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Puller for Swingarm Bolt

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After trying to pound out my swingarm bolt with a dowel, I ended up with this and the bolt didn't even budge.

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There's got to be a better way. Make a puller for that stubborn swingarm pivot bolt!

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Make sure what's left of the washers is smaller than the swingarm bolt.

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--- 01-24-2009 Edit ---

At first I tightened the nut to the point where I thought the rod would almost bend or break ... and the swingarm bolt still didn't budge. (Those all-thread rods are made of soft steel.) Then I gave the other end of the rod about a dozen LIGHT taps with a hammer and I was able to tighten the nut about another 1/8 of a turn. Some more light taps and I was able to tighten the nut another 1/4 of a turn. After tapping and tightening ... and tapping and tightening for 2 or 3 complete turns, I was able to turn the nut without tapping the other end of the rod anymore.

The night before, I did squirt some WD40 on both ends of the swingarm bolt and into the spaces between the engine case and the swingarm. When the bolt finally came out, it was covered with WD40 so that must have helped to pull it out after it broke loose.

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--- 1-24-2009 edit ---

I bought this bike new 18 months ago and it hasn't seen a whole lot of water. I guess this goes to show that one of the first things you should do when you buy a DRZ is to grease the swingarm pivot bolt.

---------------------- 01-25-2009 edit -------------------------------

Somewhere in the write up I said:

After trying unsuccessfully to use a larger size, I ended up using a 5/16" rod.

Well, I said that to simplify the write up.

For whoever is curious, here's the whole story:

I started the job and actually broke loose the swingarm pivot with a 3/8" rod, but I finished pulling the bolt out with a 5/16" rod.

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There were a couple of issues with the 3/8" rod:

1st - With the swingarm bolt still stuck, I couldn't measure its outside diameter to see how small the two nuts had to be ground down to follow it through. Now that it's out, I know that they have to be less than 0.665" - I could have pulled the bolt through with the 3/8" rod when I gave up on it.

2nd - The inside diameter of the swingarm bolt is slightly narrower at the threads than the rest of it. A 3/8 rod fits freely through the unthreaded part of the swingarm bolt, but it's a real tight squeeze through the threaded part. Pushing it through damaged the threads on the rod slightly. You can still get a nut on it, but it's difficult to turn - you'll need a wrench.

So, yeah, you CAN use a 3/8 rod to pull the bolt out, but make sure you grind/file whatever you use as a stopper down to less than 0.665 of an inch. And you'll be working with slightly damaged threads.

The advantages of a 3/8" rod? If you need to pound hard on it, it should be a little sturdier than 5/16.

Allthread is only about a dollar per foot. Maybe get a three foot section each of 5/16 and 3/8 and save yourself a trip to the store if you destroy one of them.

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Great solution for a stuck pivot pin.....keep that sucker greased and it will be a whole lot easier to remove next time.....

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Did chuckle at this one :lol: a friend ended up taking a weekend to remove his after i repeatedly told him to remove it and clean and grease it up , he ended up turning the bike upside down and using a hacksaw cutting through the bolt in several places to remove it :lol: looks like you have found a better way well done bet you wont leave it so long next time :banana:

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An overgrown piston pin puller.

The wooden dowel probably absorbed too much energy to do any good.

Yeah, greasing those parts from time-to-time works, too.

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Neat way, I laid mine on its side with a wood block under the SA pivot, then set about the pin with a brass drift and lump hammer, it came out! But yours is a cleaner and probably safer way, but I expect there will be times when shock is still needed!

Dan

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Nice job on the puller! My 08 has 600 miles on it. Now would probably be the best time to pull it apart and grease those bearings.

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... but I expect there will be times when shock is still needed!

At first I tightened the nut to the point where I thought the rod would almost bend or break ... and the swingarm bolt still didn't budge. (Those all-thread rods are made of soft steel.) Then I gave the other end of the rod about a dozen LIGHT taps with a hammer and I was able to tighten the nut about another 1/8 of a turn. Some more light taps and I was able to tighten the nut another 1/4 of a turn. After tapping and tightening ... and tapping and tightening for 2 or 3 complete turns, I was able to turn the nut without tapping the other end of the rod anymore.

The night before, I did squirt some WD40 on both ends of the swingarm bolt and into the spaces between the engine case and the swingarm. When the bolt finally came out, it was covered with WD40 so that must have helped to pull it out after it broke loose.

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I bought this bike new 18 months ago and it hasn't seen a whole lot of water. I guess this goes to show that one of the first things you should do when you buy a DRZ is to grease the swingarm pivot bolt.

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I need to do this, but I'm worried. I have a 2000 E model. I have a feeling it's never been out. I'm wondering if I should just leave it alone. I may do more damage removing it.

Great write up. I'm definitely going to use your method when the time comes.

Steve

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I guess this goes to show that one of the first things you should do when you buy a DRZ is to grease the swingarm pivot bolt

That should be in the FAQ

Or the Basic FAQ thread

:lol: :lol:

A swing arm bolt that is truly stuck, as in corrosion, from a few years of neglect. Most likely will not come out using a tool like this.

If it's just being a bit stubborn, this is a good way to remove the bolt. Brass drift works well also under the same conditions and needs. Just do not miss And keep in mid, a wood drift, is never going to put the kind of shock needed to move a seized bolt out. Brass, copper or other soft metal drift is what your looking for. :banana:

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The slap hammer is one of my favorite tricks. We use it all the time at work.

Great write up. You could have used allen-nuts instead of conventional nuts and saved a bit of filing. See McMaster.com they have almost everything hardware related, next day ground service, nearly unbeatable, but a bit pricey.

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I need to do this, but I'm worried. I have a 2000 E model. I have a feeling it's never been out. I'm wondering if I should just leave it alone. I may do more damage removing it.

Great write up. I'm definitely going to use your method when the time comes.

Steve

You should go for it. I was in the same boat and hadn't taken mine out (bought new in 2000) until last summer. And I promise you, it wasn't babied in the interim (check my avatar).

I ended up laying the bike on one side and letting penetrating oil soak overnight, then doing the same on the other side. After that I laid the bike on it's right side, put a drift on the end of the bolt and carefully applied the precision alignment tool (ie: I beat the snot out of it with a 2 pound sledge) and it slid right out.

One trick I found is to leave the nut on the end of the bolt when you first hit it. Just thread the nut out till it's flush with the end of the bolt. That gives you a bigger surface to hit and protects the threads. Once it begins to move it'll be easier and you can take the nut off and drive it on through.

Good luck :banana:

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My DRZ has been thru hell and back in the last year, but I have no clue if the previous owner ever had it out so I've been DREADING taking it out. DREADING.

Nice write up! Gas for you!

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