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Cush Drive/sprocket carrier question

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Slop in Cush Drive:

My '06 DR650 is now up to 23,000 miles. Only 6000 off road. (more or less)

At about 8K miles I went with a new chain and sprockets for an upcoming

Baja trip.

For a while now I've noticed some "slop" at the rear sprocket/cush drive. I'm talking about forward and back, about 1/8". If you grab the sprocket you can move it back and forth. I never noticed this before. Is this much movement always there?

There is just bit of slop also when you "wiggle" the rear sprocket left to right. This seems more within "normal" tolerance, but I'm guessing here.

But the for and aft movement is the one I'm not sure about. The bearings inside have a nice smooth feel and have always had plenty of lube/cleaning at every tire change. Very little rain riding.

Do the actual rubber cush drive inserts wear enough to cause this?

Is that amount of slack normal or ..... ? Any Ideas/ theories? :lol:

This is my third post asking for help today .... can you guys tell I'm servicing my DR? :worthy:

As always, thanks in advance and ride safe!

:banghead:

Patrick

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If there is fore and aft movement then the rubbers are probably worn in the cush drive, had mine apart at 20k and they were still snug when I did the bearings. Thought it might need the rubbers replaced by then, guess the guy that had it before me was gentle with it. :lol:

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I doubt that that the cush rubbers wear that much. I beat the &%$#@! out of my DR (lots of full throttle pavement launches included). My guess would be the hub bearings. If there is some side to side movement as you mention, then that kind of indicates the bearings.

Try an ALL BALLS kit bearing as a replacement.

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Thanks guys.

I've got a rear tire change coming up soon, so I'll have a closer look/feel of the inner bearings then.

I appreciate the suggestions!

Patrick :lol:

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Slop in Cush Drive:

My '06 DR650 is now up to 23,000 miles. Only 6000 off road. (more or less)

At about 8K miles I went with a new chain and sprockets for an upcoming

Baja trip.

For a while now I've noticed some "slop" at the rear sprocket/cush drive. I'm talking about forward and back, about 1/8". If you grab the sprocket you can move it back and forth. I never noticed this before. Is this much movement always there?

There is just bit of slop also when you "wiggle" the rear sprocket left to right. This seems more within "normal" tolerance, but I'm guessing here.

But the for and aft movement is the one I'm not sure about. The bearings inside have a nice smooth feel and have always had plenty of lube/cleaning at every tire change. Very little rain riding.

Do the actual rubber cush drive inserts wear enough to cause this?

Is that amount of slack normal or ..... ? Any Ideas/ theories? :lol:

This is my third post asking for help today .... can you guys tell I'm servicing my DR? :worthy:

As always, thanks in advance and ride safe!

:banghead:

Patrick

If the cush drive inserts are in good condition there should be no movement with the sprocket.

Once you have the rear wheel removed, if the sprocket dropped of by itself, it's time to change the rubber inserts. With new inserts, you have to apply some force to press the sprocket into the wheel, and it will not drop off.

Anyway those rubber inserts cost about USD25/set, change them and have some peace of mind when riding.

:busted:

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If the cush drive inserts are in good condition there should be no movement with the sprocket.

Once you have the rear wheel removed, if the sprocket dropped of by itself, it's time to change the rubber inserts. With new inserts, you have to apply some force to press the sprocket into the wheel, and it will not drop off.

Anyway those rubber inserts cost about USD25/set, change them and have some peace of mind when riding.

:worthy:

Ah Ha! Interesting you should mention that! My sprocket starting "falling out" about two tires ago!! :lol: Seems like $25 Cush rubbers is worth a try. Thanks!

Patrick :banghead:

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I really doubt that its the cush rubbers. Mine ' fell out the first time I pulled the wheel off. Cushion rubbers aren't gonna wear as fast as fast as the drive components.

Given your bike's mileage, I'd bet money that the rear hub bearings are bad. I replaced my rear bearings at 25K km. The 2 on the left side seamed good, but the one on the disk side was pooched. I bet if you check that one, you might find your problem.

I'd put money on the rear wheel, disk side bearing gone bad. Is that unequivocal enough?

Just a thought!

Let us know how it turns out.

Jason

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Thanks a lot Jason! I will check them carefully! :lol:

Are they hard to get to, to get them out?

How about going in?

Cheers,

Patrick :worthy:

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aha! think I might replace mine as well as the sprocket falls out if you even angle it slightly. Might wait another 3000 or so though and replace the whole drive train as a set. Sitting on 27,000 and still the original chain and sprockets :lol: . Love that cush drive :worthy:

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Patrick,

The easiest way to remove bearings, is with a bearing puller. If you don't have one, here's the drill.......

Select a large hammer and punch.

On the DR the center hub bearings are seperated by an aluminium collar. Working with a punch, gentlly probe the center hub (collar) until you feel the edge of the bearing. Align the punch with theoutside lip of the bearing -the punch is down the hole, and at an angle to the bore of the hole. Hammer the punch as you move it around the circumfrence of the bearing's outer rim .You might have to hit it pretty hard to remove the bearing. Be sure to hit all the way around the circumfrence of the bearing's outer edge, evenly. Keep banging till the bearing fall out - but not so hard that you break shit - I forgot to mention it, but remove the dust seals first.

