Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

2009 TE 310 First Ride Impression

Recommended Posts

For those who are considering buying a Husky for the first time, here is my initial impression of my new 310, coming from the perspective of a long time rider/racer but first time Husky owner. First off, I just want to say that I made up my mind to buy a 310 early last summer when I first learned that Husky was coming out with it, so the anticipation has been huge for me. As a point of reference, I owned two Yammie WR 250Fs for the past 7 years, an ’03 that was street legal and an ’07 aluminum framer, which I used as my “race/trail” bike. Both bikes were flawless in reliability, so I have no complaints with owning them. Just wanted what the Husky seems to offer: Small bore 4-stroke, street legal and European style. I am breaking down my thoughts by Kudos and quirks: All you long-time Husky guys, please feel free to give your thoughts, as this is all new to me.

Kudos:

Initial set-up – Hands down better, easier and simpler than the WR’s, especially the ’07 WR. I removed the O2 sensor, fuel overspill canister, catalytic converter from the mid-pipe and changed the air-filter cage and viola. I was quite pleased. I also now know why you say to check the air pressure. It had 30 lbs in each tire! I also did the up-tite Y and the 5/16” FI hose for the coolant system. I have an up-tite guard too, which will go on after my first oil change, which will be now at exactly 50 miles.

Looks – Everyone who is on this site knows how cool and good looking they are. People are constantly asking me if the valve cover and the oil line on the right side of the bike are aftermarket.

Ergos/handling – I still own a 1996 Gas-Gas 125 with TM engine. Great bike. The Husky is very similar in ergos and ride handling. Long wheelbase and a tight rake. So it turns nice in the woods but is really stable. I also like the footpeg positioning. It almost feels like lowboy pegs stock. I have long legs, so being cramped in the legs is always a bummer. I find KTM’s for example to be really cramped from a seat to peg relationship. The bars are great but a pain in the butt to deal with. First off, you can’t cut them shorter than 30”, or you can’t adjust the brake where you want. Secondly, the wall tubing is so thick, I had to drill out the ID of the bar to accommodate an aluminum handguard insert. It is a really nice bar in comfort and quality, but I see a Pro taper woods-bend bar in my future.

Engine – Wow, what a cool engine. I have had this thing in my garage for over a month now sitting out a long North Jersey winter. I have been doing my due-diligence putting around on it near by house trying to break the engine in. Well, I did 30 miles in south Jersey (aka Pine Barrens) yesterday and I now know what this engine is about. The sound is like nothing else I’ve ridden, the valve noise is more like mechanical music than marbles in a blender, which is how I think some have described it. The power comes on strong, but very manageable off the bottom and then pulls really long. First gear is totally usable in the south jersey tight woods. By far the best engine I have ever ridden and if it is as reliable as my WR’s, I will be ecstatic.

Street legal – NJ tag, complete with inspection sticker to 2013!!!!!!

Quirks:

Exhaust pipe – This is the 2nd biggest issue in my opinion. The 2009 Arrow pipe seems to come in contact with my riding pants everywhere. I burn my pants (OTB) in front of the main guard, behind it and also behind the new silencer guard that attaches to the subframe. I actually burned a hole in my pants from the exposed area between that rear guard and the silencer can. For those in the aftermarket business, more coverage is CRITICAL . Once I can figure out how to put photos on TT, I will show you where the burnt nylon now graces my exhaust. On a positive note, the exhaust now seems to be far enough away from the air box to not burn it.

Kick starter hitting throttle cable – The end of the kickstarter tip rubs up against the throttle cable. I actually had rubber on the end of my kicker lever. A dremel should provide the needed clearance

Radiator shrouds – By far the biggest quirk from my perspective. OK, what was the thought process behind this system? First off, the lower shrouds make the tank harder to line up when you put the tank back on. Are you supposed to take the lower shrouds off, line the tank and then but the lowers back on? The real issue though is that these things are like commercial fishing drag nets for tight woods riding. They seem to want to high-five every thing they go past. Are there any mods to mitigate the obtuseness of this design? I tweaked the lower guards out of position (they came out from under the gas tank shroud twice without hardly hitting anything? Please help with suggestions? Its like the Husky’s look beautiful but their functionality wasn’t all that well planned out. I think a pair of OFG braces are in my future. Big frustration yesterday.

Suspension – For all of you who watched “Tom and Jerry” growing up, Whiskers DID see this steamroller coming. I know that it was going to be a bear to deal with for break-in. I turned the compression all the way out and went to town riding it. After about an hour, I was bouncing off the trail. My buddy said I had to turn my rebound it to slow it down. He was right, the bike became totally ridable once I did that. I dare say that I even turned the compression in on the shock about 10 turns and it felt even better. The fork, forget it. Stiff and spikey! Left the compression all the way out for the remainder of the day. Turning the fork’s rebound in helped it immensely, but the forks were not pleasant on anything sharp or square edge. At 160 lbs, I think the spring rates were in the ball park, at least for the shock. I can even touch the ground comfortably now, so mission accomplished breaking in the suspension.

