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not getting any faster!

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hi ive been riding dirt bikes for about 3 years, but i just started riding motocross last july. i have been improving alot so far at most of the local tracks (riding 125b now =)) but my practice track i cant seem to get any quicker at! if someone could give me a few pointers, heres a vid from this april.

i moved up from the 02 in the vid to an 06 and i feel alot faster but im about the same lap times on this track...

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Your not doing too bad, one thing I notice, your back is straight up, you should try to arch your back a bit to get your head closer to over the bars, it will help your center of gravity and the bike will not want to stand up in turns.

bend your elbows out and push on the bars ( forward ) you will see this will help with any arm pump.

on your jumps, need to get off the seat and center yourself on the bike, your head again should be over the bars slightly.

Lastly, have you been adjusting your suspension ? It appears the rebound is way too tight, when you go thru the small whoops, the bike is packing down too much, try loosening it a few clicks

anyway pm me if you need some more help.

Al

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on your jumps, need to get off the seat and center yourself on the bike, your head again should be over the bars slightly.

Lastly, have you been adjusting your suspension ? It appears the rebound is way too tight, when you go thru the small whoops, the bike is packing down too much, try loosening it a few clicks Al

its alot easyer jumping on my new bike, the 02 in the vid had really tall bars and i couldnt get over the front when jumping, and good eye! the springs were for a 180lb rider (im 110lbs). but yea ill have to try the arching back and stuff. i noticed ryan villopoto is really arched and his neck is so close to the bars when coming out of corners and stuff

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It seems like you need to work more on flat corners. Almost all the corners in that video were bermed. The one flat corner you were considerably slower in then the rest of the turns.

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Your overall technique looks pretty good. BUt you would have to come to one of my schools in order for me to really tell if there are some important techniques that need improvement and I would say there is cuz everyone has some. :worthy: You may be at the level where it would take a major life style change to get much faster. Committ to it, spend all your time and energy on getting faster; practice, train, race, eat, sleep motocross. 👍

Gary Semics

www.gsmxs.com

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Your not doing too bad, one thing I notice, your back is straight up, you should try to arch your back a bit to get your head closer to over the bars, it will help your center of gravity and the bike will not want to stand up in turns.

bend your elbows out and push on the bars ( forward ) you will see this will help with any arm pump.

on your jumps, need to get off the seat and center yourself on the bike, your head again should be over the bars slightly.

Lastly, have you been adjusting your suspension ? It appears the rebound is way too tight, when you go thru the small whoops, the bike is packing down too much, try loosening it a few clicks

anyway pm me if you need some more help.

Al

👍:worthy::busted:

Do not arch your back. Good posture leads to good technique. Do not stand up on the jump unless you have to. The less you stand the less energy you're expending. If it's rough, or the jump's a kicker, then you stand. But if you can, sit.

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👍:worthy::busted:

Do not arch your back. Good posture leads to good technique. Do not stand up on the jump unless you have to. The less you stand the less energy you're expending. If it's rough, or the jump's a kicker, then you stand. But if you can, sit.

You should always be standing if you can. You actually use less energy. This also makes the bike center of balance better and makes the suspension react the way it should. How many pros sit all the time?

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You should always be standing if you can. You actually use less energy. This also makes the bike center of balance better and makes the suspension react the way it should. How many pros sit all the time?

Oooooh... so THAT'S why I see James Stewart standing when he's in a smooth straight away. No.

Let's break this down. You're telling me that I use less energy to stand up than I do to sit here in a chair? No... then why would it be any different on a dirtbike? You let the suspension do its job. Center of balance better if you're standing? Wrong again. The LOWER the center of balance the better ANYTHING will handle. If you stand, your c.o.g. is higher -- therefore not as good of handling.

You sit whenever you can, stand if you have to. I'm not going to make any assumptions about you, but I ride with a couple of AMA pros that give me tips. We're talking night event supercross riders who I feel 100% certain could wax 99.9% of the people on this site. I think I'll take their word for it. Do you watch much MX? Riders only stand when it's too rough to sit.

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One thing i noticed is you tend to coast just a little bit before every corner and you roll through a part of the corner, If possible, try braking later and accelerating sooner. You already rail corners, but it will help to pick up a second or two every lap.

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And another thing. What is Stefan Everts known most for? He stands A LOT more than any of the other riders do. It works for him, but the vast majority of riders are faster sitting.

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You look stiff on the bike man. Also it looks like you need to get further foward on the seat and put your leg out foward, not down and drag it.

I have always been told to stand as much as possable because its less energy and lowers the CG.

OT, but do I know you? Were you the one at Pro Source when your mom backed into that ford truck?

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I have always been told to stand as much as possable because its less energy and lowers the CG.

Opposite. It uses more energy, and raises the C.O.G.

Sitting in a chair uses less energy than standing, why would it be different on a bike? Use the suspension... that's what it's there for.

As for standing lowering the COG, how would that even make sense? When you stand up your are moving more weight higher up... that would raise the COG.

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Yea its more physics then your just higher up. When sitting on your seat, the weight is higher up, on the seat. While standing, the weight is INFACT lower because it is all on the pegs.

