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Upgrade 08 TE-510 or buy new 08 or 09 KLR 650

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I have a new 2008 TE-510 but want to do some serious long distance off-road dual sporting adventures. This will require a much larger fuel tank, hard side bags, trunk bag, grip heaters, etc. Should I spend the money and upgrade the TE-510 (and lose its really excellent technical off-road capabilities) or buy a second bike like a KLR 650 and keep the TE-510 in stock form as an offroad "playbike" and use the KLR for the really long (but less technical) off-road tours?

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I would get a TE 610 before I got a KLR 650, but hey it's a Husky forum. I'm not sure the TE 510 would fit the bill for a serious long distance solution, but I'm sure there are many here that would have a ton of great suggestions on how to make it work. Honestly, a 3.1 gallon IMS tank would be a joke for serious mileage and that's your only option besides carrying the rest. Now that I think about it. I'm not sure that a TE 610 has a large tank option either. Anyway, I would never own a 432 pound dirt bike...ever!

Define "serious long distance off-road dual sporting adventures."

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VS

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Bend Euro Motor's bike

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I plan on doing some long rides from Texas through Mexico and Central/Southamerica which will involve some camping. Also want to do a trip to Alaska and some self-contained Multi State tours on forest/logging roads bewteen Colorado, Utah, etc. I love my Husky for really rough off-road riding but don't want to add so much stuff to it to make it long-distance and self-contained oriented that I have to spend hours modifying it between technical fun rides and long distance trips.

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A german company made rally versions of the TE. You can mail them here:info@offroad-schmiede.de They made some really big tanks for the TE.

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If you are considering the KLR,I think pre 08 is the way to go. I have one and a te610 and 950 Adv. They all have their place. If I go for long rides like you suggest the KLR would be my ride. If going two up the 950 would be a better choice. The KLR fuel range and simplicity are its strong assets.

For tight single track I have a wr250

Keep the 510 and get a good used KLR that has been farkled for your needs. That is my suggestion. SP

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I have a new 2008 TE-510 but want to do some serious long distance off-road dual sporting adventures. This will require a much larger fuel tank, hard side bags, trunk bag, grip heaters, etc. Should I spend the money and upgrade the TE-510 (and lose its really excellent technical off-road capabilities) or buy a second bike like a KLR 650 and keep the TE-510 in stock form as an offroad "playbike" and use the KLR for the really long (but less technical) off-road tours?

Hey Bpayne -

It totally depends on what you mean by "long distance". If you mean USA to Patagonia type, then a bigger bike like the KLR or KTM would probably be more enjoyable.

If you mean long distance as in 1500 miles or so in the desert southwest USA, then I believe the TE 510 can do it without extensive modifications. Get the large tank, yes, but skip the grip heaters and DEFINITELY skip the hard bags. Hard bags are a broken leg waiting to happen on an off-road bike, if you happen to get your leg caught between your hard bag and a rock.

Here is a long off-road trip on my TE510 from last winter - http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=366541&highlight=grand+canyon+off-road

My buddies rode a KLR and a DRZ. All three bikes did well on the trip, though mine needed the most maintenance. About 1100 miles of off-road plus about 400 of pavement.

Good luck with your choice!

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Bpayne

The decision to buy a new bike and ask what people think of brand X or brand Y is tough. People are going to answer based on there own riding style and type of terrain.

I have had many dirt bikes over the years but not many street/dirt bikes.

I did buy a 07 KLR for a long trip to Alaska that didn't happen, so I tried to ride it on road and off road. I found that even with suspension mods the KLR wasn't a dirt bike but did pretty well on road. If you keep the off road part of you ride to fire roads and easy dirt trails it will wrok for you. Lot's of fuel and the seat isn't bad. I found myself trying to ride to much dirt with the KLR and sold it and bought a 2008 TE 610. The problems with the 610 are fuel quantity (3.2 gal) and the seat. The problem with the seat can be cured, not sure what can be done to increase the fuel capacity (FI pump in tank). But the enjoyment level with the 610 is miles above the KLR. If you could keep your ride section between fuel stops under 120 miles and replace the seat on the 610 you will enjoy the bike.

I have ridden the 610 on a number of two day dual sport rides and the only problem I have had is the seat, and that's when you have long section of paved roads. Other than that, the bike is a kick.

32

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I did 1200 miles through Alaska on a '04 KLR. The bike is bullet proof and great for pavement and hard pack. When the mud gets deep it's weight shows itself. It is certainly capable but it definitely leans toward street.

KLR= more comfortable, better on long road days

TE= better at everything off road

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skip the grip heaters

Why would you suggest skipping the grip heaters? They are helpful, unobtrusive, economical, and use very little electrical current especially if hooked into the AC circuit.

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If you have the power, Gerbings is the sh@t for heat. A pair of gloves and heat troller use near no power, add the jacket liner, pants, etc as you need. Grip warmers are good but not near as versatile & conservative in power use, plus can go to another bike in a snap.

