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Quick Tips everyone should know - please add your favorite(s)!

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I was just wishing there was a thread of quick tips and, since I didn't find one, how about we compile one?

1. Slightly loosen the clutch and front brake perch clamps - just enough so they'll move but only if you force them using two hands. You won't even know they're "loose" but they'll survive crash after crash (not that I would know...)

2. Always change your oil BEFORE you wash your bike, then you don't have to take your skid plate off or worry about missing the stupid tiny hole when refilling.

3. Use a cleaning product called "Oops, Multi-Purpose Remover." This great smelling (very important) product easily gets off all the black marks, grime, exhaust mung (for you 2-strokers) from number plates and fenders - but - it doesn't hurt stick-on numbers or dull the plastic.

4. Keep a spare air filter and cage oiled and ready in a big zip-lock bag. Then when you're done washing your bike, you swap out the filter and you're ready to ride (after you check the spokes, of course). Then you can take your time servicing the dirty filter and getting it back in the bag.

5. You know those spare visor screws that come with new helmets and then immediately disappear? Put them in a plastic bag and stick it in one of those outside gear bag pockets that never get used. Add spare goggle lenses, carburetor jets and any papers/maps that are riding-specific (e.g., kids ATV licenses here in CA) and you'll always have them when you need them.

6. Use dutch cleanser and a flat scrub brush on your seat covers to make them look like new. (This is something we Honda aluminum-framed riders have been doing since '97 as the aluminum oxide rubs off on the inside of your boots and then makes it's way up onto the sides of the seats - ugh.)

7. Always replace the cheap factory chrome-reverse muffler bearings with stainless steel units (Works Connection). The SS muffler bearings help the exhaust roll out approximately 50% more efficiently.

I couldn't resist, hopefully you know No. 7 is a joke but I'm anxious to hear about any other real "quick tips."

Thanks,

redfever

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Another item I have found that removes the boot marks from your plastic, is a little white pad called Magic Eraser. My wife buys them for around the house, but one always finds it's way into the garage.

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A "quick fix" to re-energize a weak flux capacitor is to tape it to a 9 volt battery with electric tape. I stress electric tape because duct tape can actually reverse the effect, and can cause resistance to the current.

Read up on ohms law and you'll understand.

:worthy::eek::banghead::bonk::lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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:worthy:TOILET PAPER IN YOUR TRUCK AT ALL TIMES!!!! I cant tell you how many times we go out in the desert to ride, and it never fails, as soon as we unload, someone has some of their own "extra unloading" to do.

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With a new bike, remove the rear wheel and use waterproof grease on the axle adjusters and every time you remove the wheel after that. When they freeze in they are there for good. Also use anti-seize on shroud bolts that go in your tank.

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With a new bike, remove the rear wheel and use waterproof grease on the axle adjusters and every time you remove the wheel after that. When they freeze in they are there for good. Also use anti-seize on shroud bolts that go in your tank.

And use anti-seize on your spark plug. Especially before putting the bike away for the winter....

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clean air filters weekly, oil chains daily, and check for bearing/chain wear whenever possible. if you can find a good oil for bearings you can actually get into the sealed bearings, use it for extra free motion. i find wd-40 works well, but I haven't used it on my dirt bike

and also, check axle torques, and most bolts that experience movement, or vibration daily. if you lose something important, it ruins your day...

use tire goop! if you manage to run over a nail, the tube will seal itself. i reccomend up to twice what the company says

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if you can find a good oil for bearings you can actually get into the sealed bearings, use it for extra free motion. i find wd-40 works well, but I haven't used it on my dirt bike

DO NOT use WD40 in sealed bearings. WD40 is a solvent. All you'll succeed in doing is dissolving the grease in the bearings and ruining them.

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Put gasket adhesive on one side and a little oil or grease on the other side of a gasket so next time you take it apart it comes apart easier and stays in one piece.

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Turn your gas on before hitting the track. We've all done it, and it can cause a serious injury if not discovered before its too late!

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When you come home from the shop with new wheel bearings, toss them in the freezer for a while before installing them.

Then to make installation even more easy, heat the hub a little with a heat gun or torch (careful now). The bearings will dang near "drop in".

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When you come home from the shop with new wheel bearings, toss them in the freezer for a while before installing them.

Then to make installation even more easy, heat the hub a little with a heat gun or torch (careful now). The bearings will dang near "drop in".

double, no, triple check that you have put the wheel spacer back in before putting the last bearing on. I always get my wheel back on then notice the spacer sitting next to the tool box...

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Put gasket adhesive on one side and a little oil or grease on the other side of a gasket so next time you take it apart it comes apart easier and stays in one piece.

An old trick from my muscle car days and Holleys was to use chapstick on the gaskets. For some reason gaskets would stick like crazy to Holleys. Worked great for changing out jets and stuff.

Back to bikes: Clip an extra masterlink somewhere on your bike. Could help you or another rider someday.

Lube the rear brake and kick start lever pivots every few rides. Check spokes after every ride.

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Every time you trailer your bike to go riding, check for your keys before you leave the house.

Because you will forget to do this at least once, keep several paperclips and electrical tape in your tow vehicle and have a basic understanding of which wires do what on your key switch. This doesn't work so well on street bikes with a locking steering stem. BUT!

Keep two vice-grips and a couple screw drivers in your tow vehicle, while not ideal, you can do damn near any repair/temporary fix with a couple of screw drivers and at least two vice grips. Like remove the locking steering stem keyswitch.

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O.K. now I keep toilet paper in the truck and stretch before I ride but...

Last weekend, I discovered that it's a good idea to have "thumpette hygiene products" stuffed into the t.p. tube. (We got to come home early cuz a daughter forgot "stuff.")

Also, on another topic, I shove large soft balls down my buckled up boots to keep the ankles nice and wide. My A-stars hurt my ankles from day 1 until I started cramming balls down to the ankle areas I leave them in my gear bag that way and it keeps the ankle areas from closing in.

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