Trail Rider Magazine review of the WR250R

I just read the review that was written in the November '08 issue of Trail Rider Magazine and I was a little disappointed in some of the comments that were made. They basically say (I'm paraphrasing here) that the STOCK WRR is a good trail bike but not made for riding in enduro races or Hare scrambles, etc...

While I agree that maybe the bike wasn't meant to race "out of the box" as they say in the article, I have personally ridden my WRR in 2 enduro events and the bike performed nicely. I, on the other hand, didn't perform as well. The first enduro (my first one ever) was the 2008 Sparkplug in Washington and I "houred-out" by checkpoint 4. The WRR wasn't the problem, it was my lack of preparation, conditioning and skill. My second enduro was the 2008 Black Bear, also in Washington and I actually finished 4th out of 9 riders in the "Sportsman" class. Keep in mind that the bike is entirely stock with the exception of the handguards, skidplate and the removal of turn signals. I even used the terrible stock tires.

blackbearenduro08.jpg

My point is that while there may be better bikes out there for competing in enduro races, etc... the Wr250R is a very capable bike... and with just a few simple and relatively inexpensive mods, (like tires, sprockets and maybe exhaust), this bike could be competitive with a good rider.

If anyone has any similar experiences or just a thought about this, I'd be interested in hearing about it.

If you're interested in reading about my rides, go HERE.

It depends on the level of competition IMO. If you are an intermediate or advanced rider, the WRR would not be the ticket. For more casual competition, I think it is just fine as long as you don't have to pick it up much.

wr250r is a Dual Sport bike. Can you race the wr250r? yes of course. After the race you get to ride yours back home. 99% of the other racers can't.:moon::thumbsup:

It depends on the level of competition IMO. If you are an intermediate or advanced rider, the WRR would not be the ticket. For more casual competition, I think it is just fine as long as you don't have to pick it up much.

I agree that if you put "Rider A" on the WR (with good tires, etc...) and had him (or her) race an enduro event... and then put the same "Rider A" on a bike specifically designed for enduros, they'd more than likely perform better on the non-WR bike.

My point was merely that if a "C" class rider, (me), can complete an enduro and finish 4th out of 9 on a completely stock WRR (bad tires), an "A" class rider would do just fine in an enduro on a WRR (with proper tires).

I'm just saying the bike is better and more capable than they give it credit for, that's all.

Credit or not, i love my WRR.

:thumbsup:

SjSabre and I are going to be riding our WRR's in C class next weekend at a

Hare Scramble in Hollister. It's more about just going out and finishing and

having some fun doing it.

None of this serious stuff:ride: !!!

Trailmoto I think it's great you have already raced in two enduros. Especially with the stock tires!! My hat is off to you.

Now, I saw the Trail Rider WR250R article and I think it's pretty accurate. For hard core trail racers the bike isn't light enough nor does it have enough suspension. No A or AA riders are going to race a WR-R. That said, if you really want a dual sport that could handle an enduro or hare scramble, especially with the appropriate mods, then this is the bike for you.

If anyone has any similar experiences or just a thought about this, I'd be interested in hearing about it.

My thoughts are that it is a dual-sport, and so it has some disadvantages in serious competitions. Yamaha makes other models for competition. So if they were discussing winning, they are right.

I don't see why you couldn't have a lot of fun on one, though. Tires suitable for the conditions, and maybe a big rear sprocket, are in order.

I'd keep the stock turn signals, brake light, horn, and tag on there - to "make the point". Aw, I might take the tag off at the beginning if it would get damaged.

I'd keep the stock turn signals, brake light, horn, and tag on there - to "make the point".

Shhhh about the horn, that's the secret weapon. Imagine pulling up on a

rider and then just laying on the horn out in the brush.:thumbsup:

Guaranteed they're gonna bobble or crash and you'll gain a spot!:moon: :moon: :ride:

Being one of the very few on here, if not the only, to have

this bike set up for off road only, I will say it is not a race

winning bike. Its great fun, but not a racer. I will probably

do some enduro type races, but only for fun. Im not an

expert level rider by any means. The reason I purchased this

bike initially was due to the EFI. I think after having done

some mods that this bike is very capable of handling trails,

very light tracks, and just consistent enjoyment. Beyond that,

it would take a lot more work to improve the suspension,

reduce weight, and improve the power curve.

