👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you want the best preformance off road get non-DOT knobbies. If you must get DOT tires, I think that Pirelli has the best tires going. Most of the fronts are DOT and they have what I think is the best rear in the Scorpion Pro. Another possibility is the Kenda Trackmaster, but the 650L can shred that tire deping on the conditions and the throttle position.

The Dunlop D606 and the Pirelli MT21 are good on and off road, but don't do so good in the mud or sand. You really need a soft terrain tire for the sand.

Is the Scorpion Pro DOT?

I noticed that the Perelli M21 came in the right size for the front, but not the back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IRC makes a full line of enduro tires. Every application from suppa moto to mud machine. Ya can even keep yer 18 and 21 inch rims. I have a set of 70/30s on mine and they don't cost a fortune.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run the Scorpian pro in the front and it hooks up great on and off road. On the back I have the Dunlap 606. It hooks up well on both street and off road but I find it to be quite loud on the tarmac. Currently I have about a thousand mostly highway miles on both tires with about 60% of the tread left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm looking for the hardest rubber, with the most aggressive nobbies that are DOT legal.

I live in central NC. I run a lot of errands with it, but also was to have some fun on the weekends. With these stock tires, I do too much tip-toeing around.:worthy:

Any ideas? :busted:

I've gone through 2 sets of rear D606s and only got about 1K miles out each one - at the most. I tried a D606 on the front and I didn't care too much for it. On the rear, it worked fairly well on the NC trails, and was a little loud on the road - but that's alright for me.

Currently, I'm running some MEFO knobbies. The rear is wearing very fast - I'll be lucky to get 700 miles out of it. Very soft compound and sucks taking curves on the road. The front seems to be a little better but does not like any type of ruts or tracks. I won't buy them again.

I live in NC (near Hickory) and commute daily to work, and play every weekend at Brown Mtn. ORV park. The terrain changes weekly depending on rainfall. One day it can be dry, hard-packed dirt covered with sand on top of rocks - the next day it can be wet, sticky clay on top of slippery rocks. It's basically impossible to find one tire that will work well on everything.👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for the rear I would say the Kenda trak master II is the best D.O.T. I have used. The MT18 works good on the front. That said I am mounting A non D.O.T. Maxxis Maxxcross-IT on the rear & a Pirelli Scorpion on the front

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im running the Kenda trak master II's on the front and the back. So far I have no complaints at all with this set up. I run about 80% trail, 20% road with about 14/15lbs. air pressure and have about 400 miles on them so far. Handling off road is great, accelerate slowly on the pavement to save the rear from wearing quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've run 50/50 dual sport tires, MT-21's and D-606's. 👍

For my money, the D-606 is the best off road tire (that's DOT approved) of all :worthy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm looking for the hardest rubber, with the most aggressive nobbies that are DOT legal.

A tire like that will shred the knobbies off the second it comes in contact with granite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the same boat. I rode my first rails last weekend woth the stocker tires and was NOT impressed.

From what I've been reading on here for the last month or so is a Dunlop 606 in the rear and a Pirelli MT-21 up front is a good combo or the MT21 both rear and front. I use mine to commute 40 miles a day about 1-2 times a week.

Now my question, what size 606? 120-90-18 or 130-90-18? I don't want to have to trim this and that to make something work, but want a decent foot print. I'm not changing my gearing until I get more aggressive tires. No point in just spinning the crap out of the stock ones, although it would be fun on the street where they actually hook up.

Is there an advantage to HD tubes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now my question, what size 606? 120-90-18 or 130-90-18? I don't want to have to trim this and that to make something work, but want a decent foot print.

I ran the 130/90-18 on my L with no problems, although I don't have a chain guard on the swingarm. I don't know if it would rub against it or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 130 606 will fit with no issue. The 606 cost about twice what the trek master II but does last longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there an advantage to HD tubes?

Yes, less flats. I recomend them:thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the bottom line. No matter what it's a compromise. You just can't make a tire that is awesome on the dirt and great on the street.

I solved this dilemma by getting a street bike for the pavement. My plated XR600 gets non-DOT knobbies and I barely ever ride it on the street. I have a street bike that I use to go back and forth to work. It's a 1980 CM400 that I picked up for $200. It has much better street manners than my XR600 ever did and goes about as fast. It has street tires that grip the road pretty well and last about 5000 miles. Just the savings in DOT tires for my XR more than pay for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is the bottom line. No matter what it's a compromise. You just can't make a tire that is awesome on the dirt and great on the street.

I solved this dilemma by getting a street bike for the pavement. My plated XR600 gets non-DOT knobbies and I barely ever ride it on the street. I have a street bike that I use to go back and forth to work. It's a 1980 CM400 that I picked up for $200. It has much better street manners than my XR600 ever did and goes about as fast. It has street tires that grip the road pretty well and last about 5000 miles. Just the savings in DOT tires for my XR more than pay for it.

I'd really agree with this point. You're dealing with two completely different environments. Street (when dry) is hard and smooth, so you have to push towards a tire with lots of tread, small gaps, and a harder compound which will ware well on the hard suface if it's to last at all. Sand and mud require a tire with lots of space between the knobs, a: to clean out the mud (or you end up with a slick which is bad for mud riding) and b: will bite chucks of sand to give you forward motion in the soft loose soil. This type of tire is terrible for the street and a street tire is terrible for soft terrain. So your choice is to buy a tire that's great for the dirt and take it easy on the street, buy a street (read DS street) tire and enjoy riding on the street and hate riding on the dirt, OR buy the best compromise tire you can and NOT REALLY enjoy either the dirt of the street the way you want.

Than again... you can buy a really good dirt tire (take it easy when on the street) and enjoy your dirt riding AND get a street bike (of some sort) AND enjoy riding the streets TOO.

Those are your choices... choose well Grasshopper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess in a perfect world, extra stock rims would be in abundant supply, then you could have one set for dirt and one for street and one could just change out wheels for the appropriate environment.

Too bad they are so freaking expensive. I bought a whole street bike for half what a set of wheels goes for on ebay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...