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Getting from braking to accelerating...

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I was wondering if you guys could explain how you have your throtle hand positioned when you make the transition. For me to get from braking to wide open it seems as if I need an accesive amont of overgrip, I'm curious to see how some of you guys do it (Pictures may help my quest for knowledge haha). Thanks a lot guys! :busted:

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Cornering is an art form. To get really good at it you have to have a lot of talent, know all the techniques inside and out and then practice it frequently in many ways over a long period of time.

There’s much more to cornering than just leaning over and going through the turn. There are things like the angle of the corners, whether they’re banked or off-camber, sharp or sweeping, and the conditions of the track. Then there are the techniques of cornering between the rider and motorcycle. There are even techniques that affect the handling of the motorcycle in the corner. These techniques make the motorcycle either hold the track or brake loose and pivot, slide through the corner.

In order to do a corner fast you need to carry as much speed as possible and as long as possible into the corner, slow yourself down just enough to still have control at the exit dex, (the exit dex is where you go from braking to accelerating) and then get on the gas as soon and as hard as possible. In order to carry a lot of speed into the corners, you need to have a fast and late approach dex (the approach dex is where you go from accelerating to braking). With this in mind, we can understand that a very important part of cornering is braking. To be good at cornering, you have to be good at braking.

Of course, all through the corner, you have to maintain complete relaxed control. Tightness and mistakes will only make you tired and slow you down, if not make you crash. Remember, you can only try as hard, and go as fast, as you can do the basic techniques correctly and maintain relaxed control. So, if you’re tight or making mistakes, you will benefit by slowing down, which in turn will allow you to learn how to go faster.

In others words, it takes much more finesse than just charging into the turns at full speed and hoping you’ll be able to make it when you get in there. You have to constantly anticipate exactly what is going to happen just before it happens. You have to know the exact line that you want to be on. That line should take you to the best possible traction for the exit dex. You see, it’s very important to know exactly where your front tire is going, so you can find the best traction at the most critical part of the turn. This is where you’re going to be turning the most, at the exit dex. Again, make sure your front tire is going exactly where you want it to go. If you’re doing the techniques correctly, the back tire will also go exactly where you want it to go. For much more in-depth cornering info check out my DVD #7 (All about Cornering). For video downloads www.mxraceschool.com for my main site and to order online www.gsmxs.com :busted:

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I have actually downloaded several of your videos and own a few of your dvd's. I understand the basic techniques of cornering but my struggle is my hand position in going from braking to accelerating (Wide Open) and still having my elbows up. I know to have a good amount of overgrip but to make the transition I feel like I have to overgrip too much to the point where my wrist is bent too far forward and will sacrifice control. I'm searching for a way to reduce the travel distance in the throttle or if there is a better hand positioning to do so.

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maybe moving your brake lever up slightly will help since you wont have to twist your wrist as forward.

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My levers are pretty high, I'm not worried about the lever I'm worried about going directly from braking to accelerating and being able to have my hand in the right position at wide open to have my elbows up

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If you look at many pro riders, their inside elbow (relative to the corner) is parallel or pointed down to the corner. This offers an improved lean angle and if the corner is a right hander, the ability to have the wrist cocked forward to be ready to twist the throttle. On the contrary, a left hander, the outside elbow is tilted up to the sky, with the wrist again cocked forward (think of your knuckles rotated very far forward on the grip). Your grip on the throttle also comes into play. You should be holding on to it like you do when you twist a door knob.

Lastly, when coming into a corner, I see way too many riders come into the corner to close to the apex, that is they do not make a sweeping apex (outside to inside) and they sit down to early. If you can make a wide arc, and remain standing until you hit the apex of the corner, then sit down and put your leg up, your wrist and hand should naturally just rotate down to twist the throttle (if you had your elbows up coming into the corner). Just my .02.

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If you look at many pro riders, their inside elbow (relative to the corner) is parallel or pointed down to the corner. This offers an improved lean angle and if the corner is a right hander, the ability to have the wrist cocked forward to be ready to twist the throttle. On the contrary, a left hander, the outside elbow is tilted up to the sky, with the wrist again cocked forward (think of your knuckles rotated very far forward on the grip). Your grip on the throttle also comes into play. You should be holding on to it like you do when you twist a door knob.

Lastly, when coming into a corner, I see way too many riders come into the corner to close to the apex, that is they do not make a sweeping apex (outside to inside) and they sit down to early. If you can make a wide arc, and remain standing until you hit the apex of the corner, then sit down and put your leg up, your wrist and hand should naturally just rotate down to twist the throttle (if you had your elbows up coming into the corner). Just my .02.

That makes the most sense to me, thanks a lot for your help!