Anyway....JMO. I think Yamaha has done an excellent

job of producing a great DUEL SPORT.....it is what it is.

At least until someone like me tries to turn it into something

else. But what was I supposed to do.....I wanted EFI...

I watched a WR250R racer complete a sandwash infested rolling rocky desert race last weekend. Sixty five miles. The guy was on the gas and finished well in his class. I believe he was a B rider, and the bike made it unscathed.

Impressive but nothing matched the guy on the 1983 Honda XR350!

Yet again... I'm not, nor have I ever been, arguing that the WRR is, or even designed to be a highly competitve off-road racer. All I'm saying is that the review that was written makes it sound like a campground bike. Here's a quote from the article: "We plunked ourselves down on the seat, thumbed it to life and cruised the local dirt roads, stopping to explore along the way." That was the type of riding they used for the review... they didn't even give it a chance on some singletrack or tight trails. Yes, I agree that the bike was meant for dirt roads, etc... Hell, that's what I primarily use mine for. It just seemed a little condescending for them to basically thumb their nose at the outrageous concept of racing it. (In fact they actually say NOT to race it.)

I started this thread to get thoughts and ideas and so far it's worked. Thanks for the opinions. I'm curious if anyone has actually competed in any organized event and if so, how the bike worked for them.

I'll probably attempt another enduro (or two) next year but I'll only do it with good tires. The "Deathwings" are horrible in the slippery stuff and I think that's what wore me out so quickly... well that and my pure lack of skill.

Thanks again everyone.

I watched a WR250R racer complete a sandwash infested rolling rocky desert race last weekend. Sixty five miles. The guy was on the gas and finished well in his class. I believe he was a B rider, and the bike made it unscathed.

That's what I like to hear!

My thoughts are that it is a dual-sport, and so it has some disadvantages in serious competitions. Yamaha makes other models for competition. So if they were discussing winning, they are right.

They weren't specifically discussing winning... but I think it's implied that if you enter a race, you'd like to have a chance. Winning any race on a primarily stock WRR would be a feat for sure, if not impossible. But I think the limitations of the bike aren't as limiting as the review would indicate.

Trailmoto I think it's great you have already raced in two enduros. Especially with the stock tires!! My hat is off to you.

Thank-you for the compliment

Now, I saw the Trail Rider WR250R article and I think it's pretty accurate. For hard core trail racers the bike isn't light enough nor does it have enough suspension. No A or AA riders are going to race a WR-R.

Not all racers are "hard core", nor are they all A or AA riders either. If the article had said: "if you're a Class A or AA rider, don't bother trying to race this bike" then this thread wouldn't exist.

They just condemned this bike to the likes of the old trail 90 where you give your kid a ride down the street and back and I thought it was a bit unfair.

To be fair to them however, they had a lot of great things to say about the WRR... but we all already knew how great it is. :thumbsup:

If you're feeling like your dual sport bike is misunderstood and under appreciated... then get used to it.

I don't know why anyone would be surprised by that.

I rode with a group of guys today who were mostly all on KTM's, (one WRF)

Sure a 300 2T XC is gonna be lighter, more powerful and easier to blast around on the trails.

It's also gonna set you back 8 Gees and it ain't gonna be able to run down to

the store for a loaf of bread...:moon::thumbsup:

It's also gonna set you back 8 Gees and it ain't gonna be able to run down to

the store for a loaf of bread...:moon::thumbsup:

Who can actually stop for a loaf of bread after gettin on this bike?

Ive got a lot of other things to do on this bike then fetch bread....:moon:

Hey, while your out at the local grocer, can you get me some lunch

and bring it by the trails?:ride:

The store is just a bonus.

Too bad you don't have any State Beaches to ride it through in OK!:thumbsup::moon:

I'm just saying the bike is better and more capable than they give it credit for, that's all.

What do they know anyway. They sit around pushing pencils instead of riding motorcycles. :thumbsup: There is always a bias in the magazines. I am sure there are a few things you don't like about the bike also.

It is a capable bike, I have now taken it every where I have taken my WRF.

That being said. If I were going to race in some off road event I would probably take the WRF. I might take the WRR just to prove it can handle it though.

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