arm pump

Hey guys I was just wondering I am a motocross guy who has just started racing some cross country stuff. I rode in the pro class up here in Canadian motocross and man I gotta tell you I have never had arm pump this bad as when Im racing in the bush. Do any of you have any suggestions? like perhaps changing my clutch to a more woodsy style. I heard about some special clutch thru a buddy that is just alot smoother to ride with when bush racing

Thanks for your time

Scotty

You may already be aware of some of these things...maybe all of them. I ride woods, but I set up mx bikes for this application. Some of the things that have helped me...

*Get the suspension set up for the woods terrain. Having it dialed in for the track will kill you in the woods.

*I always install ProTaper Contour bars, fill them with expanding foam (insulating foam from Home Depot-"Great Stuff brand or similar) and install a set of ProComp #714 grips-they're the larger diameter that my hands require and are super cushy gel compound, yet really durable and tacky even when wet and muddy.

All of these mods go a long way in damping vibration transfer through the bars. :thumbsup:

*I installed a Magura Jack hydraulic clutch system on my CRF450R and it made a huge positive difference in the clutch action and eliminated all clutch fade and inconsistent action. :moon: :moon:

*StompGrip traction pads are great for increasing the ability to grip the bike with the knees & lower legs, eliminating the "death grip" with the hands.

*Going up two teeth on the rear sprocket (from stock 48 teeth to 50) made a big difference in changing the final drive ratio to a more woods-friendly ratio, making the woods riding much easier overall.

Hey Scotty did you do some PNWMA races ? What class you racing in ? I've never raced moto but I've raced the offroad series here in BC off and on for a bunch of years now.

What kind of bike are you riding ?

2 stroke I would say heavier flywheel so you don't have to clutch so much and 4 stroke maybe flywheel ? but definately lower your gearing so you won't have to clutch so much.

Good levers with roller bearing's and various perch's can help.

Try to save your energy on the easier sections ( don't go as balls out as you could ) for the gnarlier sections.

You just have to find that happy medium between speed and fatigue factor on a 3hr race.

Hey Scotty did you do some PNWMA races ? What class you racing in ? I've never raced moto but I've raced the offroad series here in BC off and on for a bunch of years now.

What kind of bike are you riding ?

2 stroke I would say heavier flywheel so you don't have to clutch so much and 4 stroke maybe flywheel ? but definately lower your gearing so you won't have to clutch so much.

Good levers with roller bearing's and various perch's can help.

Try to save your energy on the easier sections ( don't go as balls out as you could ) for the gnarlier sections.

You just have to find that happy medium between speed and fatigue factor on a 3hr race.

ahmen brother!!!!!!!

after i get in my rythem i alway start goin to hard and fast and it hurts me in the long run, every race, i have to learn not to do this one.

as far as cluth set up im running the msr bearing clutch perch/lever. nice and easy pull. easier the the maguras ive used but not quite as smooth.

Hey Tribalbc Yah I did some of the pn races,I raced the Big kahuna and the Big rooster this year and I really enjoyed it.Ive never raced woods before so I rode in the junior over class I ride a Kx 450, and yah I found I was trying to go balls out for the first bit and found I was so tired after only a little while of riding.

Hey guys I was just wondering I am a motocross guy who has just started racing some cross country stuff. I rode in the pro class up here in Canadian motocross and man I gotta tell you I have never had arm pump this bad as when Im racing in the bush. Do any of you have any suggestions?

In my experience, you don't get arm pump from the clutch. You get it from using your arms to hang on when you open the throttle. If you're standing up, use your legs and move your weight forward to counteract the acceleration force so your arms aren't working so hard. If you're sitting, just move your weight forward.

Hope that helps.

Hey Tribalbc Yah I did some of the pn races,I raced the Big kahuna and the Big rooster this year and I really enjoyed it.Ive never raced woods before so I rode in the junior over class I ride a Kx 450, and yah I found I was trying to go balls out for the first bit and found I was so tired after only a little while of riding.

Well the big kahuna must have been right up your alley since it's more moto style, not very typcal of the PN races. Big Rooster is also one of the faster more open ones but it's a good example where you could rest on the easier flowier sections for the tighter harder stuff.

Remeber no offroad race is won in the first 1/2 hr. You want a good start but after that you have to know when to settle into a good pace. Better to save some energy for a push at the end when others are getting tired.

I take it you live in the Thomphson/ Okanogan areas with the 2 races you went to. You should think of checking out the OHSS series next season as well. Alot of fun, usually more tech courses, race with your same PN liscence.

A KX450. What year ? I hear the older ones can be pretty hard hitting. That's going to wear you out. Put a heavy flywheel on that thing and gear it right down so you can go a walking pace in first gear. Then you'll hardly touch your clutch :thumbsup:

One thing I forgot. Everyone gets pumped and worked on their first couple off road races. It will all get easier.

Cheers Bro, Yah I live in Merritt. I never would have thought I'd be doing any crosscountry races but the riding up here is awesome I can ride right out of my backyard and be gone for days if I wanted to. Thanks for the advice, Whats your name anyways? Where do you live and what class do you ride? maybe I will see you around next season

Oh yah I gotta tell you the Big rooster was pretty grueling this year, for me anyways, maybe cause it was one of my firsts, I dont know but thanks for the replies.

Talk to you soon

Scotty

Well Merritt is an awesome place to ride. You have your own perfect training ground. Used to be a great race there, The Main Jet. I last raced it in the late 90's I don't know when it stopped happening, I've been out of racing for a bunch of years untill this year I just started again. I race Senior Expert.

