Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Trials Tire: Should I be afraid to...?

Recommended Posts

Im in the final stages of getting my 18 inch rear wheel finished up and im kind of thinking over the trials tire thing. Its going to be amazing for the type of riding i do around here and the type of soil. The thing im worried about is should i be afraid to "get on it"? Im fairly calm\smooth in the trails and dont whip it around but when i see an open spot to jump on the throttle ill do it, will it hurt anything if i get on it some times?

Also what about sand whoops? should i be afraid to attack those? Ive heard the 803 is squirly at speeds and about 3 times i year i head to my friends place in virginia and we ride open fields on a circuit he has and im afraid to go fast on it and i dont want to lose to him on his 150rb :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll never know unless you give them a try.

Two things contribute to the traction of trials tires; radial contruction and lots of knobs. Radial tire contruction uses zero angle side wall plies with a radial belt under the tread, the result is the sidewalls have a lot of flex, but the tread has a longer footprint than a regular tire which results in more traction. The radial belt stabilizes the tread and allows you to run low pressures for more traction. If you run a knbby at 6psi it will also be squerrely at speed. Others have posted that the Michelin has the most traction and softest sidewall, Dunlops a little stiffer, Pirelli stiffer, etc; do a search.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try the pirelli mt43. It looses a bit to competition trials tires in the traction dept due to teh bias ply, but it still beats out a knobby easily in just about every condition I've encountered, and it does NOT feel squirrely at high speed or if you feel like ripping on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have put about 4000 miles on trials tires and here is my feeling based on my experience. As far as "getting on it" I don't believe you will harm the tire any, however it is not very effective at hooking up when it is spinning. The best technique is to learn exacly how much you can give it up to the point of spinning but not go past it.

As far as feeling squirley at speeds there is some truth to that. I found the Michelen the squirliest by far. The Dunlop was not bad and the Mitas was almost as good as any knobby I have tried. On one occasion I had to ride my Mitas down a highway for about 45 miles at 60 to 65 MPH and it handled great. Meanwhile my dad who had the Michelen on at the time looked like and felt like he had a flat tire.

I run a trials tire almost exclusivly when riding the mountains but run a knobby in the winter when I have to ride the desert.

Hope this helps some.

Brunsie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be prepared and carry a tube and everything else required to change and air up with. When trials tires flat you have to fix it, no riding on flatted trials tires, it will wreck the tire and everything else. My personal favorite was the IRC tubeless Trials tire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have put about 4000 miles on trials tires and here is my feeling based on my experience. As far as "getting on it" I don't believe you will harm the tire any, however it is not very effective at hooking up when it is spinning. The best technique is to learn exacly how much you can give it up to the point of spinning but not go past it.

As far as feeling squirley at speeds there is some truth to that. I found the Michelen the squirliest by far. The Dunlop was not bad and the Mitas was almost as good as any knobby I have tried. On one occasion I had to ride my Mitas down a highway for about 45 miles at 60 to 65 MPH and it handled great. Meanwhile my dad who had the Michelen on at the time looked like and felt like he had a flat tire.

I run a trials tire almost exclusivly when riding the mountains but run a knobby in the winter when I have to ride the desert.

Hope this helps some.

Brunsie

thanks, that helped a lot. Ive already got a tire, i purchased it before i bought my wheel b\c it was a good deal. $70 including shipping for a dunlop.

i guess i might have to invest in a tool pouch just incase, as much as i hate changing tires i doubt id be able to do it on the trail :p But im not gona jinx myself and im just going to run a ultra heavy duty tube at 8psi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone who buys/uses a Pirelli MT43 is WASTING their money as it is NOT a radial design tire, and as such, will NOT provide anywhere near the traction as a radial trials tire does! It's all in the radial design folks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone who buys/uses a Pirelli MT43 is WASTING their money as it is NOT a radial design tire, and as such, will NOT provide anywhere near the traction as a radial trials tire does! It's all in the radial design folks!

Have you run one? True, it is not radial, but it DOES provide nearly the traction of a radial trials tire. Check the reviews, try one, something. I have got about 200 miles on mine and it beats out every knobby I've tried. I chose the pirelli specifially for the stiffer sidewall. You can run the pressure a bit lower, and it definitely still wraps around the ground like a trials tire should. It does not feel scary at high speed on pavement/gravel if the pressure is upped to about 10lbs. Great all around tire. There is more to a trials tire than the radial ply. Lets keep in mind, the MT43 is a tire that Pirelli designed modeled after a competition trials tire aimed specifically at TRAIL riding.

