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will it do what i want?

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went to a yamaha shop the other day.... looked at a WR250R, looked very nice, not ridden one yet, looks like it will be good off road, also saw a TTR600RE. this i liked too, just looked a little low at the back, but was told they are good green lane bikes... anyone know for if they are, will the TTR be to heavey? whats the WR250 like on road too... i ride to the lanes and sometimes do 50/60 miles on road....

thanks

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WR250R is a great bike. I just picked mine up last week and have put my first 100 miles on it. It rides nice and travels comfortably on the road at 75mph. I also took it off road through sand, mud, and dirt, and even with the stock tires it handled ok. Definitaley going to upgrade the tires soon though.

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I have no idea what a green lane bike is. But CC is from the United Kingdom so maybe that has something to do with it. What are they charging over there for the WR?

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green lanes are simply just that... off road lanes that, well are green.... in woods open fields, mud, gravel.... all sorts, a bike that can handle all that and more and be able to handle slow hot running....

some green lanes

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I ride mine 64 miles per day round trip to work. It's really bred more for on-road handling, but does well offroad also. The green lanes shown in the pics above would be no problem what so ever for the WR. However, before you even think about getting off the pavement with it, change to an off-road only tire. This bike is heavy (299 lbs) in U.S. street legal form, and the tires are simply useless in the dirt. The weight of the bike, plus tires that slip and slide makes it a beast to ride offroad. Get some dirt tires on this thing and it's a whole different animal. If you don't want to jump right out with new tires on a new bike, be sure to bleed off some of the air pressure. I absolutely could not ride mine with stock tires and reccommended pressures. Letting off about 1/3 of the air pressure from the front & rear tires made them half way ridable. Search these threads, the biggest issue you will find with the bike that most everyone complains about is the stock tires. The bike really shouldn't even be ridden off the showroom floor without a new pair of dirt-only tires. The only other real issues people complain about with the bike are the fuel tank capacity and the seat height. I top mine off every night before I get home becuase I can't seem to make it to work for 2 days in a row unless I do. It's a very small tank, so if you see a gas station, stop and fill up. Also, I like a tall seat on my bikes. I set up sag for the right height, but I like a lot of travel. The seat is very tall, but that doesn't bother me. It does make a big issue with the side stnad though, as it is 1" too short. The bike leans way over on the stand and will fall if on softer ground. I made an aluminum stand for mine that is 1" longer than stock (25.4mm) and that cure the problem.

This is a great bike, but depending on your size, you may want the 600. If you're 175-220 lbs this bike will easily impress you. If you're heavier than that, it will struggle to impress you much. I would go with the 600 if I were over 220lbs. I'm 204 and it carries me just fine. While it's not as impressive as my TE-450 by any means, it wasn't designed to be. It is what it is. It's a great D.S. bike, but it won't haul a bigger guy. If you're a bigger guy and lookingfor something that will really lug you through some thick stuff, go with the 600.

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I'd go with a bigger bike myself, 300 lbs seems heavy for a 250cc.

The XR650L is 346 lbs (*Includes all standard equipment, required fluids and full tank of fuel-ready to ride).

There are other options out there too. Pretty much any dualsport bike with offroad tires will get you through the "green trails".

I think the best thing you could do would be to try a couple different bikes first. There must be some people in this forum near you - give it a try.

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I'd go with a bigger bike myself, 300 lbs seems heavy for a 250cc.

So if the bike is too heavy, your suggestion is to by an even heavier bike? :p

green lanes are simply just that... off road lanes that, well are green....

I get it... In the US we call them "trails." :ride:

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So if the bike is too heavy, your suggestion is to by an even heavier bike? :)

Well....the idea was to increase the power to weight ratio, not just the weight.

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Well....the idea was to increase the power to weight ratio, not just the weight.

Ah, I get it... Unless you race more power does not always equal a better experience.

I chose the WR250R over all the 650s because it's 50+ pounds lighter than any of them and the difference in horsepower is worth it when you factor in the WR's first valve check is scheduled at 26,000 miles and the air-cooled bikes are lucky to even make it that far.

The bike will keep up with any 650 on the road up to about 85-90 mph (actual) and will spank them all on tight single-track. The WR's suspension (when properly set-up of course) is light years better than the older low-tech bikes.