Live in Pemberton, name's Sean.

The Big Rooster would have been brutal if we had to do the 2 laps like the Int- Pro's but luckily they kept us old guys at 1. The whoops there wear you down, it's just not that tight compared to other races.

Good to know someone in Merritt. I was just thinking a little while ago how I'd like to go for a ride there again, thinking early next spring, it's usually one of the first good riding areas out of the snow.

You ever race our track here ?

Make sure you don't miss the Monkeywrench next year. It is the race of the series and pretty close to your home turf.

arm pump is natural just avoid carbonated drinks and try to relax, also dont give riding tips to a pro hahahaha:thumbsup:

rekluse pro is supposed to be a great addition for woods racing and should def save some arm pump with less clutch work.

Another thing to try is playing with your lever positions. I like mine forward because it helps keep me over the front of the bike but alot of people tell me that its terrible for arm pump. ( I dont get it real bad though)

I have heard that moving them UP more towards the back of the bike helps.

Softening up the suspension will def help with deflection aswell.

I also agree with the poster that says to increase the rear sprocket a couple teeth makes a world of difference for the tight stuff.. however:

Some will argue that the shorter gearings actually tires you out more because of the increase engine braking effects (4 strokes) so to combat that you can use a flywheel weight. It will decrease the jerkiness and also lead to less clutch use which should all combat arm pump.

The flywheel weight isnt necessary if you go with a rekluse (it already adds weight to flywheel) but it is much cheaper option if ur on a budget.

Yah Merritt is a great place to ride if you ever want to ride here get a hold of me and we will do that. They held a race up at Chattaway until 2 years ago but the guy who promoted that race passed on and since then there has been nothing happening but I was talking to the President of the PNWMA and we might look in to getting that race again maybe for next year so I will keep you posted. I hope to get out to Pemberton's race track this year we will see what happens. Anyways I'll talk to you soon

Scotty

and install a set of ProComp #714 grips-they're the larger diameter that my hands require and are super cushy gel compound

You can also wrap the bars with some fabric tape before installing the grips. This makes the grips a little fatter but I'm not sure it's as useful as some of the following ideas:

*StompGrip traction pads are great for increasing the ability to grip the bike with the knees & lower legs, eliminating the "death grip" with the hands.

I'm only a novice rider but I've been having a lot of problems with overly working my forearms. I've tried to go back to basics, watching DirtWise and reading the Semics book plus talking to other experienced riders. The above is key IMHO and helps a lot. Whenever I feel my arms being tugged I know I'm not gripping the tank. I need to try these StompGrip's, thanks for the tip.

The other thing I've been trying to do is "overgrip" the grips. So the grip is back in your palm in the area where your thumb meets your palm rather than where your palm meets your fingers. Overgripping like this makes it a lot harder to squeeze the living crap out of the bars.

I had a hard time maintaining any throttle control doing this initially, it felt very unnatural, then I read a tip to always cover your clutch/brake with two fingers. Doing this helped to give me back some fine control when I was overgripping.

Overgripping also helps keep your elbows up, another thing I'm crap at :thumbsup:

Ive been reading armpump posts for thirty minutes. There a lot of opinions of how to deal with it. I agree with many; riding technique, after market parts to lessen vibration, ride often, weight lifting or curls, at least that is what works for me. But the one thing that I do religiously before a race is; Eat a slightly green banana. Not to green or you may have to stop before the checkered flag. Something about the potassium. Like I said, it works for me. Maybe its a mind thing...

Potassium works for muscle cramps regardless. Before a long ride I always eat a few bananas the day before and start hydrating by drinking a lot of water. I eat one banana before going to ride and drink water as normal during riding. Got rid of all the muscle cramps but armpump can still occur. I wouldn't say it's an end-all solution but definately worth doing before you go ride. You WILL notice a different in your legs for sure after your done.

I weight train regularly and that helps a ton with the arm pump. Also being aware that it is coming on and then relaxing your grip and holding on more with your legs helps stave it off if you do feel it. As someone mentioned you are 'pumped' in general the first couple races, after that it is easy to relax and get into a groove.

I have had compartment tunnell surgery on both my arms (arm pump surgery) If you have true arm pump there are a couple of things you should become aware of

1) weight lifting will only make the problem worse. True arm pump occurs when the forearm muscles are too big for the facia compartment they are located in.

2) some foods with anti inflammatory agents might help a little and some advil might help some as well.

If you have a consistent arm pump feeling while ridding and working out helps than you are describing arm fatigue which is most likely the case in 99% of the riders out there. If you have not had arm fatigue while MXing but you have it when you ride offroad try making some adjustments to your bars, grips, and suspension to make things easier on your arms.

A lot of riders (including myself) commonly mistake the effects of vibration and "death gripping" for arm pump. It's a good idea to make sure you've taken steps to reduce the vibration transfer through the bars and to also concentrate on holding onto the bike more with your legs than with your arms.

I disagree to a point. 'Arm pump' is your muscles swelling up, gorging with blood, 'death griping' will cause your arms to 'pump'.

Weight training will give you toned muscles that are better able to transfer oxygen etc. and better able to handle this increased blood flow. Repeatedly 'pumping' your arms (regular workout) will increase the 'fascial compartments' (simply tough tissue between the individual muscles)... think about it if the compartments were set at birth your arms would never get any bigger... look at guys on 'roids who get huge forearms.. if the compartments couldn't stretch or grow that would be impossible. By toning/stretching/building your forearm muscles the blood will flow in and out of your arms like it is supposed to, not 'pooling up'.

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