If I HAD to get another KLR, (it would be a fight to avoid it on my part!), I'd buy older & as low mile as possible. It ain't much of a streetbike, less of an off-roader in my eye. (yes, I had one). Slow, loose & ill braking. What can you say. They are cheeeeeeeeeap. So is just about every used bike at the moment.

The right tool, a KTM SE950. Same weight as a KLR, far better in any enviornment, tar to sand. Caveat, $$$. I'd buy a lightly used DRZ in a pinch, gear it for the trip & sell it when done.

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Why would you suggest skipping the grip heaters? They are helpful, unobtrusive, economical, and use very little electrical current especially if hooked into the AC circuit.

Hey Chas -

I suggested this because he indicated long distance off-road. Take this with a grain of salt as I have never had the heaters (though I have coveted them!), but when you are miles from anywhere, the less to go wrong, the better.

For lots of road riding, I think they would be great, just not on a bike like the 510 being ridden on extensive off-road trips.

Cheers! BP

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Certainly the issue of cost may be important here :busted:

2006 TE610 - about $4500-6000 depending on miles/shape

2006 KLR650 - about $3500-5000 depending on miles/shape

So, if it were me, I'd pick the TE610 hands down! But, the big issue is FINDING A GOOD ONE USED!!!

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Brian, you would really love grip heaters up in BC. They are cheap and easy to install. If they for some reason malfunctioned out in the middle of nowhere, the operation of the bike would not otherwise be affected in any way.

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Brian, read your trip report on the link posted..It inspired me to plan a trip this summer:thumbsup:

Bev

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If you are considering the KLR,I think pre 08 is the way to go. I have one and a te610 and 950 Adv. They all have their place. If I go for long rides like you suggest the KLR would be my ride. If going two up the 950 would be a better choice. The KLR fuel range and simplicity are its strong assets.

For tight single track I have a wr250

Keep the 510 and get a good used KLR that has been farkled for your needs. That is my suggestion. SP

Thanks for all the input. I'm currently bidding on both a fully loaded very low mileage 2008 KLR-650 and 2008 KTM 990 Adventure with lots of add ons. I sure hope I don't win both!!! My garage is full already. I'll keep my TE-510 as is for the fun stuff.

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I have a new 2008 TE-510 but want to do some serious long distance off-road dual sporting adventures. This will require a much larger fuel tank, hard side bags, trunk bag, grip heaters, etc. Should I spend the money and upgrade the TE-510 (and lose its really excellent technical off-road capabilities) or buy a second bike like a KLR 650 and keep the TE-510 in stock form as an offroad "playbike" and use the KLR for the really long (but less technical) off-road tours?

After reading all the replies here, I had to return to your orginal question. "Serious long distance off-road dual sporting adventures" is what you are asking about. Larger fuel tank, hard side bags, trunk bag, grip heaters, etc..

The TE 610 is a great bike for this, but the newer FI models dont have large tank options I think. Plus where will you mount the trunk bag? I was thinking the BMW 650s, but not sure how serious your plans are for off road, dual sport adventures either. My idea of a serious off road dual sport adventure would include connecting sections of road way to connect the dirt sections. But most the dirt sections would be roads and trails where 45 mph would be speeding. Like the trail that takes you from the Mexican border to the Canadian border that guys ride each year.

So it really depends what you will be traveling down road or trail wise?

The TE 610, BMW 650, KTM 690, all good serious dirt adventure bikes. The KLR 650 would be my choice if this trip were more road than trail, with all the options you are looking to add on, but that isn't what you have stated here.

Good luck with your choice.

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After reading all the replies here, I had to return to your orginal question. "Serious long distance off-road dual sporting adventures" is what you are asking about. Larger fuel tank, hard side bags, trunk bag, grip heaters, etc..

The TE 610 is a great bike for this, but the newer FI models dont have large tank options I think. Plus where will you mount the trunk bag? I was thinking the BMW 650s, but not sure how serious your plans are for off road, dual sport adventures either. My idea of a serious off road dual sport adventure would include connecting sections of road way to connect the dirt sections. But most the dirt sections would be roads and trails where 45 mph would be speeding. Like the trail that takes you from the Mexican border to the Canadian border that guys ride each year.

So it really depends what you will be traveling down road or trail wise?

The TE 610, BMW 650, KTM 690, all good serious dirt adventure bikes. The KLR 650 would be my choice if this trip were more road than trail, with all the options you are looking to add on, but that isn't what you have stated here.

Good luck with your choice.

Thanks again for all the feedback. I've end up winning on E-Bay a slightly used 2008 KLR-650 with bags, trunk, aluminum skid plate, crash bars, HID lights, GPS, etc. I was outbid for the 2008 KTM 990 I was looking at. I just couldn't find a good used TE-610 and of course the lack of a big fuel tank kept me looking elsewhere. MY 2008 TE-510 will remain my weekend "dirtbike/playbike" of choice while I'll use the KLR when I need to hit the paved/dirt roads for a week or more.

Again thanks for all your recommendations.

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