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how do you measure a tabletop?

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real quick, how do you physically measure the distance of a tabletop jump? i'm new (obviously) and i'm moving up to the big tabletop and trying to get a mental on it. so i paced 20 paces (60ft) on the top, then the local guy who said he helped build it, told me it was a 100ft tabletop. i told him the flat top was 60ft from lip to lip, but he said you count some of the ramp area too. (btw, my paces are pretty accurate, i pace things off almost every day for the job i do..)

the reason i'm wondering is i'm trying to take in advice when people say "95ft tabletop i hit on a 250sx with 3rd pinned". and there's a big difference between 100ft and 60ft. but then again, when i hit this easy on 4th (on a rm250), i came up a few feet short every time. (was told to do 1/2 throttle on 4th, but you have to come out of a berm and i'm having trouble carrying the speed out of it.. )

thanks..

..george

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It all depends on the track builder. However most like to count them off from base to base. The number is bigger and it just sounds better to say "yeah, I can huck that 100ft table top and I am a man."

Personally, when I am doing it I go from where my tires leave the ground to where they come back down. I'm not out to impress anyone but myself. As you are well aware, it doesn't really matter from track to track anyway. If the ramps are faced differently etc... you can be on one track and have to hit a jump way faster than on another track do to the arc of your flight path anyway.

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I did not even think about the measurement being base to base. I just kind of assumed it was the minimum distance of flight needed to land the jump cleanly. So are you going to rain on my parade and tell me that the 70' table i've been hittin' may only really be 50'? Well crap sandwich. LOL! I guess I'm gunna bring my measuring wheel next time.

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Yeah, I realized it was total length too; someone said the small table I was clearing was 60'. I looked at it; you could fit maybe 1 1/2 of my vans on the top, which is about 30'. It does make me sound cool to my non-moto friends when I tell them I had to slow down for a 60 footer or I'd way over-shoot the landing!

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Top of lip to top of landing. Track owners/builders always overcompensate because it's cool to say you have a 100ft jump.

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I guess everyone has a different method mine is from lip to lip, only because this is the flat tabletop you are clearing and you take off from the lip and clear the flat area which would be considered the table top. I definately like the toe of ramp to the toe of landing better it sounds great for conversation. Thats my take. If your clearing a 100ft table you are the man thats like 4th pinned on an average take off angle. Good Job. Im impressed.

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Top of lip to top of landing. Track owners/builders always overcompensate because it's cool to say you have a 100ft jump.

Ha, yeah this is so true. I watch a guy build a new jump one day and I paced it off. The next day on their website, the length of the jump was way over stated. I have also seen people call a table top that had a bit of a hump in the center a step up.

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I did not even think about the measurement being base to base. I just kind of assumed it was the minimum distance of flight needed to land the jump cleanly. So are you going to rain on my parade and tell me that the 70' table i've been hittin' may only really be 50'? Well crap sandwich. LOL! I guess I'm gunna bring my measuring wheel next time.

By your definition you are measuring lip to lip (minimum flight time) so how do you go from 70' to 50'? If you were measuring lip to lip then your distance should go up not down.

If a double is measured peak to peak then why wouldn't a table be measured the same way? From the spot your tire leaves the ground to the spot it lands.

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By your definition you are measuring lip to lip (minimum flight time) so how do you go from 70' to 50'? If you were measuring lip to lip then your distance should go up not down.

If a double is measured peak to peak then why wouldn't a table be measured the same way? From the spot your tire leaves the ground to the spot it lands.

Track builder says "that's a 70' table over there". (base to base). But really it's only 50' lip to lip. I 'm thinking I'm clearing 70' when in reality it's only 50'. I guess one could say that I only have to jump 50' to clear a 70' table top. LOL.

And

Are doubles measured lip to lip? I suppose they could be measured base to base as well.

Bonus question. I wonder how singles are measured.:)

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I can see why it would matter to a jump record holder, or to a freestyler, but to a racer the only gap that matters is how far up to P1, or how far back to P2. And some track builders do it because a hundred foot table sounds way cooler than a 91'4" table top.

PS: If you practice corner speed enough, it won't matter at all.

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+1 :)

Put it this way, the base was not included as part of Robbie Madison's record breaking jump was it???

another +1. I was going to say that, but you beat me to it!

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Lip to lip.Period.

Ditto that. Base doesn't mean anything. All mine are lip to lip. Same with doubles.

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