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What is the proper way to brake on a 4-stroke

last season i would come in pinned, let off, pull in the clutch then lock up the rear brakes, (i use the front brakes too i am just wondering about the back)

when the race season was done i went out riding before the snow came and i was working on 4-stroke techniques that i read on the computer

i was rolling on the throttle and braking with the clutch out

but my brake pads took a beating

is this normal or am i suposed to use the clutch sometimes???

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Proper technique is clutch out braking. Some schools will disconnect the clutch cable and make you do laps to teach this. The technique is the same for all bikes, but 4 strokes allow you hold the throttle open longer before letting off because of the increased engine braking. So go at that corner pinned, let off at the last minute, don't touch the clutch and brake as hard as you can without locking the rear up (or it will stall). That is proper braking. This is not to say you don't keep a finger on the clutch just in case the rear locks up you might be able to save it (keep from stalling) if you're quick on the lever. You should use the clutch (if need be) exiting the corner to get the power to the ground.

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I've never heard of braking without the clutch, that doesn't make any sense and could cause major engine problems.

Pull that clutch in, pinch the seat and hit the binders. Focus on the front brake, but also use the rear. When you enter the turn even if you are still going faster than you're comfortable with let off the rear brake as you won't be able to lean into the turn as well. Keep dragging the front brake and lean into the turn, start to power on as you feel comfortable.

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I've never heard of braking without the clutch, that doesn't make any sense and could cause major engine problems.

Pull that clutch in, pinch the seat and hit the binders. Focus on the front brake, but also use the rear. When you enter the turn even if you are still going faster than you're comfortable with let off the rear brake as you won't be able to lean into the turn as well. Keep dragging the front brake and lean into the turn, start to power on as you feel comfortable.

how is using the engines natural braking cause engine problems?? i havnt had a single problem with my motor..

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I was always told you have two options gas or brake never let off unless your on the brakes. If you let the engine brake you its not enough (if your going fast enough)and the brakes will do it job much faster leaving more time to run into the turn faster

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I've never heard of braking without the clutch, that doesn't make any sense and could cause major engine problems.

Pull that clutch in, pinch the seat and hit the binders. Focus on the front brake, but also use the rear. When you enter the turn even if you are still going faster than you're comfortable with let off the rear brake as you won't be able to lean into the turn as well. Keep dragging the front brake and lean into the turn, start to power on as you feel comfortable.

What????

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I was always told you have two options gas or brake never let off unless your on the brakes. If you let the engine brake you its not enough (if your going fast enough)and the brakes will do it job much faster leaving more time to run into the turn faster

........ and What????? again.

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........ and What????? again.

I believe he was trying to say in chinese that if your only using the engine braking to slow you down your not going fast enough.

Not only does braking with the clutch out slow you down much faster. It doesn't upset your suspension and get your tires sliding. Contrary to this guys advice, sliding into a corner isn't the fastest way around.

goon-rin.jpg

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I believe he was trying to say in chinese that if your only using the engine braking to slow you down your not going fast enough.

Not only does braking with the clutch out slow you down much faster. It doesn't upset your suspension and get your tires sliding. Contrary to this guys advice, sliding into a corner isn't the fastest way around.

goon-rin.jpg

Is that a scene from next weeks Nitro Circus???? :p

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I wasn't referring to "engine braking" rather the actual brakes on the bike. What would be the point of only using engine braking to slow you down?

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The only thing with clutch out braking, is the risk of stalling.

Although, i think its more suited to outdoor style tracks...whereas i would grab all three at the same time on tighter, supercrossy tracks.

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I wasn't referring to "engine braking" rather the actual brakes on the bike. What would be the point of only using engine braking to slow you down?

I wasn't referring to you, but the guy who typed in broken english. Your right only using engine braking would be very slow. While the combination of engine braking and the actual brakes are the the fastest way to slow down. Not sure where you got your information that it damages the engine, but that is incorrect. If that was the case then everytime your not on the gas and your bike is rolling its doing some kind of damage. Not true.

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I dont see a problem with braking with the clutch let out.... prove it t yourself... go fast, brake with clutch pulled in, mark spot, try again with clutch let out. results might surprise you. Note: traction is greatest just before the tires lock up.

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i think someones confused. when braking with the clutch out you kick the shifter down(down shifting) without touching the clutch. this will not damage the bike. the difference with braking with clutch in or out is that you have the added stopping power of the engine so braking with the clutch out will obviously stop you faster. but it might wear your pads out faster because your wheel isnt locked, its moving. so theres friction which will wear your pads.

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When I first read someone say using the clutch out to stop I envisioned someone coming down a straightaway and rapidly down shifting to slow down enough for the turn.

We could debate for days whether it is better to brake with your clutch in or out, In my eyes using the rear brake without the clutch is senseless. The ease of stalling for me outweighs the benefits, especially when the rear brake does not do the majority of your stopping(or shouldn't atleast). The Front brake is far more powerful, so making yourself so vulnerable to stalling for so little gain doesn't seem worth it to me. Especially for beginner to intermediate riders who do not use the front brake even close to it's ability.

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yes the front brake is the most important. just gotta let off before you start turning so you dont fall.

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When braking with the clutch out, do I need to pull it in everytime that I downshift during my braking or I just downshift without touching the clutch?

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On a 250F ( I don't really remember technique I used on a 450 )

but on a 250F I found you can keep it pinned well into a corner and get on the brakes way later.

It's something a 2 stroke pilot appreciates for sure.

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