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DNA test kit for dogs?

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Just curious, has anyone tried any of these, with good results? There are a BUNCH of 'em, from $50-$135, and I want to get the best bang for my buck!

For my older dog, I just think it would be good to know if she's part boxer or part pit... she's got some small skin growths lately, and the vet said boxers are prone to cancer, so if she's boxer we need to watch them VERY carefully! As for the younger dog, I'd like to know if he's German Shepherd, as they are so prone to hip problems... and, of course, it'll just be cool to know!

Now I've got to go sign on to Val's new dog site, and ask there, too!

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Kris keeps telling me it's silly, but I'd really like to know what my mutts are too. Let us know what you end up doing!

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http://www.petstreetmall.com/Dog-DNA-Test/8348/3191/details.html

I ended up going with this test... Petsmart sells the Bio Pet kits for $60, and these were only $45 each, and free shipping over $50 which was nice 'cause I needed two!

There is more info here on this brand: http://www.biopetvetlab.com/about.htm

They claim to have 63 breeds ID'd, which they claim is over 93% of all breeds in mixed breeds... I've found other tests that claim to have over 100 breeds ID'd, but those were about $100, and Dr. Chad over at the dog pound site pointed out something... the $100 test wanted you to send in a pic, to put on its pretty 'certificate', but it would be awfully easy to use the pic to decide on breeds!

Also I noted that neither one claim to ID 'pit bulls', which is something I've thinking might be in my little girl... but, given that pit bulls aren't AKC that kind of makes sense. If there is a big 'unknown' in her, I can guess what it'll be, if she's not boxer!

Should be interesting, I'll keep you posted once I get the tests & results! :busted:

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Just curious, has anyone tried any of these, with good results? There are a BUNCH of 'em, from $50-$135, and I want to get the best bang for my buck!

For my older dog, I just think it would be good to know if she's part boxer or part pit... she's got some small skin growths lately, and the vet said boxers are prone to cancer, so if she's boxer we need to watch them VERY carefully! As for the younger dog, I'd like to know if he's German Shepherd, as they are so prone to hip problems... and, of course, it'll just be cool to know!

Now I've got to go sign on to Val's new dog site, and ask there, too!

L2f,

Normally hip problems are associated with purebreds. Once you dilute the gene pool with another make and model, the chances of these diminish. Not too many "Mixed Breed" dogs, that I have ever heard of come up with hip problems. Part of the problem larger breed dogs can have hip problems is, they grow too fast. Most people buy puppy food and actually feed it for a year. per the bag. I know a lot of lab people, trainers, breeders, and just owners. From the people I know they feed puppy food for only the first 6 months, then cut it in half, or out due to the high calcium in the food. They want to help slow down the bone growth rate. Another problem with larger breed dogs and their hips, is the fact people keep them over weight. Most people just seem to think that their dog is just a big dog, when in reality the dog is over weight.

Cancer is a totally different story.

Still I am curious to hear what you find out about what mix your dogs are.

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L2f,

Normally hip problems are associated with purebreds. Once you dilute the gene pool with another make and model, the chances of these diminish. Not too many "Mixed Breed" dogs, that I have ever heard of come up with hip problems. Part of the problem larger breed dogs can have hip problems is, they grow too fast. Most people buy puppy food and actually feed it for a year. per the bag. I know a lot of lab people, trainers, breeders, and just owners. From the people I know they feed puppy food for only the first 6 months, then cut it in half, or out due to the high calcium in the food. They want to help slow down the bone growth rate. Another problem with larger breed dogs and their hips, is the fact people keep them over weight. Most people just seem to think that their dog is just a big dog, when in reality the dog is over weight.

Cancer is a totally different story.

Still I am curious to hear what you find out about what mix your dogs are.

Thanks, good info there! :busted: Glad to know that about the hip issue... my mixed breed boy is only 56lbs, so he's probably not at high risk then... awesome!

But yeah, it'll still be cool knowing what he is! :moon:

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my vet said any pure bred dog that is long bodied like a shepard,rotti,greatdane,etc as well as any smaller breeds

that are long bodied are prone to hip problems.he said the best

way to avoid is to keep them lean and give them lots of exercise

for muscle tone.my shepard and dane both lived 13+ yrs and i followed

the vets advice!!

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Got my test kits today! :( I'm excited... they say give it a week for the samples to get to the lab, then 2 weeks after that, so I'm looking at 3 weeks for results.

I had to separate the two dogs for an hour with no access to mutual toys, so I'm waiting for that time to pass... in the meantime I was digging through my adoption records, getting adoption dates and birthdates for the certificates... I was getting all misty-eyed, remembering the days I brought my dogs home!! :smirk::lol::smirk::lol: Good times!

I know my boy wouldn't've been much longer for the world, he came from a very poor shelter with very limited space, and at 55# is bigger than a lot of people want to adopt...

I encourage everyone looking for a pet to ADOPT from your local shelter... a life depends on it!! :thinking:

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