Mounting the tall bike for shorties

HI everyone guys... I'm new here, in the Thumper world, with a 650Xchallenge. My off road experience limited with much easier dirt roads on 1150GS. Now with the lighter, 650 thumper I start trails and more knarly terrain.

My new problem with this bike is the mounting bike when there is no way to use the side stand. Normally I'm "climbing" the bike with the side stand open.

I'm kinda short, so I am not able to throw my leg or knee over the bike when my other foot on the floor. Now I'm working on to jump to a running bike. Let's say I'm on the left side of the bike, so, I'm starting the bike, in first gear, full clutch in, my left foot on the left peg. Letting clutch out, bike moves, all balanced, throw the right leg over it.

It is rather scary for a 54 YO guy like me. :D Is there any "known" or better than my technique for this? Or do you think is OK and should I continue my trials? :worthy:

It is rather scary for a 54 YO guy like me. :D Is there any "known" or better than my technique for this? Or do you think is OK and should I continue my trials? :worthy:

I had considered the same idea but decided it was crazy.

It works well enough on a bicycle, and I'm sure it would be do-able on a motorcycle on a good level surface... but if you had a good level surface you would have used the side-stand. So, long story short, I wouldn't advise it.

I have to use the side-stand down, climb on the pegs method to mount my bike as well (process similar to how you would climb onto a horse). When I'm on the trail I am usually able to find a place where I can get my side stand down (using a rock or whatnot).

If I can't get the sidestand down then I lean the bike over far enough that I can get my leg over. Not sure if leaning the bike that far is an option with a heavy bike like yours though... I'm on a WR250R when I do this. Heavier than a "real" trail machine, but no where near as heavy as yours.

Helps to tip the bike a bit towards yourself to effectively lower the seat an inch or two. If that doesn't work start yoga classes twice weekly. :D

Helps to tip the bike a bit towards yourself to effectively lower the seat an inch or two. If that doesn't work start yoga classes twice weekly. :D

This sounds good but I'd consider another bike.

see if you can lower the bike with the linkage, I know a friend lowered the yzf I sold him with a yamalink and he says it's great, more confident on the trail as well. just a thought

Here in the mountains of WV we never have to worry about such things. One side of the trail is always on the uphill side.

My advice to you is when getting ready to crash, always land on the uphill side. Its much easier to re-mount from that side. :D

Hey DD!

We were riding the Shennandoah 500 dualsport the other weekend with a rider who mounted his 600cc bike with the sidestand down. Then he had to teeter around on the seat and try to lean the bike over the other way to get the kickstand back up. Seemed like a lot of work on the uneven, often off-camber terrain, especially if you’re not that tall.

If you can’t get your leg up and over, your go-and-hop-on technique is fine. With practice, you will become more confident. I use that technique with really tall machines.

A swap to the X-Moto seat, btw, on the X-Challenge will get the seat height down some.

I’m short, too, and I don’t usually use the sidestand when mounting my dirt bike or any tall bike. I think what’s key for me is to get my upper body in position towards the front of the bike and lean down so that I’m not doing such a high kick.

If you leave your XChallenge in first gear, key in the ON position, engine off, sidestand up;

Hold the front brake lever, and while leaning your belly and upper body over the airbox(tank) for support with your head down over the bars to give your legs room to clear any top box or tail bag, lean the bike over towards you a touch, swing your leg over to the right footpeg, squeeze the clutch lever, thumb the starter and you’re ready to go.

You can also use the same technique while the bike is in neutral, key off to get on the bike and then get ready to go from the seated position (if the ground is level and you can reach okay).

Then, again, if you’re not that limber, the above won’t work, I guess. There’s plenty of yoga classes in the City.

Will you be at the Hammer Run?

Thanks to all...

Hi Janet, thanks for the advices. First one making sense perfectly... I'll try on my next ride.

Will you be at the Hammer Run?

I'm afraid not. I crashed last week at Pine Barrens and I have two fractures on my left foot...:worthy: I hit it to an invisible (to me) log in the fire-cut. I'm healing alright, don't worry.:D

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=374825&page=28

I was expecting to see you there actually. I met "2fast4u" from TT though.

BTW, as a shodan aikidoist, I ain't need no stinkin' yoga classes...:ride:

Ouch, DD! What a bummer and on Friday. Well, it could always be worse. Sometimes riding the edges of rocky trails trying to avoid the loose stuff, I get nailed by an unseen rock or branch on the side, too. Tuff to avoid in a narrow firecut.

The PB300 was for bigger bikes. We just got Adv bikes and they're not set up yet w/ protection and knobbies yet.:D

We'll do the Hammer and Meteor DS on the trail bikes and hope to see you soon!

Heal well!

D D

I have the same trouble with short legs. One thing to do is pay attention to where you stop, if possible look for a rut to place your bike in or a bump or stump to stand on. While this is not always possible it helps.

I do use the hop-on the bike while moving and it works well, you can also hop-off the bike when stopping also.

Another thing to do is practice riding slow like a trials rider while standing, this will help in the technical sections.

Good Luck!

....... you can also hop-off the bike when stopping also.

Another thing to do is practice riding slow like a trials rider while standing, this will help in the technical sections.

Good Luck!

Thanks my friend, these are the real life ideas and experiences I was loking for.

:D

Best

I'm between 506-507 likley much closer to 506 since I'm getting older. I have spent many years on a XR650R. I looked like a miget on an elephant ridding that bike. I shaved the seat lowered the fork tubes in the clamps and used a Kouba lowering link. The lowering link changed the suspention alittle for me but I was ok with that. I even had to cut the kickstand down almost two inches because of the mods.

The end result was a bike that was less prone to falling over while stopping a un-ever treain, easier to start w/o the kickstand and much easier to mount in any condition.

18" Rear wheel???

Bah, you're not that old. Just a young whippersnapper.

I've been using the "swing your leg over while letting out the clutch" on more level surfaces. I'm hoping to get comfortable enough with it to use it on trails and such. I also make use of any stump, rock, log, high spot, rut, high side of the trail, or whatever I can find in the woods to remount. I figure anything is legal if it works. :lol:

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