J.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try a NueTech Tubliss (sp); no pinch flats and you can run low pressure without rim slip or pulled tube stem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to try the tubliss system. A bit rich for my taste in this time of financial misfortune though. There's another reason I chose the pirelli. Stiffer sidewalls = less chance of pinch flats.

J.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Be prepared and carry a tube and everything else required to change and air up with. When trials tires flat you have to fix it, no riding on flatted trials tires, it will wreck the tire and everything else.

I've ridden as much as 10-15 miles in rocky terrain (including some pavement) with a flat x-11 w/o hurting anything, but I'm light and was riding gently. It was about like riding a flat s12 (also a flimsy tire).

I do carry a pump and patch kit, but in 10,000+ miles of riding trials tires, I haven't gotten a flat yet.

For the OP, ride as hard as you want, the tire won't mind. I ride mine pretty aggressively when I'm in the mood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Juliend, NICE justification for your waste of money. Your argument shows your ignorance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not realize the Pirelli was not a radial. I have a friend who bought one but he now rides the desert almost exlusivly so he offered me his new Pirelli for $30 so I bought it. Was just waiting for the mountains to open up to put it on, now I am wondering if I screwed up. Oh well, in a few months I will be able to tell just how much the radial construction contributes to how well the trials tire works. Hope I am not regretting taking that tire off my friends hands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I did not realize the Pirelli was not a radial. I have a friend who bought one but he now rides the desert almost exlusivly so he offered me his new Pirelli for $30 so I bought it. Was just waiting for the mountains to open up to put it on, now I am wondering if I screwed up.

well, at least you'll know.

I haven't tried the pirelli, but many people have tried the pirelli as well as radial style trials tires and still have good things to say about the pirelli. They seem to be especially popular for dualsporters, since radial trials tires pretty well suck for any extended pavement runs.

If you don't want it, and it's still new, I'll give you $30 and a can of lukewarm busch lite for it so I can try it, and see how it does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Juliend, NICE justification for your waste of money. Your argument shows your ignorance.

You don't mention how many miles you have put on a Pirelli. I assume it is alot for you to be so sure of yourself. Please describe your actual riding experiences and number of miles on the Pirelli trials tire.

BTW, I would recommend that you please refrain from nastiness and name-calling here on TT, or your stay is likely to be a short one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Juliend, NICE justification for your waste of money. Your argument shows your ignorance.

It wasn't an argument. If I've learned anything in my 32 years, it would be that arguing with a closed minded individual will take you nowhere.

Brunsie,

Go ahead and mount up the Pirelli. I promise you will NOT be disappointed. Keep the pressure low for trail riding to keep traction, but bump it up a bit if you're going to be doing road riding. I'm usually somewhere around 6-8lbs.

J.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.stewardsofthesequoia.org/PDF/PirelliMT43TrialsTire.pdf

Here is a review of the pirelli, written by Chris Horgan. I assume Chris is not as outstanding and experienced as crfdoug, but I have ridden with him and I think he's a skilled, adventurous, experienced, and dedicated rider. Here he is tipping slightly over on a trail that we re-opened last summer after it hadn't been ridden for several years. The 2nd pic is 1/4 mile or so further on the same trail, but not of Chris. My bike is the orange one at the top of the 2nd pic in the way background. I rode the same trail (when we were working on it) 2 days earlier on an mx bike with a knobby and with a 13 lb chainsaw on the front of the bike. I found that to be a little sketchy for my tastes.

chris_horgan.jpg

slightsidehill.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've ridden as much as 10-15 miles in rocky terrain (including some pavement) with a flat x-11 w/o hurting anything,

I did that also but cracked my rim. The X-11 went flat from the stem getting ripped off. Now I run 2 rimlocks. Currently running an IRC. Grips about the same, but I think the x-11 wears longer.

I get some ribbing when I run it in a hare scramble. Last time I did I was the only one out of about 200 riders. I generally use a knobby for those now because they are really muddy. Everywhere else the trials tire outgrips the knobby. On rocks it is no comparision at all. I recommend 2 rimlocks on the rear though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

take a trials on loose dirt/sand and high speed sand, i dont think you would have much of any traction..

better for that hardpack, i dont think spinning tires will keep it gripping much..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

shelby, give me a shout and you can take a spin on my 30 ride Dunlop equipped 200. I give r hell just like a knobby now and it's holdin' up good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×