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2008 OGM Sx160 Pro 1st impressions review

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Since I've never read an unbiased review of the OGM mid sized bikes, I thought that I would give it a whirl since I now own one.

This is my first Pit Bike to own. I have no ties with anyone here on TT, or any dealer for that matter. You are reading an unbiased, non brand loyal report. Period.

After many hours of hashing out my options, I decided to give up my big bike and go for something smaller to ride with my family. Especially riding with my 10 yr old son. I read all that I could find on various brands and sizes. Throwing all biased opinions and reviews aside, I narrowed the field down to the OGM Sx160 Pro, Pitster Pro X4, or SSR Sr150R. We all know (or you should by now) that they are basically the same bike with subtle variances between brands. With that said, when T-bolt anted up with the blow-out price of $1,500 shipped on the OGM Sx160 Pro I couldn't resist, so I ran the plastic and patiently waited.

To my surprise it arrived early enough to pass off as a Christmas gift from my wife. Isn't she sweet? :smirk: I inspected the crate and was happy to see that it, nor the bike had endured any damage from break site to break site in the 2,000 mile trip across the United States. Sigh....... I was excited and ready to get this thing together.

Pre-ride Ritual.

I started the pre-ride maintenance rituals the day after Christmas. Tearing it down almost to the frame. Loctite'n every nut and bolt, adjusting the valves, setting up the suspension, etc....etc. Since it was nasty outside and my shop isn't heated, all of this took place inside my house, in the dining room. :thinking: Hey, it was clean and new. Nothing to worry about is what I told my wife as she gave me the 'your are an idiot' look and advised me that I had better not get anything on her floor. Later in the day we took it back out to my shop for an oil change, air filter oiling, and the first heat cycle. It was a bench to get started and still is after about an hour of ride time and another valve check. After two more heats and a couple easy rides, we change the oil again. The oil still looked new and the magnetic drain bolt had very little evidence of metallic material.

Cosmetics & Fitment.

Everything fit well. The plastic and rear fender brace fit perfectly with no trimming or straining to fit. The graphics are thick and look to be of very good quality. They were stuck well too with no pealing. The overall appearance of the bike is very Japanese-ish. In other words, it's a great looking bike. The anodized parts look good and it doesn't have an overabundance of 'bling' that can cause a pit bike to look extremely cheap (IMO). Once stripped down, the frame was kinda weird looking. Now I know why it is recommended to Loctite all nuts and bolts. Apparently the the Chinese tools of trade aren't as precise as the Japs. Some of the threads on the nuts & bolts are loose fitting. The tolerances aren't as tight, so the Loctite is needed to prevent the loosening of nuts from vibration. So far no leaks anywhere either.

Carb & starting procedure.

Once I got the bike started, I was impressed with the angry growl coming from the exhaust pipe. This thing sounds very much like the Honda CRF150-R. Why in the world anyone would spend $ on a different pipe is beyond me. I was grinning from ear to ear. Choking the carb = a fouled plug. There is a niche to starting up the engine. Turn the idle up about 1 - 1.5 full rounds and crank the bike with no throttle and NO choke. Then, as the bike warms, turn the idle screw back out to an acceptable idle. I've had to do this every time I started the bike from a dead cold engine. I left the needle clip in the original position, which was 2nd from the top. It ran the best and responded the quickest there. Unless the stock carb starts to give me unacceptable problems, I will stick with the Mikuni 'clone' carb. By the way, if anyone tells you that ANY of these mid-sized China bike comes with a Genuine Mikuni carb, laugh at them. It's a lie.

Engine.

I was surprised and impressed with the 160cc engine. It has plenty of torque and power to haul my 185 pound butt around at a very quick pace, and it revs up much quicker than expected. The response to twists of the throttle was immediate. I never dreamed that the engine would respond that quickly to throttle. I would have bet that with the flick of my wrist that the engine would die, but that was not the case. I'm gonna have fun on this little gem. :smirk:

Suspension.

