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Ungraceful Getoff = Twisted Fork

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I'm fortunate that my house backs up to lots of acreage, and I've cut a lot of riding trails through the trees and ravines. I got a little overconfident on my 2006 DRZ S on Friday, and took a pretty good spill at speed, and all 300 pounds of DRZ came down on my right achilles. Fortunately I had good boots on, and escaped with only a few bruises on my 52 year old carcass.

Now my fork is twisted in relation to the handlebars. I've read many of the posts from others who had the same problem, and have a couple of questions (that I should have been able to figure out the answers to):

1) are the "lower triple clamps" the clamps that are located at the top of the fork boots (just below the headlight)? If so, it sounds like I loosen the two bolts on the outside of these clamps?

2) then, loosen the axle pinch bolts, and either a) force the handlebars back in line while holding the front wheel between my legs, or :bonk: put the front wheel against a wall and pump the front end to get things straightened out. Is one of these two options - a) or :bonk: - better than the other?

Thanks in advance for the help!

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I have to realign mine after every ride...I so suck..just put on stand loosen the bolts on the triple clamp that is on the bottom as well as the axle bolt and and pinch bolts located on the clutch side of the bike..everything will move easily and you can align it... tighten the triple clamps first making sure you keep things lined up... then spin the front tire and hit the front brake a few times to stops it... tighten pinch bolts and axle bolts... all done...

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I have to realign mine after every ride...I so suck..just put on stand loosen the bolts on the triple clamp that is on the bottom as well as the axle bolt and and pinch bolts located on the clutch side of the bike..everything will move easily and you can align it... tighten the triple clamps first making sure you keep things lined up... then spin the front tire and hit the front brake a few times to stops it... tighten pinch bolts and axle bolts... all done...

After every ride? Wow! :bonk:

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ighten the triple clamps first making sure you keep things lined up... then spin the front tire and hit the front brake a few times to stops it... tighten pinch bolts and axle bolts... all done...

This is the 1st I've heard of the 'spin the wheel then hit the brake' method... I'm trying to think how that would help line things up? I've typically loosened one side of the axle pinch bolts and rolled the front wheel up against a wood block in order to compress the forks evenly, thereby straightening them a bit.

I figured using the brakes, especially since it's a single rotor, would actually encourage a little twist... I'm open to correction on this one, just curious to get it right.

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Thanks for the feedback guys.. sorry no video as I was too busy flipping/rolling through the woods.

Yokomo - I am in Shawnee - far west out by the Kansas river. Where are you?

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A really effective way to judge how well aligned your forks are is to get a piece of plate glass cut so it fits on the bare part of the fork tube. If you have an E/S it's the part that the triple clamps hold on to, for an SM, it's the part near the axle.

Put the plate glass on the tube, and lightly hold it in position, then push on one top corner, then one bottom corner. If it rocks back and forth, the fork tubes aren't parallel. Loosen the pinch bolts, hold the bars, and use a rubber mallet to tap on the bottom clamp. Test again with the plate glass, and when it sits flat, tighten everything up.

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