Drowned Engine, Lying Bike, etc...

So today, after a really exhausting week of work while my coworkers took time off (Japan is a Christian country, no Christmas here), I motivate myself thinking "Come on ! I'll hit the road hard this weekend, :eek: looking forward to that !". I was, really.

Until I came home and found my bike lying in the middle of the street, still in its protective cover, which the wind probably pushed hard enough to make it shift over (yes, it was very windy today). :moon:

The result is my bike fell in the same exact spot than my first fall, the handlebar's clamp is now completely done for, the handlebar itself is probably bent too. Oh, and my bike completely emptied of gas as soon as I pulled it back up. There was also a very brownish/yellowish stain on the cover, but can't see from where. :mad:

It's night now, so can't clearly see the damages, but the Engine is definitely drown, can't even try to start it. :busted:

Give it to me straight guys, will my beauty ever ride the streets of Tokyo again, or was leaving it lying in the street for a whole day really, really, the worst thing that could happen ? :p

Not fair, really.

Yes, it will run again. You need do some work though. Get the spark plug out and roll it over with the starter to get the gas out of the cylinder. You then need to change the oil, since its probably also saturated with gas.

Depending on how much gas is in the oil, you might need to change it twice.

Very easy fix.. Gas and oil mix and gas residue will evaporate.

Stand up the bike, remove the spark plug SLOWLY bump over the motor.. If it has a lot in the cylinder it will come out fast, splashing everywhere. Not big issue when it's water,,, but if it's gas, that make a real mess.. So couple of tics at a time until the piston has been past TDC at least twice. drop the oil from the frame and motor, add 2 L of cheap oil, install the plug start bike as normal,,, Run it around the block just till at normal operating temp, come home and change oil again. If you use paper oil filter, replace that at this time also.

Might want to figure out a better parking system to keep the bike from blowing over.... Old spare tire on the ground you bike is tide down to?

Thanks for the help guys :moon:

But Jeez, this sounds like a lot of work indeed, especially since I never even changed my oil myself yet. I don't see myself doing precise work with the spark also... maybe if I had a garage or someplace well lit, but in the street it's gonna be tough.

I'll see if the spark dried a bit over night and take it for a full oil change, including filters. It needed it anyway.

What bothers me as well is the handlebar clamp which is broken, and I can't put a Zeta one or else the ignition won't have anywhere to be screwed to anymore...

Anyway, thanks again, I feel relieved ! :busted:

Edit: How come the gas could just pour out the bike once stood up though ? I don't really get it, it's not through the exhaust, nor the tank, nor the air box... so where ? Just curious.

Float could be hung up.

The work isn't difficult. I'd do it on the side of the road if it was necessary. What you don't want to do is try to ride it to a shop. Any fuel in the oil and it could be real trouble.

Some choices in bar clamps out there and the switch can be relocated if need be.

No reason to be intimidated. You need to pull the fuel tank off, but that is pretty simply.

I'm guessing a lot of the fuel came out of the gas cap vent and was simply in your bike cover.

First check your oil. If there is "extra" fluid in the reservoir then it's fuel and not oil; you'll have to drain and change oil.

If the level is normal, then make a hesitant attempt to start the bike - if the fuel has leaked into the cylinder enough to "hydraulic lock" the piston (fuel is liquid, and therefor incompressible, so the piston won't move up in the cylinder) then immediately release the starter button and pull your spark plug to allow the fuel out. If this has happened, you will have to drain and change the oil before you run the engine or risk major damage.

However, if the engine turns over at it's normal speed and without any unusual sounds, then you should be okay. After the engine has been cranked over for a moment stop and once again check the oil. If some has run out then the dipstick will indicate low, so just top it off, but if it reads too high then fuel has flooded the crankcase and is being pumped up into the reservoir. If so, you'll have to drain and change the oil.

However, if the oil is not contaminated with fuel, and if there is no accumulation in the cylinder, and the oil hasn't all leaked out of your engine (a lot of "ifs" there, I know) then you're probably good to go. Fix your bar clamp and have fun.

Very easy fix.. Gas and oil mix and gas residue will evaporate.

Stand up the bike, remove the spark plug SLOWLY bump over the motor.. If it has a lot in the cylinder it will come out fast, splashing everywhere. Not big issue when it's water,,, but if it's gas, that make a real mess.. So couple of tics at a time until the piston has been past TDC at least twice. drop the oil from the frame and motor, add 2 L of cheap oil, install the plug start bike as normal,,, Run it around the block just till at normal operating temp, come home and change oil again. If you use paper oil filter, replace that at this time also.

Might want to figure out a better parking system to keep the bike from blowing over.... Old spare tire on the ground you bike is tide down to?

+1 no point in risking MAJOR engine damage by trying to start a hydrolocked engine. What you need to do is very simple, just follow broncos advice and the manual , if you don't have one, get one. They can be found online for free.

note about oil change: replace the two crush washers and install according to manual(with tapered side of crush washer on the bolt, flat side on the engine/frame)

Jbw

Hydraulicing a running engine by sucking water in will certainly do damage - especially if you're revving (and who isn't when you're deep enough to suck water in), but trying to start a hydraulically locked engine won't hurt anything except the starter - and only then if you're not smart enough to let go of the button before you melt the windings.

The starter button is just another tool to help diagnose the problem.

You make a good point... when he said he can't even try to start it, I assumed he meant that it wouldn't turn over when he hit the starter button.

Theoritically, a very small amount of gas should have been able to make it into the motor, if your fuel petcock is working properly. [Assuming the Japanese spec bikes also have a vacuum operated petcock.]