Throw in the 350 watt (!) alternator, 70 mpg and considering they are roughly the same price going with the WR was an absolute no-brainer for my purposes.

Here's a guy who bought a new WR250R and immediately got rid of his almost-new Husky TE610:

http://www.bigdogadventures.com/WR250R.htm

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This discussion goes back about a year now to when these things first started hitting the showrooms. I bought mine in May of last year. It now has 4,500 miles on it. There are many folks on here who get pretty hot-headed about this issue. They absolutely love this bike and think it's the coolest thing ever. They take it persoanlly when folks speak honestly and say something they don't want to hear about the bike.

I will start out by telling you that this is truely a great bike. It's the best dual sport I've ever owned or ridden. I've had a DR-250s, DR-200s (wfie's bike), KLX-250s and ridden all the rest. My cousin has a KLR-250 and new XR-650L that I have ridden with and ridden many times. The WR is a nicer bike, and believe me, as heavy as it is, the XR is the fattest pig in the pen. I've owned 7 brand new bikes since Sept. of 2005, so I have a pretty broad base of what the latest models are like.

Fuel injection on the WR means it starts every time. Weather has no bearing on wether or not it cranks. It's fairly comfortable and moreover it is really a blast to ride. I enjoy riding this bike. The reason I waited so long to buy one last year was the price. It's a hefty $1,000 more than my KLX was. I checked all these forums religiously and decided the only way to decide if it was better than my KLX was to buy one and ride the damned thing. Was it worth the extra $1,000? That is still being debated on here, but it is definitely a much better bike than the KLX-FOR SURE!

This bike is super stable, super nimble (though the brakes could be more like my TE) and is pretty darn good offroad. You have to keep in mind here, this is a dual sport bike. It has to do off-road and on-road duty,so there are going to be trade-offs. One of them is weight. Is it the best dirt bike-no. Is it the best street bike-no, but it's pretty damned fun to ride. It's definitely better than the KLX in both areas. On-road, I'd much rather have the WR. Off-road, it beats the KLX only because it has more power. The suspension is not as plush, but handles bigger obstacles than the KLX. For CC or hare scrambles, give the KLX 46hp, and the rest would work pretty damned good.

As for your size, this may be an issue for this bike. This bike has a great engine, but remember, it's a 250. You're going to find a big flat spot in 3rd gear with this bike in stock form, and it's a flat out-weenie on the bottom. If you plan on trail riding and you're not plannig on riding at competition speed, the WR is going to have a hard time lugging your weight around in anything tuough. Yes, a 650 is heavier, but anyone who thinks a big man would be better on a 250 than a 650 in the thick and nasty has never ridden an XR-650.

My cousin was in the same situation you're in. 270lbs. and needing something more than a 250 to pull him through. Where we ride, anything can happen. 75% of the time that anything is a mud bog. I can tell you from experience that the WR won't chug his ass through anything, but that XR-650 will chug him through the nastiest, blackest crud you never want to get into.

I've seen lots of folks on here trying to draw parallels between this WR and a 650 before. Let me tell you that there are no parallels to be drawn. While the WR lives in the top end, it's absolutley no match for a big XR-650. I've ridden with my cousin while I was riding both the WR and my Husky TE-450. Here's how it shakes out. The TE-450 is a Ferrari-type dirtbike, has nearly twice the horsepower of the WR and weighs 30 lbs. less. The TE zips right out of the gate all the way to about 60 when that XR-650 starts hitting its stride and reeling me in. At around 70, he's getting close and when I'm doing 85, the XR-650 is gone and moving off fast. This is a highly tuned performance 450 vs. the XR-650. How do you think the WR does? Not even close. While the WR is trying to build revs the big 650 is chugging through the rpms with more bottom end torque than a locomotive. It doesn't rev that fast, but 650cc's get you a big bang for the buck. It's getting all that wieght up to speed quicker than the WR through sheer good old fashined horsepower like only 650cc's can give you and keep in mind this is the "L" model. The WR does have quite an impressive top end for a 250, but trying get there from a dead stop beside a big XR-650 will leave you eating XR roost. Believe that a WR-250 will keep up with an XR-650 like you believe an XR-50 will keep up with a WR-250.