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I run my brake lever really low - this allows me to reach the brake when I am standing and slowing down. I automatically have a big overgrip if I don't let go. When the throttle is closed, my wrists are straight, elbows way up, etc. And I don't need to regrip when I come out of the corner.

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I run my brake lever really low - this allows me to reach the brake when I am standing and slowing down. I automatically have a big overgrip if I don't let go. When the throttle is closed, my wrists are straight, elbows way up, etc. And I don't need to regrip when I come out of the corner.

I tried that and it worked well but I also felt unstable when going through braking bumps.

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I run my brake lever really low - this allows me to reach the brake when I am standing and slowing down. I automatically have a big overgrip if I don't let go. When the throttle is closed, my wrists are straight, elbows way up, etc. And I don't need to regrip when I come out of the corner.

Many trail riders run levers low, but for motocross follow the advice of mostly every pro or trainer and move them up. We know not many people ride like RC, however is a great example of lever position and braking body position, he runs is bars swept back, and levers high. he has his but on the rear fender when braking to maintain control and brake harder. you can't do that with your levers low. This also helps with the beginning of this thread, as you transition for brakes to power, and naturally puts you in the right spot to turn the throttle.

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Many trail riders run levers low, but for motocross follow the advice of mostly every pro or trainer and move them up. We know not many people ride like RC, however is a great example of lever position and braking body position, he runs is bars swept back, and levers high. he has his but on the rear fender when braking to maintain control and brake harder. you can't do that with your levers low. This also helps with the beginning of this thread, as you transition for brakes to power, and naturally puts you in the right spot to turn the throttle.

maybe if I run my levers a little higher it will help with my dilemma, thanks so much for the advice!

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If you are looking at the bike from the side, regardless of whether your bars are swept back or forward you should try and get used to the top of you brake and cluth lever being the same height from the ground as the top of your grip.

Then when you go doing 40min moto's you should have a blister half way between the where your thumb joins your hand and your index finger leeves it!

If you get a blister there you know that your bars, levers and body position are just about spot on! (IMO)

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If you are looking at the bike from the side, regardless of whether your bars are swept back or forward you should try and get used to the top of you brake and cluth lever being the same height from the ground as the top of your grip.

Then when you go doing 40min moto's you should have a blister half way between the where your thumb joins your hand and your index finger leeves it!

If you get a blister there you know that your bars, levers and body position are just about spot on! (IMO)

I think that might be a little too high for me, but hey it's worth the try!

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Bars swept back, bars forward, leverslow or levers high......They don't really matter. Bar and lever position is a personal setting and has no effect on cornering. The proper positioning of your body and proper technique are what really matters. If you have the cornering video watch it and follow it to the T. Then go out and practice the technique on one turn only. once you master that turn move on to the next one. Be ready to spend hours on 1 turn. Once you get the technique down the turns go faster.

Remember races are won in the corners and on the starts. Good Luck!

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Many trail riders run levers low, but for motocross follow the advice of mostly every pro or trainer and move them up. We know not many people ride like RC, however is a great example of lever position and braking body position, he runs is bars swept back, and levers high. he has his but on the rear fender when braking to maintain control and brake harder. you can't do that with your levers low. This also helps with the beginning of this thread, as you transition for brakes to power, and naturally puts you in the right spot to turn the throttle.

Good point, hadn't thought of that. Most riders can't be over the rear fender and still reach the brake if it's really low. I'm an anomaly - 6'6" and have no trouble reaching the front brake while standing behind the bike.

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I was wondering if you guys could explain how you have your throtle hand positioned when you make the transition. For me to get from braking to wide open it seems as if I need an accesive amont of overgrip, I'm curious to see how some of you guys do it (Pictures may help my quest for knowledge haha). Thanks a lot guys! :smirk:

You have to do a little over grip at the end of you're braking in order to maintain the proper upper body position for accelerating.

Learn more about it at; www.gsmxs.com :thinking:

Good luck,

Gary Semics

www.gsmxs.com

www.mxraceschool.com

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At the last second after the braking bumps (still standing) pull yourself over the bars and regrip the throttle with your elbows high. The corner entry will probably approach fast so at the right moment, drop yourself rearward into the attach position (from the forward standing position) while sticking your leg out. If you place your re-grip correctly just the act of sitting (and the subsequent lowering of your elbows) with naturally open the throttle to the degree based on the re-grip. It feels pretty cool when done this way. Works real well in sandy corners when getting on the gas early is so important.

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I just want to say I thanks to everyone for all the advice, you have all been really helpful and I also apologize for my lack of participation recently, I've been very occupied with work and such, once again thanks everyone!

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