Clutch pull – It actuates beautifully, but the pull is a little stiff. I got a huge blister on my middle finger from actuating it all day.

Top Speed – This thing is supposed to be a six speed, right? Without stressing the engine, top speed (according to the speedometer) was about 40 mph at about 5500 rpm. My WR was good for about 48 mph at around the same rpm and that was a 5 speed. I will check the speedo against my handheld GPS. If this is accurate, kind of disappointing for dual sport riding. I mean a KLR/KLX 250 can do better than that, right?

Bottom Line:

Sorry for such a long post. The new 310 is awesome and I can only see it getting better. Once I get the quirks worked out, I can easily see this being the best bike I’ve ever owned. I would recommend it to anyone who is on the fence. Since I have had several European bikes in the past, I have no issues with how the Husky rides and handles. It also handles WAY better than a KTM (imho). If you are wondering about weight, its heavy. You never feel it on the trail only when you drop it and your leg gets pinned under it. Fuel capacity on the stock tank? 30 miles and the reserve light never came on. Maybe good for 40 miles if you’re on the gas? I hope this helps those deciding on going to Husky. So far, I’m glad I did!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice write-up. Do you want speed or a dirt bike?? I have a 2009 KLX250s and it should never be in the same paragraph as a Husky! Two completely different bikes and you should expect them to go faster,,,, they are ROAD bikes.

I debated waiting for the 2009 TE310 but found a smoking deal on a 2008 TE250 back in July. Easy road riding I was getting 55+ mpg (with PU kit). Hard riding single track and I see 45+ mpg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a 2008 TE250 with the 300 kit and my bike would get 60 miles of mixed trails fire roads before running dry. The odd thing is that over half the rides I went on last year were long enough to warrant carrying extra fuel.

I so wish Husky would have but a tank big enough to get 80 miles out of.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got the new 310 but i have not had a chance to ride

it yet. How is everybody liking theirs. Do they make a good

woods bike? Are you happy with your choice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice report.

The suspension will break in and work much better. The forks might still need fixed (LTR works magic on them) The Engine will too and spin up quicker and make more power everywhere. I have never done this but Scott summers is hard on bike and swears you can remove to opposing clutch springs and have an EZer clutch pull with no issues with the clutch slipping. Reliability wise i bet it is every bit as good as your yami while being EZer to work on. they really are great bikes. Here's hoping BMW does not mess that up (friends of mine that have rode the new BMW 450 local hate it)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just an FYI, I bought a 2008 TE510 and the dealer installed the power up kit, but left the o2 sensor in place. Seems like the best of both worlds, breaths easy and still has an altitude compensating FI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just an FYI, I bought a 2008 TE510 and the dealer installed the power up kit, but left the o2 sensor in place. Seems like the best of both worlds, breaths easy and still has an altitude compensating FI.

Without the 02 sensor in place, it still adjust for altitude. Are you running lean?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still having a hard time getting my head around a premium DS bike like the 310 with the burnt leg/airbox issue persisting into 2009. I've been reading about that problem on bikes back to 2007 at least, and probably earlier. What kind of Italian engineering is that??:p:ride:

Ok - rant over.

BTW, great write up by OP - thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put up some pics of your pantleg issue and we'll see if it's much different from the 08's. I've got the 08 and the mid pipe guard and have no issues. Maybe the routing of the pipe is slightly different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Without the 02 sensor in place, it still adjust for altitude. Are you running lean?

No, Dan at Motoxotica still adjusted the FI mapping, it runs quite well, I've had it up to 8,000 feet and it maintained power when carbureted bikes were getting rich and recently took it down to Baja, it ran great and used an average of 1/2 gallon less fuel at every stop compared to the carbed 450s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Without the 02 sensor in place, it still adjust for altitude. Are you running lean?

The EFI will still compensate for altitude without the O2 sensor in place. Still I would expect the bike to run very lean with this setup. Anyone know how big the power difference is when running with the sensor in place vs not? Wonder if a TE250/310 with the sensor in place would still make enough power to satisfy folk?

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No, Dan at Motoxotica still adjusted the FI mapping, it runs quite well, I've had it up to 8,000 feet and it maintained power when carbureted bikes were getting rich and recently took it down to Baja, it ran great and used an average of 1/2 gallon less fuel at every stop compared to the carbed 450s.

So is it safe to say if they needed 2 gallons to fill up you would only need 1.5? That is a 25% drop in consumption which is pretty impressive. I wonder if the best way to get max fuel economy is with the O2 sensor in place and then a PC tune?

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So is it safe to say if they needed 2 gallons to fill up you would only need 1.5? That is a 25% drop in consumption which is pretty impressive. I wonder if the best way to get max fuel economy is with the O2 sensor in place and then a PC tune?