As for the gas mileage, like I said, I check mine everyday. I can tell you from experience that lots of factors affect the fuel mileage on a 250cc engine. Where I live, it's hot and humid. The hotter it is, the worse my mileage is, the more humidity there is, the worse the mileage is. On the best day, crisp air, 60 deg, low humidity and if I only tickle the gas all the way to work and back, I can squeeze about 60-61 out of the bike, but this bike lives in the upper rpm and tickling the gas is not what I do. Under normal riding, it does 54-56mpg. I wiegh 200 lbs. If you're over 250-forget 60mpg unless you're only crakcing the throttle and it takes you 3 minutes to get to 55mph. If you have much humidity or heat and you wiegh over 250 lbs. Thank God at night if you hit 58 mpg. This thing gets pretty good gas mileage all the way around-far better than the Suburban I drive during the winter, but the engine is so small a few degrees affects the mileage tremendously. Don't believe that just because someone squeezed 65-70mpg out of thiers once that it's going to do it all the time. Take the average over a year, mine does 56mpg. Damn, isn't that good enough? Gas mileage isn't even what I'd be worried about if I were you. Who gives a shit what the mileage is if it doesn't have enough power to get you where you want to go as fast as you want to get there? Not me. I'm happy with admitting the truth that mine averages 56. Who brags about damned gas mileage?

Seat-ride 30 miles on a WR, then switch to an XR-650. You're ass will thank you. The WR isn't that bad, but for big guy, it will be downright inhumane.

Engine life-The valve check claim is nice, but the XR-650 air cooled engine is as solid as a rock. You can't blow it up with a bomb. Get it hot enough o cook Uraniuam cakes on, it just keeps on chugging. This is the same engine it has always bee for a reason. If it wasn't worth a damn, would they have sold as many as they have. The XR-600/650 is arguably the best sellling dual sport Japanese motorcycle ever.

There are going to be lots of folks on here that like to think this bike can jump the grand canyon and I'm not disputing that it's a great bike. However, smaller guys are going to have more fun on this bike than a big guy. It's going to work better for smaller guys than for bigger guys. I'm sure there are some big guys who ride WR's and love them, but you have to take into consideration what you want. Those big guys that do love them probably don't ride A-class harescrambles. They probably don't ride this bike at more than a beginner's pace through the bush eventhough they feel like they're doing mach 3. Some don't even care. The bike is relaxed and user-friendly for someone of their build and that's what they want. I love mine becuase it's just fun to ride, not becuase it has 300hp. or bets 427mpg., but I wiegh around 204 also. It responds to my weight better than it would to 250 lbs.

In the end, you're going to have to decide what you want to do with the WR. If you're a big guy and you have to have lots of HP and torque, I can tell you from side-by-side comparison type experience, go with the XR-650. If you're going to putt through trails and enjoy easy beginner type scenery, the XR will do that too and still have power to get you out of trouble. The WR will be great for those type of riding experiences at your size, but will leave you gagging every one of those little 250 cc's to get you out of a jam. If you're a leisure rider & don't have any intention of ever needing a tractor to get you through a trail, the WR will be o.k. However, ask my big cousin about his purchase & he'll tell you "hate the weight, but glad I didn't get anything smaller". You will have to make the decision how you want to ride. If you're going to need HP to get your frame out of a jam, that XR has it.

In the end, it's your $7,000 it's up to you to decide how you want to spend it. It's just a hard leson to learn when you wind up with something that is too underpowered for your size.

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Well put roostmaster, thae same can be said for any dual sport bike, seems to me the crux of it all is, this is a compromise bike, it's not the best at anything but tries to find middle ground. I couldn't be happier with mine, as in alot of 250 for the $

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"There are many folks on here who get pretty hot-headed about this issue. They absolutely love this bike and think it's the coolest thing ever. They take it persoanlly when folks speak honestly and say something they don't want to hear about the bike."

A more defensive/militant group, even among KLR and XR owners, would be hard to find! LOL!!!

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"There are many folks on here who get pretty hot-headed about this issue. They absolutely love this bike and think it's the coolest thing ever. They take it persoanlly when folks speak honestly and say something they don't want to hear about the bike."

A more defensive/militant group, even among KLR and XR owners, would be hard to find! LOL!!!

YOU SON OF A B... :p

The bike I own is the best in the WORLD, does everything better than anything!

