Vertical Obstacles

So i stacked two tires and have been trying to clear them all day. 50% of the tries I get over them but the other 50% I end up falling down. I haven't got it mastered bc I dont know exactly what Im doing wrong or what I should do.

I get near the tires and pull in the clutch, build the revs and pop it. I lift the front wheel a bit and then I hit the tires. The front of the bike comes up very fast and I can't stay on it. I find that I ease the throttle out when Im panicked and maybe thats my problem (lose momentum, fall over) but i feel that if I give her more gas Ill just flip the bike.

Anyways, how are vertical obstacles cleared in enduro? not just tires, but logs, or really vertical slabs of stone. thanks a lot:worthy:

Go around.

LOGS : Raise front wheel where it kisses the top edge of the log. Roll off throttle just as rear wheel hits log. Weight back.

Dwight

watch this

make what's beyond it your goal, don't focus on the obstacle--that will help with momentum and follow through.

You might try cheating--put something a little rampy at the bottom that will smooth it out(like a small log or a bit of dirt), then you can get a feel for how much "pop" and the feel of how much momentum to get over it, then you can take away your cheat.

watch this

To add to this great video....watch this video.

Double Blip

I want to add this written description....this technique is great for logs.

Double Blip!

The double blip technique is used for obstacles which are shorter in height then

the wheelbase of the motorcycle and often slightly angled. In the double blip

technique the rider approaches the obstacle at slow to moderate speed and blips

the throttle to lift the front wheel. The rider bends his knees to allow the

motorcycle to come up to him while staying centered. If done correctly the front

wheel strikes a glancing blow off the obstacle and changes direction to parallel

up the surface of the obstacle. At this point the throttle is reduced to allow the

rear suspension to uncompress. The rear suspension should be fully uncompressed

when the rear wheel reaches the base of the obstacle. Just before the rear wheel

contacts the obstacle the throttle is again blipped to drive the rear wheel into

the obstacle. As this is happening the rider straightens his legs to help drive

the rear wheel into the obstacle as well as get his weight over the front wheel.

The throttle is snapped off to allow the rear wheel to drive up the face of the

obstacle while at the same time the rear suspension begins to uncompress. The

rider again bends his knees allowing the rear of the bike to come up under him.

The unloading rear suspension pivots the bike forward around the axis of the

swingarm and the drag of the decelerating motor pivot the motorcycle around the

rear axle. The reason there is a limit to the size of the obstacle for this

technique is that the front wheel cannot be in tight contact with the obstacle

when the rear suspension unloads for the second time as both front and rear will

just push you backwards off the wall. The most common error in the double blip

technique is not shutting the throttle off between blips. This causes the rear

suspension to stay loaded which doesn't allow the motorcycle to efficiently change

the direction of force from straight forward to up. If done properly the rear of

the motorcycle does not hit the base of the obstacle with any more force then is

necessary to grab traction for the climb.

Dan Williams

I have been working on building an endurocourse behind my house. I have done the tires that are stacked. I rolled up to it in first (dont pull in the clutch) and hit the gas and stand it up till rite when the rear wheel contacts the tires, then let off. The little bite off bit from hitting the rear wheel on the tires with sum power to it will bunny hop the rear end and send u rite over it. No problem. Make sure ur standing while doing this.

Some interesting techniques :worthy: I'll have to employ some of them on my next ride (I hope the snow goes away soon)

I like Dwight's thing about going around :lol:

Thanks

~Tator

I've seen the utube video, great stuff! If the old , fat guy can do it! I can do it! :lol:

I've seen the utube video, great stuff! If the old , fat guy can do it! I can do it! :lol:

fyi the "old fat guy" is a multi time trials champ. it's not all about fitness it's technique, although fitness doesn't hurt.

Bryce

fyi the "old fat guy" is a multi time trials champ. it's not all about fitness it's technique, although fitness doesn't hurt.

Bryce

Yeah, I was being a little sarcastic. You can tell he's been riding since he could walk. No pads, 3/4 helmet, throwing that bike around and making it look so easy, you can tell he has SKILLS!

:lol:

Hehe, i startet train vertical obstacles lately.

This is not the best try, but i think its not that bad, since the Rock has no clear surface where the wheel can climb on.

Would be nice to get som advices and comments :lol:

Hehe, i startet train vertical obstacles lately.

This is not the best try, but i think its not that bad, since the Rock has no clear surface where the wheel can climb on.

Would be nice to get som advices and comments :lol:

Did you see the double blip video on the first page?

Hehe, i startet train vertical obstacles lately.

This is not the best try, but i think its not that bad, since the Rock has no clear surface where the wheel can climb on.

Would be nice to get som advices and comments :lol:

What your doing wrong, even though you made it, is your not putting your front wheel onto that rock. Watch the vid and read that article by Dan Williams.
What your doing wrong, even though you made it, is your not putting your front wheel onto that rock. Watch the vid and read that article by Dan Williams.

exactly, you need to bounce the front tire off the top edge of the rock. doing that will preload the front and rear suspension enough to sort of bunny hop the bike, enough to get the rear tire over the breakover point so it stops trapping the rear wheel.

Bryce

Thanks! Great advice! :p

Gotta try that one again.

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