fork annodizing

not sure but is it annodizing they do on some of the pro circuit forks??

or any other forks cos i was goin to do a few parts on my bike and was wondering if i could just get someone to do it or is it serious stuff??

Serious stuff.

DLC or Titanium Nitride on the steel parts and usualy anodize or a "kashmier" coating on the Alum.

Not you every day flavor anodize.

ok so wont ask him to do that then, what about making the outside of the tubes

like on the factory ohlins?? making them goldish possible??

If the anodizer can do colors, gold should be no problem. Just make sure they cap the ends and anodize ONLY the outside of the tube! Colored anodizing is decorative only and offers no protection to the aluminum!

ok thanks for speedy reply, what most concerns me, is there something already coating it?? which cant be coated

There is an anodizing on it already - that's why I suggest you tell your anodizer to cap the ends of the tubes - so they DON'T remove the factory finish from the inside of the tube. They can strip the anodizing off the outside only with what is basically a strong detergent solution. Then they re-anodize to the color of your choosing.

If the anodizer can do colors, gold should be no problem. Just make sure they cap the ends and anodize ONLY the outside of the tube! Colored anodizing is decorative only and offers no protection to the aluminum!

It does offer protection...but I know you know that. Ya know, oxidation.

Did you mean rocks and stuff?

Anodizing is a process used to oxidation the surface of aluminum, the oxidized film protects the aluminum from further oxidation and thickness determine the durability and degree of protection. Aluminum oxide is very hard; file hard, but the underying aluminum is soft and can be easily bruised.

Oxidized aluminum is white and is often dyed for cosmective reasons, color retention will only be as good as the UV resistance of the dye used; I've seem the color fade on bikes only a few years old and the dye look like new on aluminum window frames that are twenty years old.

Titanium nitride is a vapor deposited coating used on metals, mainly steel, it is only a few molecules thick, very hard and low friction. Most commonly used to improve the operation and extend the life of cutting tools such as drills and end mills.

well, there you have the technical explanation. Awesome!

thanks all

Don't worry about using a local anodizer for this operation. In fact, have them do the insides as well.

The factory anodize on the inside does wear out. Your anodizer will etch the old surface coating off then re-anodize the entire part. On the polished inner surfaces the difference between the factory and new anodize will be no more than +/-0.002", which isn't enough to screw up the tolerancing on the inside of the fork.

The outside rough machined surfaces will grow and shrink more, but the polished surface shouldn't vary much.

-Tom

Don't worry about using a local anodizer for this operation. In fact, have them do the insides as well.

The factory anodize on the inside does wear out. Your anodizer will etch the old surface coating off then re-anodize the entire part. On the polished inner surfaces the difference between the factory and new anodize will be no more than +/-0.002", which isn't enough to screw up the tolerancing on the inside of the fork.

The outside rough machined surfaces will grow and shrink more, but the polished surface shouldn't vary much.

-Tom

WRONG!! :lol:

The insides of any modern MX fork have a teflon impregated coating. This keeps the bushing sliding nicely and the stuff does not wear off unless major dirt gets inside of the fork is run for a prolonged amount of time with no oil in it.

Hard anodizing, known as Type III, will protect the aluminum from wear, but colored "decorative" anodizing will not.

Believe me, I had to work on an old set of Kyle Lewis "factory" forks that had the outer tubes completely stripped and anodized red. They were destroyed inside!

The insides of any modern MX fork have a teflon impregated coating. This keeps the bushing sliding nicely and the stuff does not wear off unless major dirt gets inside of the fork is run for a prolonged amount of time with no oil in it.

Anodizing (Type II) DOES protect from rubbing better than bare aluminum but not nearly as well as hard coat (Type III).

The Teflon is news to me. I have torn down 2 sets of forks (both acquired used) and one of the two had significant wear. I assumed 50% to be a normal rate. Have seen lots of photos of worn tubes inside as well.

There you have it, plug 'em!

-Tom

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