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The Whoops

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Ok so I ride pretty fast down the whoops today i was doin around 50 through the woops in the woods and i got my back end like swaying back and forth and i ate it hard ambulance and all!! my question is how can i keep from gettin out of shape and how to correcct it when i do get out of shape

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i usually grip tighter with my legs, stick my ass back a little more and give it a bit more gas. a prayer or two also helps

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haha yeah i usually try to do all those things too but this time was different i had never gone this fast over em

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You were doing 50 through the whoops? you my friend are faster than chad reed, james stewart and all the pros. Why aren't you racing pro!?

Come on, dont be stupid. if you were doing 50mph through the whoops you'd be the faster rider to ever go through whoops.

All i can say is lean as far back as possible (PUT ABSOLUTELY NO WEIGHT ON YOUR FRONT WHEEL) and grip as hard as possible with your knees.

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umm dude youve never seen me ride and 4th gear pinned on revlimiter is damn near 50

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You were doing 50 through the whoops? you my friend are faster than chad reed, james stewart and all the pros. Why aren't you racing pro!?

Come on, dont be stupid. if you were doing 50mph through the whoops you'd be the faster rider to ever go through whoops.

50 mph thru whoops isn't at all unheard of. We're not talking MX track whoops, trail whoops - very easy to reach high speed.

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I would slow down, but I am allergic to ambulances!

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50 mph thru whoops isn't at all unheard of. We're not talking MX track whoops, trail whoops - very easy to reach high speed.

Ahh right. Then shouldnt this be in the off-road section?

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50 mph thru whoops isn't at all unheard of. We're not talking MX track whoops, trail whoops - very easy to reach high speed.

very good point! the whoops weren't 2 and a half feet deep maybe a foot or so?? but yeah im really trying to learn on the whoops in the woods so i can be fast on the whoops at the track

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very good point! the whoops weren't 2 and a half feet deep maybe a foot or so?? but yeah im really trying to learn on the whoops in the woods so i can be fast on the whoops at the track

Totally different. Real whoops, 3-4 ft tall and 9 feet apart, you ride a gear high (3rd or 4th) and slightly touch your front wheel then back wheel on each one to "skim" them. Rollers, I.E. those that are further apart and round, not peaked, you either jump through or manual through with your back wheel and throttle control.

Trail whoops are little rollers usually and to not swap you can grip the bike harder with your knees, lean back, or slightly touch the rear brake to keep the rear wheel planted.

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Trail whoops are little rollers usually...

Key word: "usually". There's a set near me that's a bit less than a mile long that are easily 24" deep & 9'-10' peak-peak in lots of places. I've run them in 5th before (on my 03 CRF450R) the whole way... one of the ways I worked on getting better in the whoops. I'm not sure how this set was formed, they are on what looks like may have been where train tracks were run, but that's 100% pure speculation!

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very good point! the whoops weren't 2 and a half feet deep maybe a foot or so?? but yeah im really trying to learn on the whoops in the woods so i can be fast on the whoops at the track

How tighly spaced?

If tight, go thru them slow and get comfortable w/ the bike moving a lot. Some of that practice will transfer to the track - even if they're little stutter bumps (little bity cute whoops). Being able to hammer bumps or chop only improves and builds skill IMO. They'll apply to braking bumps to a certain extent.

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First and foremost, make damn sure your suspension settings are proper for your weight and type of riding you do. Your enjoyment of the riding experience will sooo greatly be enhanced when you have a knowledgable suspension tuner guy go thru your setup.

If your back end was swapping all super-bad and stuff, enough to scare you... My assumption would be that for that particular section, and for your current suspension settings... the easiest solution would be to ease back on throttle ever so gradually until the swapping comes back in line. Do not rapidly reduce throttle... it's the only thing keeping your bike from totally pitching you off in those situations.

Also... it's almost always better to be pulling in a higher gear than over-revved in the next gear down. Whenever you're in one of those situations where you're very over-revved your suspension can't do it's job the way it was meant and designed to. Just like when you're climbing a rocky uphill... if your rear-end is all wound-up you'll be "sprionging" over every rock... whereas if you slipped the clutch just a hair the whole way up, you'll notice how your (properly setup) rear-end just gobbles 'em up rather smoothly.

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