Greg

Hoping this summer I will find out! There are several local shops with dynos that I am looking into for custom maps for the PC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quirks:

Exhaust pipe –

Kick starter hitting throttle cable – The end of the kickstarter tip rubs up against the throttle cable. I actually had rubber on the end of my kicker lever. A dremel should provide the needed clearance

I just picked up my 09TE450- and have been inspecting it- and looking for tweaks before the trail- (I have time still lotsa snow)

kickstarter: on mine- one of the first things that was noticed was how nicely it tucked out of the way- mine does not come close to touching cables or airbox or anything- probably cause my efi is higher than the 250/310 due to the taller motor...

Radiator shrouds – By far the biggest quirk from my perspective. OK, what was the thought process behind this system? First off, the lower shrouds make the tank harder to line up when you put the tank back on. Are you supposed to take the lower shrouds off, line the tank and then but the lowers back on? The real issue though is that these things are like commercial fishing drag nets for tight woods riding. They seem to want to high-five every thing they go past. Are there any mods to mitigate the obtuseness of this design? I tweaked the lower guards out of position (they came out from under the gas tank shroud twice without hardly hitting anything? Please help with suggestions? Its like the Husky’s look beautiful but their functionality wasn’t all that well planned out. I think a pair of OFG braces are in my future. Big frustration yesterday.

I too look at this area- I do notice though that the radiators themselves are tucked in nicely- they hide behind the fork tubes- but the plastic top (tank cover) has that arrow sticking out that looks like it is a weak point- that would be fine ( shrouds break) but the way it is attatched to the tank puts alot of pressure on the tank and thread insert- I was looking for a way to attatch that rather than that bolt- or to just cut the upper tank cover to be flush with the radiator cover. Basically cut of that point... I was thinking of takinig off the nice stock plastic putting it in a box and getting an aftermarket set to ride with/ruin.

Clutch pull – It actuates beautifully, but the pull is a little stiff. I got a huge blister on my middle finger from actuating it all day.

Mine is incredably light- amazing- however it it a long throw- to fully disengage you have to get it close to the bars- but I ususally have the master moved close to the grips- with any switches on the other side- then cut off the tip of the lever where the breakaway is. That changes the length of the lever and it comes less close to the bar so you can use 1/2 fingers on the lever and leave the others gripping the bar (now they'd get in the way of the lever)

I can't wait to go to work on the bike and start breaking it in- this thing is beautifully put together- fit and finish is amazing. lotsa nice parts cleanly put together- I plan to keep the thing plugged up till after break in- but everything (2009 power up kit) comes with these... including the led tail light

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm still having a hard time getting my head around a premium DS bike like the 310 with the burnt leg/airbox issue persisting into 2009. I've been reading about that problem on bikes back to 2007 at least

Not sure where you read that but never saw any issues before 08 when they completely changed the frame and airbox and put the pipe on the other side. Even then it was mainly a TE issue before the removed the very hot catalytic converter.

My 08 TXC450 never had the problem until I crashed hard on an uphill trying to avoid a crazy Australian and broke the mid pipe mounting bolt allowing the pipe to sit against it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, great write-up:

Radiator shrouds – The real issue though is that these things are like commercial fishing drag nets for tight woods riding. They seem to want to high-five every thing they go past

:) I can picture this very well. That dang seam does catch (& collect) a lot of brush. Guys I ride with have told me I should always ride the tight overgrown trails ahead of them so I can clearcut the path. At the end of some sections my bike looks like it's been camouflaged with real foliage.

I actually burned a hole in my pants from the exposed area between that rear guard and the silencer can.

Wrapping header tape around the pipe will help that.

I started wrapping the pipe years ago on my bikes after burning a few sets of pants while picking up &/or bulldogging my bikes down really steep downhills.

Have a mid-pipe guard on my TE now, but still have wrapped the pipe(s) from head almost to muffler. Not only keeps my pants from burning if I lean against it, but helps keep heat away from radiator and carb for cooling running

(FYI: I agree with weantright about the speed vs dirt bike issue.......hard to have it both ways)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great OP! Glad to hear you're having fun. Are you planning any of the enduros or DS in the area? I'm heading to Sandy Lane this week, Greenbriar in April and probably the Scrub Pine next week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the report.I look forward to seeing how my impressions matches up with yours as I just picked up a TE310 as well.

Haven't ridden it yet but just going over it in the garage I like the fit & finish.I must say I concurr with your take on the weight.It certainly is no light weight & I hope it carries it well while ridden as you've indicated.

I bought it to do some scrambles,D/S,fun rides and an occassional vet mx race.I got sick of having too many so called specialized bikes & my thinking is this is a great all around bike for an aging vet Mxer who wants to have fun & ride different dirt disciplines.Down in the pines the plate seals the deal in this day & age!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So is it safe to say if they needed 2 gallons to fill up you would only need 1.5? That is a 25% drop in consumption which is pretty impressive. I wonder if the best way to get max fuel economy is with the O2 sensor in place and then a PC tune?

Greg

That's about right, but we couldn't be very scientific since most of the time we were fueling out of 1/2 gallon milk jugs, but I think it would be safe to say the TE510 used 15-20% less fuel than the KTMs, CRF and WR Yamaha that were along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×