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Ah, I get it... Unless you race more power does not always equal a better experience.

I chose the WR250R over all the 650s because it's 50+ pounds lighter than any of them and the difference in horsepower is worth it when you factor in the WR's first valve check is scheduled at 26,000 miles and the air-cooled bikes are lucky to even make it that far.

The bike will keep up with any 650 on the road up to about 85-90 mph (actual) and will spank them all on tight single-track. The WR's suspension (when properly set-up of course) is light years better than the older low-tech bikes.

Throw in the 350 watt (!) alternator, 70 mpg and considering they are roughly the same price going with the WR was an absolute no-brainer for my purposes.

Here's a guy who bought a new WR250R and immediately got rid of his almost-new Husky TE610:

http://www.bigdogadventures.com/WR250R.htm

When the WRR's suspension is set up it IS decent. However its 20+ year old technology.(atleast the shock is). But with a oil change, spring rate suitable for rider weight and some minor changes in the shim stacks, WOWEE!

Too bad most people will never even change the oil. Dont know what their missing.

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Ah, I get it... Unless you race more power does not always equal a better experience.

I chose the WR250R over all the 650s because it's 50+ pounds lighter than any of them and the difference in horsepower is worth it when you factor in the WR's first valve check is scheduled at 26,000 miles and the air-cooled bikes are lucky to even make it that far.

The bike will keep up with any 650 on the road up to about 85-90 mph (actual) and will spank them all on tight single-track. The WR's suspension (when properly set-up of course) is light years better than the older low-tech bikes.

Throw in the 350 watt (!) alternator, 70 mpg and considering they are roughly the same price going with the WR was an absolute no-brainer for my purposes.

Here's a guy who bought a new WR250R and immediately got rid of his almost-new Husky TE610:

http://www.bigdogadventures.com/WR250R.htm

I happen to have personally ridden against a new XR-650L. My cousin bought his new in 2007. The 650 is just too much for the WR. I ride with him all the time. My TE won't even hang with the tall geared XR over 80 or so though it out accellerates it to that point. The WR starts dropping off much more quickly. There are folks on here who like to think it will outrun the 650. Don't let them lie to you. Take it from someone who has tried at least 100 times in heads-up road trips. In the woods, you're 100% correct. Get 'em on a straight away and you'll be eating XR roost for dinner. I will supply video if I need to, but hey, you got a great bike and you're happy with it so what difference does it make. Keep the htread alive and let everyone know what you think. Input form larger riders would be useful information for others.

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I got alot of heat from nutz for my opinion awhile back. If you plan on staying stock, the WR is a better bike than a DRZ. Once you start looking for more, the DRZ has more potential and a higher bang per dollar. The DRZ can be at 40 HP for about $500 if you pay too much for a used FCR and jetting. They both need bars, skidplates, tires, gearing, etc.

I know the positives of the WRr but also know its limitations. Stock vs. stock it wins in my book. When it is said & done, with pipes, tuners and cams, torbos and nitrous,,,it is still pushin maybe 34 HP at the crank on a very optomistic dyno,,,a 50 HP 6 speed DOT legal TE610 is cheaper & more versatile in the long run, better suspended & higher potential too.

Release the hounds!!!

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Get some dirt tires on this thing and it's a whole different animal. If you don't want to jump right out with new tires on a new bike, be sure to bleed off some of the air pressure. I absolutely could not ride mine with stock tires and reccommended pressures. Letting off about 1/3 of the air pressure from the front & rear tires made them half way ridable. Search these threads, the biggest issue you will find with the bike that most everyone complains about is the stock tires. The bike really shouldn't even be ridden off the showroom floor without a new pair of dirt-only tires.

The stock tires weren't actually bad on dirt and wet rock at all, in fact I was pleasantly surprised. Now slimy mud was a different animal all together. I had planned to change them immediately after I bought the R2 but I pushed the OEM Deathwings through their paces first to get an idea what they were like. It now has MT21s.

I'm 6' and weigh a tad over 200lbs and this bike seems the perfect fit for me. The R2 goes everywhere my previous DRZ400S did and more (and usually faster because I'm not fighting a top-heavy beast). Honestly the WR250F would have probably been the best choice for my needs but seeing how I need a plate that's not an option here in WA state.

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