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Electrical system: What's going on here? (with pics)

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I was trying to figure out why my DRZ isn't charging and I found a connection that is disconnected. One end was wrapped in electrical tape and inside has a wire jumping from one side to the other.

So my questions are: What is the purpose of this connection, and why would someone disconnect it and jump the wires on one end? Should I reconnect it, or is it likely that this modification was done to circumvent a different problem?

IMG_0690.JPG

Here's a close-up photo showing the wire inside the connector:

IMG_0693.JPG

By the way, the bike is a 2001 DRZ-S with close to 14,000 miles on it (half of which I put on it myself in the year that I've owned it.) It runs great other than the electrical problems. It's been the best money I've ever spent. :p

Thanks!

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That my friend, is an extreme poor example of how not to do the 'kick stand switch' mod. I am surprised it has not failed you already.

Sadlt, it has nothing to do with your charging woes. First, check the fuse holder near the battery and the connector between the fuse holder and the harness. Next, look at the plug to the Reg/Rect. Do the free power mod if you have not already done so. Still no charging, then you need check the stator according to the excellent FAQ written by Noble.

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Thanks for the info William. I just ran through Noble's FAQ and I still am not sure what's going on. Here's what I figured out so far:

Powered off the the battery is reading at 12.78V <-- Good

Running (regardless of RPM) the voltage is reading 12.2V <-- BAD

All three phases on the yellow wires: 0.5-0.6 ohms <-- Good

Running AC voltages were all about 90V depending on RPMS <-- Good?

All diodes checks showed no continuity one direction, and 0.5v the other way <-- Good

Checked the fuse and it looked OK, replaced anyway <-- Good

Current leakage test measured less than 2ma <-- Good

Running voltage of red/black from the RR was only 0.7V <-- Bad?

So does that mean it's the RR? If so what is a good replacement RR?

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I see no mention of checking for continuity to ground between the yellow wires, There should be none.

Running voltage of red/black from the RR was only 0.7V <-- Bad? - Cannot be checked this way, must have a battery in the system, so this is an invalid test.

Did the plugs at the RR and harness look good? No signs of corrosion or melting? Did the plug near the fuse also look good?

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William's advise is right on. It is important to know if any of the stator coils are shorted to ground.

If you do intend to do the "Free Power" mod you can go ahead and cut into the insulation of the RR wires (red and Black) so you can check the voltage close to the RR with the system fully connected. I only approve of this if you are going to cut off the damaged insulation anyway as you do the "free Power" mod. The other method is to use a fine strand of wire and connect it to the connector pins then push the connector together. That way you don't damage any insulation. Because you are only checking voltage and not drawing any power, the fine wire will give a correct reading. The technique is called "pin out".

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There is an alternative to the fine strand of wire which lessens the likelihood of bent connector pins or distorted terminals, or damaged connector sealing systems. In my trade we call it backprobing, and you can use a small straightened paper clip or a similar probe like a T-pin and go in from the backside of the hardshell connector, just avoid damaging the little rubber seal around the wire if there is one. I use this all the time when doing electrical diagnostics on engine sensors and the like. The other plus is that you don't have to pull the connector apart to remove your probe. This is also useful for testing the voltage drop through a suspect connector, by measuring voltage at either side of the connector with current applied.

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This has been very helpful. Thanks again guys :p So here's what I came up with:

I yanked a pair of wires out of some CAT5 cable I had laying around and used them to measure the voltage using the pin-out method which Noble described (pics attached.) Key turned off it measured about 12.55v. Running, even at fairly high RPM, it didn't go above 12.9V.

And the last thing I checked, which I missed the first time :moon: , was the continuity from each of the 3 yellow wires coming from the stator. All three measured less than 1 Ohm which I assume means I need a new stator, correct? Any recommendations on replacement stators if this is the case?

Pin-out pics before reconnecting the connector:

IMG_0695.JPG

and pic-out pics after reconnecting the connector:

IMG_0696.JPG

And yes, I know i need to clean my airbox/filter and everything else :ride:

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Just to clarify, "pin out" should be done with very fine wire so as not to damage the connector. 1 strand from a multistrand wire is all that is needed. (.003 inch diameter).

If you have less then 1 ohm resistance from any of the 3 yellow stator wires to ground, the stator is bad. I am surprised you are getting any charging with less then 1 ohm resistance to ground.

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If you have less then 1 ohm resistance from any of the 3 yellow stator wires to ground, the stator is bad. I am surprised you are getting any charging with less then 1 ohm resistance to ground.

Nope, it's not charging. I keep it on the battery tender when I put it away at night so I usually leave the house with a full charge. Last time I went woods riding it only lasted a couple of hours before the lights went out. Then the instrument panel went out. Then it started sputtering at higher RPMs and as the battery became weaker I'd have to go slower and slower to keep it firing. Barely made it back to camp. That's when I decided it was time to diagnose the problem :ride: Guess it's time to start researching new stators...

Thanks for all the help people :p

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