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New TTR125 Wiseco Hi Compression Piston 11:1

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Ok im getting a 54mm Wiseco Hi Comp. Piston what i need is instructions and caution tips and tips i have a ring compresser and bout any tool u could imagine so all i need is to know how to use the tools

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You won't need the spring compressor... make sure the cylinder and the piston are well oiled before install. Wiseco should send you installation instructions with the piston.

You'll need to watch the timing chain. It's also a good time to do a cam swap and any other top end work.

You'll need a dental pick to remove the c -clip from the wrist pin opening in the piston.

-Kerry

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well i heard the ring compresser makes the job easier and ok if i need any more help when i get it ill tell how it goes and any more advice would be helpful by anyone

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Pull the engine out of the frame and take your time. everything else is covered above.

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dude thats a 2hr job ........4 in you are slow..........and you dont have to take the engine out on this bike to do the job..............you can , but dont have to...........its more work if you pull it.

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Called Procycle and asked for a TTR125 Wiseco 11:1 Hi Comp. Piston and a New Gasket Set He Said It Would Be $117.95 With Shipping Is That A Good Deal Or A Bad Deal and Can Some One Tell Me How To Make Sure My Timing Is Correct So I Dont Break It As Soon As I Kick It Over

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It's a good deal wiseco marked up all there products for 2008.procycle is great to deal with I bought a lot of items from them.make sure you got a good cross hatch on the cylinder so the ring seat good.

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Look up some discussions about oiling the piston (well) when you install it. Some people say oil it and some say don't because it will glaze the cylinder wall. I'm not going to say one way or another. I don't want to start a fight. I'm just saying look up both sides and make your own decision.

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Its alot easier job with the engine out. The thing I have the most trouble with is the timing chain. I also oiled the piston and rings at reassembly and it ran fine.

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I would agree that the piston job is easier with the engine out. You can do it with the engine installed. I'd think, as a matter of cleanliness and this being the first time you've done it, you'd want to remove the engine.

-Kerry

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but can someone tell me how to make sure my timing will be right so i dont mess it up before i get to ride it

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There are timing marks you'll need to line up. A set for the flywheel and a set for the cam sprocket in the head.

You'll need to take the cam sprocket cover off the head to make sure you're at top dead center. You line up the line on the cam sprocket with the nipple on the top of the head (straight up). You can line these up by opening the center inspection plug (larger of the two) on the flywheel side cover. Place an appropriately sized socket wrench into the hole and engage the flywheel nut. Turn the cam/flywheel until the cam mark is vertical in the upper half of the sprocket and is lined up with the "nipple" at the top of the head.

Open the second of the two inspection plugs on the flywheel side. The upper right hand plug is where the timing marks are visable.

You will see what Yamaha calls the "I" mark. It is a heavier line as you may see some other, lighter lines, near it. It should already be aligned with the "pointer" that you can see.

You'll need to remove the cam chain tensioner and have a way to break loose the bolt on the cam sprocket. Then have a way to hold the cam chain from dropping into the case. It can get a bit hairy trying to manipulate the chain, the sprocket, and the head.

Reinstallation is in reverse, verify your timing marks - the cam tensioner may change how they line up. In our case, the marks weren't 100%. They seem to be about a 1/2 link off.

-Kerry

-Kerry

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a quick question i can get that upper right hand screw off any ideas maybe a local shop?? or a special tool any ideas to get that off??

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guess everyone has their own way to do it.......its easier to do anything on the engine if its out. ......taking it out and putting it back in requires more work than working around the frame. once the head bolts are lose you can move the head around to get the bolts out.....not hard. and the frame holds the engine while you work....its a pain taking the frame cradle off and engine out and the reverse. extra work and time. my crfs have to be pulled to do the work.....but i did the ttr much faster without pulling it...i thought that was a good thing about working on this bike.......jls

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a quick question i can get that upper right hand screw off any ideas maybe a local shop?? or a special tool any ideas to get that off??

Get a impact driver they are about $15-$25 bucks. It is a tool that you hit with a hammer and it then turns the screw out. I use mine every time there is a phillips head on the motor. They work great for master cylinders too. You will never strip out a screw after you use one of these. And they will remove stripped screws also.

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