At first I was greatly disappointed in the rear suspension. It was extremely harsh. Actually, it was rock hard. I had almost decided that that the rear shock was defective. It would only compress about an inch and it wouldn't return with rebound. After tweaking it a little I discovered that the shock rebound was at its slowest setting. This was preventing the shock from compressing and rebounding. After setting the rebound to the middle position, the shock was working great. I ended up setting the rebound at 6 clicks out from the fastest setting, and the compression set to 3 clicks from the softest setting. As for the forks, they are very smooth and work much better than expected. I set them to 6 clicks from the fastest rebound and 6 clicks from the softest compression. For trail riding I will probably experiment more with both ends for a softer ride. All in all the suspension is great and is more than adequate.

Brakes.

Both ends seem to work well. Neither lock up unexpectedly and both feel secure. They stop the bike as good as any bike I've owned at trail pace. I can't offer a detailed report on them yet as I haven't had time to really test them under harsh, race pace conditions with hard braking. I haven't ridden the bike that hard - yet.

Geometry.

Wow, these little bikes can get sketchy at speed! With all that power packed into a short frame, the front end can get light real quick in bumpy terrain. Especially if you have your weight shifted to the rear a little. I bolted the forks about 3/8 inch above the top clamp. The bike is lightweight too. Almost too flickable. More seat-time will cure most of that though. I am 5' 10 and fit fine on the bike - not cramped at all. I do feel that I may have a hard time shifting gears with my full size MX boots on, but have not tried it yet.

I don't have any time on an MX track or long, challenging trails yet. I will be back with another report (part 2) as soon as I can put more ride time in on tracks & trails.

So how do I like the bike?

I am thoroughly impressed so far and I hope that this report will help other potential buyers in making a decision based on facts and not hype or rumor.

More input to come ............................

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For someone looking at pitbikes for the first time, this is exactly the kind of info I'm looking for. Thanks for a great initial write up!

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I am glad to have helped.

As a side note, I have been riding 250cc - 520cc modern four stroke race bikes for the last 8 yrs. It was time to settle down a little and I think/hope this little bike may be the answer. I am 100% sure that I will have more involved fun with my family on the bike.

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is there any diffrence from the x4???
This looks more like an X4R, based on the components, no?

same bike

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I'll be watching closely and meticulously maintaining the bike.

I should have my hour meter installed this week. :thinking:

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Well the purists will disagree, but I have one and it is very, very, very close to the same bike.

I love mine and thought I got a great price at $300 more than that. What a great deal you guys are getting. Hope mine survives my divorce now....:thinking:

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I am glad to have helped.

As a side note, I have been riding 250cc - 520cc modern four stroke race bikes for the last 8 yrs. It was time to settle down a little and I think/hope this little bike may be the answer. I am 100% sure that I will have more involved fun with my family on the bike.

That is where I'm at also. My son is on a crf50 and pit bikes look like too much fun and they're less money. I live on 5 acres and have enough room to build a nice pit bike track.

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That is where I'm at also. My son is on a crf50 and pit bikes look like too much fun and they're less money. I live on 5 acres and have enough room to build a nice pit bike track.

im in the same boat. just got a house with land. will be building a test track soon. can't wait.

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Does OGM build there own engines? If not, whose is it?
there made by a factory refferred to as YX in china. there the same engine pitster,motovert,ssr etc use.

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there made by a factory refferred to as YX in china. there the same engine pitster,motovert,ssr etc use.

So they are different than a gpx 160 or a lifan?

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So they are different than a gpx 160 or a lifan?

only difference between the Yx's are that the companys personal logo is placed on the ignition and clutch covers

and some come with IRK, ORK or standard flywheel ignitions

hold out for the New Yx 160cc Motors that will be availible shortly

Thicker cases

improved berings

6 Disc clutch w/improved clutch basket

upgraded kickstarter parts

best base for mild to wild builds

LIFAN, ZHONGSHEN, JIALING, LONCIN and DUCAR are all different Motor Manufactors in China

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