OT for sure, but Regalman, I just noticed your signature. I tell my wife that her KLX250 won't run right until it ripens and turns yellow.

OP is very inexperienced. Best for him to take it to a dealer or other place qualified to work on it. As for the gas pouring out, he says he does not know where it came from. We should not assume anything. Perhaps the fuel tap is broken. He needs to take it to a qualified person.

And, yes to ease your mind, it will run again.

Hydraulicing a running engine by sucking water in will certainly do damage - especially if you're revving (and who isn't when you're deep enough to suck water in), but trying to start a hydraulically locked engine won't hurt anything except the starter - and only then if you're not smart enough to let go of the button before you melt the windings.

The starter button is just another tool to help diagnose the problem.

In response to the fact the the Mikuni carb has no overflow=> can easily hydrolock from a leaky petcock/float valve

Eddie Sisneros:

yet again,the EPA helping you out.wouldnt want that gas on the ground would you?much better to hydrolock your motor and risk motor damage.

From this thread

I only was repeating what other respected members have said but maybe Eddie was not referring to the starter causing the damage but something else. I personally have no first hand knowledge of motor damage from the starter.

Jbw

I wouldn't challenge Eddie's opinion in this regard either, but damage from hydraulic lock occurs from the sudden stoppage of the piston against the incompressible fluid, with all the inertia of the flywheel, drivetrain, etc suddenly brought to a stop. Typically, the conrod is what gives.

If fuel accumulates in small amounts (too small to lock the engine before TDC) on top of the piston, a more subtle form of damage occurs to the cylinder walls. When the liquid fuel displaces the oil layer that normally coats the cylinder the cross-hatch hone marks (or the "cracked" pattern in nikaseal barrels) is scrubbed off. Without the oil to seal and lubricate the piston rings wear occurs very quickly, compression and power are lost, and oil consumption increases. In diesel engines this can occur if an engine idles for extended periods in extremely cold weather. In our motorcycles, this might happen if the float valve stuck open and flooded the intake.

Either way, the starter doesn't develop enough force to bend the conrod, but a start with a badly flooded engine could cause wear problems.

Danger :busted: I have seen motors filled with gas and when you remove the spark plug and crank the engine over a spark could ignite the gas and your DRZ will be on fire. Put the bike in gear with the ignition off and roll the bike forward to expel any gas from the cylinder

Thank you again guys ! Sorry for the late reply, GMT +9 here... :p

Ok, so yes, it was with the starter that the bike couldn't start, I don't have any kicker installed on it.

I did make it roll a few meters while moving it from this "full of gas" spot, and before reading your replies this morning. Using the starter, the engine actually started... :mad: I let it go at low rpm for about 2 mn, just to get it warmed up, so I could see the correct oil level, so I thought.

Stopped the engine, checked the oil, and well, it looks fine, and so does the level, BUT, it smells very strongly gas... can't tell if it always smelled like that or not, but it does smell very strongly gas. :moon:

Noise wise, the engine seemed a little bit more noisy than usual, but I have a bad sound memory. My Yosh pipe is usually the noisiest but I could hear the engine rotations clearly here.

So, I'm gonna go buy some cheap oil, and do as the advised, do my first oil change, like a big boy :busted:

Once it's done, I'll take it to my bike shop and ask him to do a proper one with filter change too. And a new clamp... mine is completely broken in the middle now (still holds in the 2 main spots, but broken in half else).

My only hope is that having the engine run for 2 mn with gas in the oil didn't damage too much the bike... :eek:

Oh, and additionally, even though it was night when I got home yesterday, the gas DEFINITELY poured out of the bike when I pulled it back up, it wasn't in the cover which I had removed on one side before.

The gas tank cap is factory, and looks fine, but that's odd... still wonder. Vent cap you said ? Where's that supposed to be ?

Ycare - Please remember most of the advise you get is from the US. Domestic model DRZ's may be different in certain areas that we don't know about.

Your gas tank is vented. Maybe in the cap? Maybe else where?

US bikes have a vacuum operated fuel shut off. I don't know if you do. Does your fuel valve have ON, RES, PRI or ON, RES, OFF? If there is an OFF position, was it OFF? Your carb may or may not have a high fuel level drain. Even if there is a drain it may not work with the bike on it's side.

Short run time with fuel contaminated oil will not damage it.

Thank you Noble for the precised feedback.

I have a RES, PRI and ON switch. Since I asked my bike shop to change the injection, he advised to leave it on PRI though I don't know what's the difference with "ON". RES is pretty clear to me of course.

Mind to explain what you think happened since it was indeed on the PRI (OFF ?) switch ?

Thank you ! :busted:

That is the problem. The "PRI" position is "prime". It is full on hope the needle in the carb works or there is going to be a mess not off position. Your mechanic gave you some bum information. When in the "ON" or "RES" positions the fuel is shut off when the engine is shut off. It works via vacuum.

You do have a vacuum operated petcock. Both ON and RES are OFF when the motor is not running. PRI (prime) bypasses the off function running or not. The petcock should never be left in the PRI position. PRI is only for short term use to get fuel into a dry carb after long periods if non use.

You are going to have to explain about the "change of injection". I do not know what your mean by that.

If the fuel system was modified so there is no vacuum source to operate the vacuum petcock, then you have to use PRI as a manual ON for the motor to run. BUT you also have to manualy move the lever to ON or RES everytime the bike is parked. (remember both ON and RES are OFF when there is no vacuum to open the valve)

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