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Physical needs for mx!

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Im looking for results about how motocross is the most physically demanding to prove some of my friends wrong. Also when i go practice it doesnt feel really that demanding but is it most physically needy in the pros than just local races or practices? :lol:

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lend them ur bike for a moto.. then see what they have to say afterwards... (best and really the only way to prove it is to show um).. it wont take long for them to find out.

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and make sure when you do you take them on a day that the track isn't prepped? Make them really work.

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Also when i go practice it doesnt feel really that demanding

The top pros are very very fit, but the average motorcyclist is not, and the average motorcyclist doesn't ride very hard either. If you were to compare average participants, mx-ers would probably get dogged up by soccer players in terms of fitness, but at very high levels, the mx-ers are comparable with other elite athletes.

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It definitely gets more demanding as your speed picks up and the racing gets more intense. Generally speaking your top pros run a steady heartrate of between 180 and 200 bpm. That is pretty much like going out and running as hard as you can for 30 minutes. So using that as an example if you are riding hard at your local race it should be like running as hard as you can for 12-15 minutes. I race Open A and Vet A. For me I am not racing up to my potential if I have not trained hard enough to maintain a heartrate of 160-180 for at least 20 minutes. This is just taking into consideration the endurance needed and not even taking into account the muscle strength and muscle endurance required. Until your friends have thrown around a 200+ pd bike at race pace for 20+ minutes, hell even 10 minutes they will never understand.:lol: In their minds the bike will always be doing all the work and all you do is stear. :p

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Ahhhh that takes me back to the school days of kids saying to me "How hard can it be? you just sit on the bike and turn the throttle" Man that used to make me angry. What everyone is saying about the level you ride at being the key is spot on I mean I can cruise around at an average pace all day but when your riding at 100 percent its very demanding, Like slinky said the only way they will believe you is if they give it a go!!

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I believe that motocross is one of the most demanding sports physically...That being said Pro riders with lots of skill and talent waste less energy than say your average novice rider...For example I ride a motocross and I am ready to pass out afterwards. Part of the problem is I am wasting alot of energy on balance and technique(things that come second nature to a pro). This is true with alot of sports...I also skateboard and play ice hockey. I skate at a very high level in pools and vert ramps. I can put togeather a run on a ramp or a pool that is very long where most people get tired I just keep going.....I get on ice skates and play with my hockey team and I am gasping for air in 30 seconds.. Skateboarding is second nature to me....Ice skating is not second nature..I can do it and get around but I work more at balance and moves than just doing them....There are a few Canadians that come out and play with us who bye all acounts dont look to be in good shape at all....They skate circles around me and keep up the high rate of play the whole game....They grew up doing it and it is second nature to them....I guess what I am trying to say is a novice rider will use alot more energy to go slower than a Pro will....An out of shape pro will be able to ride faster longer than an a novice who is in incredible shape. I know I rambled.

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