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Yea its more physics then your just higher up. When sitting on your seat, the weight is higher up, on the seat. While standing, the weight is INFACT lower because it is all on the pegs.

Is that why Road Racers stand up everywhere they go? Because it lowers their COG?

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Races are won in the corners. Don't coast. In motocorss your either on the gas or on the brakes.

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Standing has a number of benefits:

1) It helps you align your CG with the bike CG. It also helps keeping your bodies inertia balanced with your CG. Example, when you accelerate, you lean forward allowing your weight counteract your interia of rotating backwards (rotating about the balls of your feet on the pegs). If you don't balance your inertia with the your CG, you have to counteract with a force, meaning you use more of your arm muscles. For those of you who are mechanical engineers, do a free body diagram and an intertia diagram (F=ma, T=I(thetadouble dot), you'll know what I'm talking about.

2) Your legs are your best suspension. I get more beat up sitting down than when I'm standing.

3) You can allow the bike to bounce around under you, rather than having the bike through you around.

I don't buy the chair analogy. It's fine if you are static (not moving). Imagine sitting on the floor with your legs and arms folded. Now imagine someone comes and pushes you. You will fall over. Now try that standing up with your feet spread out and your hands touching a desk. You have leverage, it is much harder for someone to push you over.

By sitting on the seat, all your weight is perched on top of the seat. As soon as you hit a bump, all that energy that is not absorbed by your suspension gets sent to your butt, and tries to through you over the bars. Standing up allows that energy to to be absorbed by your legs.

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Opposite. It uses more energy, and raises the C.O.G.

Sitting in a chair uses less energy than standing, why would it be different on a bike? Use the suspension... that's what it's there for.

As for standing lowering the COG, how would that even make sense? When you stand up your are moving more weight higher up... that would raise the COG.

Don't make a fool of yourself. Only place you should be sitting down is in the corners. Standing up may use more energy but he didn't ask us what uses for energy. And it doesn't matter what uses more energy, standing up is faster. Why did Gary Semics practice with his seat off?

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Standing has a number of benefits:

1) It helps you align your CG with the bike CG. It also helps keeping your bodies inertia balanced with your CG. Example, when you accelerate, you lean forward allowing your weight counteract your interia of rotating backwards (rotating about the balls of your feet on the pegs). If you don't balance your inertia with the your CG, you have to counteract with a force, meaning you use more of your arm muscles. For those of you who are mechanical engineers, do a free body diagram and an intertia diagram (F=ma, T=I(thetadouble dot), you'll know what I'm talking about.

2) Your legs are your best suspension. I get more beat up sitting down than when I'm standing.

3) You can allow the bike to bounce around under you, rather than having the bike through you around.

I don't buy the chair analogy. It's fine if you are static (not moving). Imagine sitting on the floor with your legs and arms folded. Now imagine someone comes and pushes you. You will fall over. Now try that standing up with your feet spread out and your hands touching a desk. You have leverage, it is much harder for someone to push you over.

By sitting on the seat, all your weight is perched on top of the seat. As soon as you hit a bump, all that energy that is not absorbed by your suspension gets sent to your butt, and tries to through you over the bars. Standing up allows that energy to to be absorbed by your legs.

Couldn't have said it better myself.

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Standing has a number of benefits:

1) It helps you align your CG with the bike CG. It also helps keeping your bodies inertia balanced with your CG. Example, when you accelerate, you lean forward allowing your weight counteract your interia of rotating backwards (rotating about the balls of your feet on the pegs). If you don't balance your inertia with the your CG, you have to counteract with a force, meaning you use more of your arm muscles. For those of you who are mechanical engineers, do a free body diagram and an intertia diagram (F=ma, T=I(thetadouble dot), you'll know what I'm talking about.

2) Your legs are your best suspension. I get more beat up sitting down than when I'm standing.

3) You can allow the bike to bounce around under you, rather than having the bike through you around.

I don't buy the chair analogy. It's fine if you are static (not moving). Imagine sitting on the floor with your legs and arms folded. Now imagine someone comes and pushes you. You will fall over. Now try that standing up with your feet spread out and your hands touching a desk. You have leverage, it is much harder for someone to push you over.

By sitting on the seat, all your weight is perched on top of the seat. As soon as you hit a bump, all that energy that is not absorbed by your suspension gets sent to your butt, and tries to through you over the bars. Standing up allows that energy to to be absorbed by your legs.

1.) Why do you sit when you corner then? Wouldn't you want you COG as low as possible when you're in the corner? Because if you stand, you're more likely to fall over because your COG is higher.

2.) & 3.) Like I said, if it's too rough, stand. Otherwise, sit and let the suspension do its work. No, it's not necessarily easier on your body, but does that mean it's wrong?

And I don't know what kinda riding you do, but nobody tries to shove me off my bike when I'm riding, and I certainly don't ride with my legs and arms crossed. If you're sitting on a rocking horse and someone shoves you, you're less likely to fall off than if you're standing on the rocking horse.

You guys really need to ride more and watch more MX. Watch how much the pros sit vs. standing. The stand only when it's too rough to sit.

What class do you ride?

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