Rode an XR650R that cornered better than mine, why?

Rode an XR650R in Baja last weekend that felt better in corners at speed than my 650R. Only major difference Scotts stabilizer. Do those really make a difference in cornering?

There are alot of things you can do to change the handling. When I bought my 2nd 650R, it was completely stock. My 2000 handled way better than my 2001 until I swapped all the goodies.

I just bought a stabilizer for my KTM. It makes a huge difference on that bike.

How about your sag set up? I love my scotts, but, maybe thats not the hole answer.

Jim

Rode an XR650R in Baja last weekend that felt better in corners at speed than my 650R. Only major difference Scotts stabilizer. Do those really make a difference in cornering?

The only majorpart is the Scotts, but its the minor differences that can make a huge difference in handling.

There are a number minor things that taken alone or together can & do add up to a huge diff. in feel ~ slightly differerant spring rates, slightly different valving, slightly different sag, slightly different fork height, slightly different tires, slightly diffferent tire pressure, slightly different... etc & so on

And don't forget the most important little thing to making a 650R turn...

The rear wheel placement. The farther forward it is, the better it will turn. A cheap severely stretched chain on one 650R with a brand new one on the other (gearing being the same) can show a difference in handling.

Most that race Baja have their forks pushed up at least 5mm and are running 5mm spring shims with right springs and suspension valved right. Super huge difference. There race sag is set right. Huge difference. Back wheel as far forward as possible big difference. Steering Damper hug difference. Bars are further forward and taller.

How come no one metioned that BTW.. They have completely different frames!! That may effect the handling if the frame design is different. The R has a light alluminum frame and ppl subconsiously steer with the explosive power wether it be just slightly or full out drift mode in fact during all the reviews done "steering with the rear wheel" is the perfered methiod. This works well on the track but in the woods you must be very concious of the terrain or you will end up on your ass.

Good points guys, didn't think about sag and fork height or for that matter even rear tire placement. My suspension was setup a few years ago by Precision Concepts, was in a hurry so I brought entire bike to them and I was told they set up everything to my riding style and weight. Suspension wise my bike feels better in whoops and even just choppy dirt rodes so I am happy there. Rear axle is towards front of swing arm so it sounds like I need to experiment with fork height or rear sage. Any recommendations?

How come no one metioned that BTW.. They have completely different frames!! That may effect the handling if the frame design is different. The R has a light alluminum frame and ppl subconsiously steer with the explosive power wether it be just slightly or full out drift mode in fact during all the reviews done "steering with the rear wheel" is the perfered methiod. This works well on the track but in the woods you must be very concious of the terrain or you will end up on your ass.

I'll vouch for this......my XR pitched me twice this summer, second time: separated shoulder and 4 broken ribs.....gave me an idea why so many clean bikes get sold by folks in their 50's........get away, I'm keeping mine and riding it in a few minutes............:D

How come no one metioned that BTW.. They have completely different frames!! That may effect the handling if the frame design is different. The R has a light alluminum frame and ppl subconsiously steer with the explosive power wether it be just slightly or full out drift mode in fact during all the reviews done "steering with the rear wheel" is the perfered methiod. This works well on the track but in the woods you must be very concious of the terrain or you will end up on your ass.

Both bikes are XR650R's. No L's here.

Fork hight adj is huge.

mike

Good points guys, didn't think about sag and fork height or for that matter even rear tire placement. My suspension was setup a few years ago by Precision Concepts, was in a hurry so I brought entire bike to them and I was told they set up everything to my riding style and weight. Suspension wise my bike feels better in whoops and even just choppy dirt rodes so I am happy there. Rear axle is towards front of swing arm so it sounds like I need to experiment with fork height or rear sage. Any recommendations?

Adjust rear sag closer to 3 3/4 inches and push forks about 1/8 inch above the top triple clamp and it will turn much better. Don't overdo, though, or you will lose some straight line stability.

:D

And don't forget the most important little thing to making a 650R turn...

The rear wheel placement. The farther forward it is, the better it will turn. A cheap severely stretched chain on one 650R with a brand new one on the other (gearing being the same) can show a difference in handling.

A new shorter chain, adjusted as short as possible, made a difference for me.

Speaking of shorter chains, I had my 650 in the bed a truck next to a 600, major difference in length. Shorter chain would help that.

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