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2 Strokes and Enduros

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Might sound like a noob question and Im not tryin to start another 2 vs. 4 battle, but I was wondering why you see so many 2 strokes in Enduros. I was watching a video on the Erzburg enduro and pretty much everyone is on a 2. All Ive ridden is a 4 and I have no problems on sigle track and rough terrain so what are the benefits of using a 2stroke?

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Pick up a crashed 2 stroke and then a crashed 4 stroke. enough said

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Pick up a crashed 2 stroke and then a crashed 4 stroke. enough said

👍 well said! Two strokes are so much lighter and nimble compairing to 4 strokes. Ever since I bought my smoker my WR450 is collecting dust. I think I better start riding it or I'm gonna rack up to many hours on my smoker.

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Power to weight ration is the biggest factor. The lack of weight on 2 strokes makes them easier to manuever in hard places like rock gardensand over large stumps

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Four strokes are more likely to overheat in tight slow going.

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I've raced enduros (normal ones, not erzberg), and I do alot of fairly extreme technical riding. I generally prefer a 2-stroke for light weight, simplicity, reliability, easy maneuvering, and easy starting. Plus I find with my riding style, a 2-stroke is alot harder for me to stall (I tend to short shift, and carry momentum at pretty low rpms).

When a course is more flowing and less technical (like china hat or idaho city) i think i'm a little faster on my 4-stroke, but the difference is subtle.

I think it's not just a 4-stroke/2stroke thing tho, but particular sorts of 2-strokes. The ones you see at erzberg are mostly 250/300 off-road 2-strokes, which are very torquey and easy to ride motors in extreme technical stuff. if you tried the same course on an unmodified mx 2-stroke, you might find it more difficult.

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The main benefit that I can see/feel is the weight. I never had issues overheating a 4t and yet I do with my 300 2t, go figure. The 300 is so much lighter though and yes it's easier to work on. I would however say, that IMO the 4t's climb better and get better/more traction, could be ridding style though???

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It was interesting a while back a guy posted about how a RM250 was the only bike that didnt overheat in an enduro that he ran.

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since I got my KTM 250exc last month my CRF450 has been sitting in my garage on its stand looking pretty but not getting any attention.....my 250 is just so much easier to ride in tight, slow speed situations.

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since I got my KTM 250exc last month my CRF450 has been sitting in my garage on its stand looking pretty but not getting any attention.....my 250 is just so much easier to ride in tight, slow speed situations.

It sounds like you and I are in the same boat here. I got a CRF 250X last fall and got an 06 KTM 200XC in the spring. The CRF has been designated as the backup bike, or trail bike when I ride with the girlfriend. There is no comparison, the KTM is way easier to ride in the tight woods. Plus not to mention the weight difference between the two.

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-Lighter

-Quicker

-Easier starting

-Less stall-prone

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It sounds like you and I are in the same boat here. I got a CRF 250X last fall and got an 06 KTM 200XC in the spring. The CRF has been designated as the backup bike, or trail bike when I ride with the girlfriend. There is no comparison, the KTM is way easier to ride in the tight woods. Plus not to mention the weight difference between the two.

even though on paper my KTM is heavier than my CRF, my CRF FEELS much heavier in all aspects, but nothing beats the CRF for wide open desert running.

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-Lighter

-Quicker

-Easier starting

-Less stall-prone

I dont see how these bikes are less prone to stalling, unless you use a FWW.

even though on paper my KTM is heavier than my CRF, my CRF FEELS much heavier in all aspects, but nothing beats the CRF for wide open desert running.

AMen to that the Xs are great for open desert runs

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I dont see how these bikes are less prone to stalling, unless you use a FWW.

They take alot less effort to keep running at low rpm's and have no pop stall/flame out issues. IMO the tighter more technical the trail gets, the easier it is to ride the 2strk. Open the trail up and let it flow, I have the opposite opinion favoring the 4strk.

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Smokers stall all the time in the tight woods, but they start again as soon as you take your foot off the brake. Four strokes don't seem to "self bump start".

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In my experience the 2 strokes don't stall as much in alot of of situations because they have much less engine braking, this allows them to un in gear at lower speed without the clutch pulled in. but thats just how it felt to me

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Smokers stall all the time in the tight woods, but they start again as soon as you take your foot off the brake. Four strokes don't seem to "self bump start".

When I ride tight woods, I let my 2 stroke engine rpm drop down as low as it will possibly go on a regular basis. I rarely ever stall my bike, I have never felt the need for a flywheel weight.

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Maybe I'm just misperceiving (is that a word?) things, but I always get the impression that both my 250, and especially my RM 125, "stall" frequently in tight woods riding with hard braking, but only for a fraction of a second. The fire lights again as soon as your foot lifts off the pedal, because the turning rear wheel bump starts the motor. I did add a a 12 oz FWW to the 250, and now it rarely stalls (either the dead stop stall, or the fraction of a second thing).

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I see your point. Under hard braking a two stroke can stall if you are not careful, but usually in tight woods I am not hard braking. I'm more likely to do that on an mx track.

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