To install bearings. Grease the hell out of them, or better yet, buy sealed bearings -all lubed up and ready for a lifetime of service. Again, a bearing press/puller is best.

If you don't have one, find something (pipe works good) with the same outside diamter (OD) as your bearings outside edge. Gently use your tool to tap the bearing into its seat. Be sure to tap around the bearing in an even circular motion.

That's it, nothing to it Patrick!

Ok, That sounds way easier than it will probably be. It's not so bad if you take your time and go slow. Better yet, get a bearing puller/press tool kit and read the instructions.

Either way, good luck!

Do the same with the cush drive bearing.

Jason

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i can move my sprocket loads thanks to the cush drive rubbers, had the bike apart recently, they look fine, just a bit of play, doesnt really bother me

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I really doubt that its the cush rubbers. Mine ' fell out the first time I pulled the wheel off. Cushion rubbers aren't gonna wear as fast as fast as the drive components.

Given your bike's mileage, I'd bet money that the rear hub bearings are bad. I replaced my rear bearings at 25K km. The 2 on the left side seamed good, but the one on the disk side was pooched. I bet if you check that one, you might find your problem.

I'd put money on the rear wheel, disk side bearing gone bad. Is that unequivocal enough?

Just a thought!

Let us know how it turns out.

Jason

If the bearings are shot, the play is usually side to side.

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Another good reason to change the cush drive inserts is vibration. Rubber compresses and becomes hard over time increasing chain related vibrations.

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bearings....yes, as others have said

cush drive......most definitely yes....YES......YES

as mx_rob and just a few others have said, they do wear

BUT

how do you tell if they are worn too far????.....check your owners maintenance manual & it'll tell you what is the wear limit

another way......buy 'em anyway, and then lay the old one out right next to the new one...........:ride:..........seeing them this way, you will have wondered just why you waited so long:smirk:

the cush drive is like a new pair or jogging shoes.....we runners will plod along on the old shoes forever...until they even fall apart on our feet!!....we really do not notice just how bad they have gotten because gradually over time, they get just a little bit worse every day

BUT

when we slip on those brand new bad boys, our feet feel GREAT......our knees, never better....oer back doesn't hurt anymore after a long run!!!:p

why wait and pinch pennies for 25 bucks.....the difference you will feel will be amazing!!

oh yeah.....post up some pics of the cush drive new & old next to each other so others will see too

remember ya'll, this simple part saves wear & tear on your clutch & your transmission:bonk:

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why wait and pinch pennies for 25 bucks.....the difference you will feel will be amazing!!

iagree.gif

Yup..... keeps things nice and tight

Usually every other rear tire :p

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+1 on changing them. Just did mine at 33K, they looked just like the new ones but surprise surprise, they fit tight and the wheel is actually tough to get into the swingarm. Also check the axle, mine was worn .004" where the drive bearings rode and that was enough to feel as well as trash the bearings

The whole project is pretty easy and I found a few threads that explained quite well. I went with all balls and pried them open for more lube as suggested

I only wish the sleeve spacer between the hub bearings was aluminum (probably not strong enough) as stated above. Mine was a cheap iron P.O.S. that had corroded pretty bad, no way to get lube in there w/o pulling the bearings

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Patrick,

The easiest way to remove bearings, is with a bearing puller. If you don't have one, here's the drill.......

Select a large hammer and punch.

On the DR the center hub bearings are seperated by an aluminium collar. Working with a punch, gentlly probe the center hub (collar) until you feel the edge of the bearing. Align the punch with theoutside lip of the bearing -the punch is down the hole, and at an angle to the bore of the hole. Hammer the punch as you move it around the circumfrence of the bearing's outer rim .You might have to hit it pretty hard to remove the bearing. Be sure to hit all the way around the circumfrence of the bearing's outer edge, evenly. Keep banging till the bearing fall out - but not so hard that you break shit - I forgot to mention it, but remove the dust seals first.

To install bearings. Grease the hell out of them, or better yet, buy sealed bearings -all lubed up and ready for a lifetime of service. Again, a bearing press/puller is best.

Jason

Thanks Jason! I've used this technique before on other bikes/bearings, just wanted to make sure it was the same on the DR. I don't have a puller that will work for those bearings. I'll see if I can get a thin punch on the edge of the bearing!

Thanks again!

Patrick:ride:

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Hey, great pics and write up!

Damnest thing .... last tire change and stood there and looked and looked at those cush rubbers and couldn't see anything wrong with them. In my brilliance ... I thought ".... hmmmm, maybe I can just GLUE THEN IN THERE!!"

:moon:

Nice idea huh? Well, logic returned and I didn't do it but just stuffed the old ones back in.

I plan to change all the bearings and cush drive rubbers!

Thanks to EVERYONE for all your experience and wisdom!! :p:ride::moon:

Will report back when job is done for a follow up "before and after" comment.

Patrick :lol:

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