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Learning from Experience (NOT!)

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Good Saturday evening to you all.

I am not prone to posting general complaints on open forums, I would much rather post some helpful advice or share in some uplifting experience. But that's not going to happen tonight.

I spent a good portion of the day changing my worn out Dunlop 755 (non DOT) for a new 606 which is DOT. No real problems with the exchange other than the usual buffoonery. (busted knuckles and choice curse words)

My problem is that I cannot keep from popping holes in my old and now new inner tubes. I have now screwed up three good inner tubes. It appears as if I am pinching these tubes with the tire tools or possibly the sidewall of the tire pinches the tube. In my last try, it was definitely the tool because the hole in the tube matched the head of the tire tool.

After my first screw-up. I took my time and carefully followed any and all advice found on this forum and outside instruction sources reference here also. I was very cautious to move the tube out of the way before inserting the tire tool so as to avoid another pinch. My tools are two shorts Motion pro tire tools and one long tire spoon. I am using powder on the tubes and inside the tire. I am putting a slight bit of air in the new tubes so the will not be prone to twisting.

I am wise enough to know that no written instructions or "you tube clips of some expert" will be perfect. One must learn from experience and a few failures is the price.

But I am dammmm sure tired of hearing that hissss after putting in these expensive new tubes.

I am not really looking for any particular advice, though you are all invited to share what you know or just laugh at my exeperience. I am sure you all have been there whether it was tire repair or engine overhaul.

Hope you all can get out and ride tomorrow. Asfor me, I am patching these flats and trying again.

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I've changed my own, just to prove I could do it... but concluded it wasn't worth it. Now I take it to a place with a mc tire changing apparatus. They have 3 foot spoons, do this everyday and include the rimlocks. They charge $20 per tire... well worth it.

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Ahhhhh, the pain....very familiar I'm sorry to say. Make sure your tools are smooth, sand or file if not. Use lube, and try to get as far as you can without the tire irons at all. Only use them towards the end when you have to. Speaking only for myself, the success comes in waves. I went through what you are experiencing out on the trail a while back, it sucked, I went through my entire patch kit in one sitting. Finally, got it right. Keep at it and you can be sure that when you are out someplace and someone else has a flat your newfound wisdom will help. Ever try doing a paddle tire??? Extremely hard.

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I'm not saying it to be a jerk, but if you're struggling or muscling a tire on or off, your technique isn't right. It's just that simple. It's not hard, it's just a method that if you follow and have reasonably good tools it will be painless.

Here's part 1 of the vid that shows you a simple, no BS way of changing a tire that if you follow, you'll have no problems.

The other 2 parts can be accessed by the related vids. I do it pretty much exactly like he does, and I have no problems.

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I have had good luck by taking all the air out of the tube. Laying it in the tire flat. To inflate you put in about 5 lbs and bounce the tire. Do this a couple of times to make sure the tube isn't kinked.

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Swingset

Thanks much for the link to the videos. He sure makes it look easy. I will have to try his technique.

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In 40 plus years I've changed very few tires. The

last one I changed was probably close to 40 years

ago, and I did just as you.....pinched holes in the

tube. I know that there are those that don't like

to pay anyone else to do things they can do, or

feel that they can do, but sometimes IMO it just

isn't worth it. My local Cycle Gear will mount and

balance the tire whether you buy it from them or

not for 20 bucks. For that kind of money it isn't

worth it to me to even deal with. I can drive there

pay 20 bucks and be back home quicker then I can

do it myself, just mounting it.

I'll choose my battles:lol:

Regards Sonny

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Never lift the spoon more then 90 degrees to the rim, thats straight up perpendicular....if you go further with it, the tube will pinch. If you can't get the tire on without going past 90 your taking too much of a bite. Small sections at a time!

Just to be sure, you do have one side of the tire on the rim first before putting the tube in right? dumb question I know.

The final side I just push both my knees around the tire to hold it, while levering it on. I put tires on with 1 spoon and take them off with 2

Good luck :D

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When installing a tube, inflate it just enough to give it shape. This prevents 99% of tube pinches from tire levers.

+1 use more air in the tube. It will move out of the way instead of getting under your tool.

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go inside and pinch your missus's bottle of shampoo, shes not gonna like it but i have never pinched a tube but i also put some air in it before i get to the end and inflate and deflate the tube a few times in the tire to seat the tire before i inflate it properly

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:worthy: fter tube is in,inflate to lift side of tire up,lube tire beed in&under,pull stem guts out,spoon tire on not taking big bites,make sure opp side is in well center,finish,guts in,inflate.tire has powder in it,tools and rim clean of any burrs,take your time...:ride: :ride: :D

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Just one of those "getting a knack" for it things.

I've pinched a few tubes myself, but I find that if I let the tire warm up a bit it becomes easier to work with, and I'm less likely to have to manhandle it enough to pinch a tube.

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a tire changing stand or even a bucket helps a ton to get the tire on as far as possible with no tools. my motionpro long spoon had a nasty jagged lip on it. i just sanded it off. good luck!

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a tire changing stand or even a bucket helps a ton to get the tire on as far as possible with no tools. my motionpro long spoon had a nasty jagged lip on it. i just sanded it off. good luck!:D

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If you havent seen it watch the video in the earlier post link!

Dan

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When installing a tube, inflate it just enough to give it shape. This prevents 99% of tube pinches from tire levers.

that and some sort of lube/water spray is the best advice you can give anybody. and just make sure your tube isnt pinched up in your bead lock/s i run 2 so i have to watch out. after that the biggest pain should be stretching the new tire onto the rim.

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