Need help picking sprokets.

I snaped 3 chains apart in two years.

One was a factoy 2007 YZ450F

Second was a factoy 2008 YZ450F

Third was a RK with about 8 race's on it.

I'm using a DID now i think.

And looking at others

Good info here.

The stock chains are junk. Consider yourself lucky that it didn't break the engine case.

My favorite chain is still the Primary Drive brand. I have the Regina ORN's on now, but to be honest..... I've had to adjust them twice and they only have 40 hours on them. I've had PD's that never needed an initial adjustment. If the Regina's make it 100 hours, I'll be surprised.

I snaped 3 chains apart in two years.

One was a factoy 2007 YZ450F

Second was a factoy 2008 YZ450F

Third was a RK with about 8 race's on it.

I'm using a DID now i think.

And looking at others

Good info here.

A six pack says you run your chain too tight.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?p=7243089#post7243089

i would not buy another vortex rear sprocket again after i purchased a new ek high dollar chain it would not work on the vortex sprocket so i contacted vortex they said it must be a bad chain. called ek they sent me a new chain still would not fit so i called vortex and then they told me only a few chain manufactureers fit there sprockets i wasnt told this when i bought there cool looking high dollar sprocket so i asked them to send me a return label to send them back their sprocket and they said they will not pay for shipping to return their product wich really upset me because it cost me 69.00 plus tax to buy it and 10.00 to ship it to me and now another 10.00 to ship back their sprocket now its been almost 2 months of waiting.i highly recomend ek chains they stand behind their product vortex does not the vortex picth must be off a little thats why some people go through them fast

I use the Sidewinder Ti-Moly rear sprockets and a good X-Ring chain from either D.I.D., EK, RK or Primary Drive. The Sidewinder Ti-Moly and too steel sprockets are pricey, but nearly indestructible. Yes they weigh a little more than aluminum, but I find it hard to believe most of us could tell the difference when riding. The combination of the Sidewinder sprocket and X-ring chain lasts three seasons of trail riding for me with little sign of wear. In fact, I've typically sold the bike long before the chain and sprocket need replaced.

Does anyone recommend the anodized rear sprockets? Does the anodizing wear off?

The Tag sprockets I use are hard anodized, which improves wear. Color anodizing will wear off at the teeth, but nowhere else.

Ok, so I think I messed up. I got the DID ert2 chain and i didn't realize it wasn't an O ring chain. I want to exchange it at Motosport for either the x chain or VT. Which one do you recommend and can I get a clip style master link for either of them. I would like to keep it simple, both with the master link and I don't want to have to run any spacers.

Thanks.

The DiD ER2 chain isnt a bad chain. I ran it with some sunline sprockets and it worked out really well...:bonk:

I posted awhile back on this; but I went from a DID ERT2 and Pro Taper sprocket, they were okay, but seemed to wear and stretch quick. I got a great deal via Ebay on a DID ERV3 and combined them with the TAG sprockets for my YZ450F, great combo. Wearing well and smooth power delivery. I have also had good luck with the Renthal sprockets overall (2-strokes). I am combining Renthal with a Regina ORS6 chain for my son's CRF450R

how about Sidewinder sprockets? they're website says liftetime warrenty if u buy the titanium II sprockets anyone out there have them?

Everyone has told me not to run a wide o/x ring chain because of case,frame,chain guide problems. After looking at the did vt I see they make two different models, the vt and vt2. Evidently these chains are oem on the crf250x, crf45x, wr's etc. Both have to run a press on masterlink which I do not necessarily want but the question is whats the difference between these chains? Also whats their durability like and is it worth the extra money over a did ert2?

IMO mx bikes don't need o ring...Unless you take really really good care of your chain, after a few muddy rides, or some dune riding, POOF your oring now works worse than a non o ring...Trail bikes, and street bikes, yeah it's better, because those guys aren't burrying their chain in dirt while riding...

I use DID520MX along with Ironman sprockets and feel I've found a great mix of perfomance/longevity...

I personally have three problems with the Ironman sprockets:

> The lack of a full ring center. IMO, this places too much stress on the mounting flange under some conditions.

The new ironman sprockets have a full ring center now.

...Unless you take really really good care of your chain, after a few muddy rides, or some dune riding, POOF your oring now works worse than a non o ring...
I have no such trouble with the Regina ORN6 O-ring chains I run. They last me about 1.5-2 years, and all I do is rinse them off, let them dry, and squirt some low-tack lube on them to protect them.

The thing that kills O-ring chains is not exposure to dirt, sand, or mud, it pressure washing. Pressure washers drive water under the seals, forcing out the lube. The trick is to use a chain lube like Maxima Synthetic Chain Guard that isn't sticky when dry, and washes away easily with Simple Green (or whatever) and low pressure water. If you absolutely must use high pressure water, do so only from the sides, parallel with the pins, and do so from no closer than 12-15".

And yeah, yeah..."The Ironman sprockets can destroy your hub" fable...I ask you, have you personally seen it happen? If so, don't you think the force put on it would've happened with any sprocket?...

I go with what I've seen not what I've heard...I've seen friends new aluminum sprockets look like crap after a couple rides, teeth worn or bent, new chains with all kinds of lateral movement...And my old stuff is holding up strong and looking new...

The new ironman sprockets have a full ring center now.
Yeah, that's an improvement. But looking at it, it's still not a machined ring that fully fits on the hub flange. The new design does look like it will cut down on "scrubbing" a lot, though, and should be less likely to "fold" at one mounting ear under extremes of stress.

http://www.dirttricks.com/model-48T-h-600pix.jpg

Sure gray, you just hose it off...

After every ride!

I know you've got one of those handy chain scrubbers, use simple green, maybe even brake cleaner, and have your chain sparkling before using the maxima on it...Then align your sprockets perfectly, adjust the slack "the correct way"...Then give it another spray 24 hrs before use...

LOL Yeah those guys can benefit from an o ring...

Sure gray, you just hose it off...

After every ride!

I know you've got one of those handy chain scrubbers, use simple green, maybe even brake cleaner, and have your chain sparkling before using the maxima on it...Then align your sprockets perfectly, adjust the slack "the correct way"...Then give it another spray 24 hrs before use...

LOL Yeah those guys can benefit from an o ring...

No, actually that's all I do to it. In fact, I often don't even hose it off, depending on where I ride. I would never scrub a sealed chain with anything; too much danger of damaging the seals.

As far as all the alignment and adjustment and stuff goes, that's not necessary either, at least not very often. The chain needs adjustment barely twice a year. :)

"The block in the second photo below is cut to 1.95", and just fits "

Grayracer: Do you position this block on top of the top rear chain slider fixing bolt ? Could I then rotate the wheel with the block in place (for example an allen key) stuck between the chain and sprocket to pull the chain taught but not tight and then tighten down the axle?

The block in question goes directly over the rear chain slider bolt, yes.

Once the tension is established, focus on aligning the wheel, then double check the tension and lock both adjusters. THEN tighten the axle. As you say, running an object of some sort between the chain and sprocket (a piece of wood or plastic, rawhide, old inner tube is preferable, but I use a wrench sometimes) is a good way to force the axle against the adjusters, but remove the gauge block first.

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